Asperger-syndrome

You have now completed the 50 questions of the Aspergers AQ test and have your AQ score in front of you.

So what does this number mean?

Interpreting Your AQ Score

Basically the range for possible answers is 0 to 50. The information below shows you the different ranges as recorded from others sitting this same AQ quiz over the years.

  • 0-11 low result – indicating no tendency at all towards autistic traits.
  • 11-21 is the average result that people get (many women average around 15 and men around 17)
  • 22-25 shows autistic tendencies slightly above the population average
  • 26-31 gives a borderline indication of an autism spectrum disorder. It is also possible to have aspergers or mild autism within this range.
  • 32-50 indicates a strong likelihood of Asperger syndrome or autism.

In fact, scores of 32 or above are one of strong indicators of having as ASD.

It is important to keep in mind that this quiz and the result you got are a useful tool, but are by no means a form of diagnosis or asperger’s syndrome or an autism spectrum disorder. If your resulting AQ score was above 31 then you may want to follow up with a medical practitioner to do further tests in order to determine 100% if you do have an ASD or aspergers.

If you suspect that you or someone you care about is affected by asperger then it is important that you continue to learn more about this condition. You can begin on this website with some of the useful articles that are here and more that will be added in the future.

Simon Baron-Cohen, a psychologist from Cambridge’s Autism Research Centre was assisted by his colleagues in the development of this AQ test. This Autism Spectrum Quotient quiz was created to give an indication of autism spectrum disorder traits in adults.

It is interesting to note that 16.4 was the average score that people received in the first major trial of this autism test. Another point of interest is that around 80% of those actually diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder got an AQ score of 32 or higher out of the maximum 50.

Autism Spectrum Quotient Questions

Below are the actual questions and instructions on taking the AQ Quiz

How to take the Aspergers AQ Test

For each question, record if you “Definitely agree”, “Slightly agree”, “Slightly disagree” or “Definitely disagree”.

1. I prefer to do things with others rather than on my own.

2. I prefer to do things the same way over and over again.

3. If I try to imagine something, I find it very easy to create a picture in my mind.

4. I frequently get so strongly absorbed in one thing that I lose sight of other things.

5. I often notice small sounds when others do not.

6. I usually notice car number plates or similar strings of information.

7. Other people frequently tell me that what I’ve said is impolite, even though I think it is polite.

8. When I’m reading a story, I can easily imagine what the characters might look like.

9. I am fascinated by dates.

10. In a social group, I can easily keep track of several different people’s conversations.

11. I find social situations easy.

12. I tend to notice details that others do not.

13. I would rather go to a library than to a party.

14. I find making up stories easy.

15. I find myself drawn more strongly to people than to things.

16. I tend to have very strong interests, which I get upset about if I can’t pursue.

17. I enjoy social chitchat.

18. When I talk, it isn’t always easy for others to get a word in edgewise.

19. I am fascinated by numbers.

20. When I’m reading a story, I find it difficult to work out the characters’ intentions.

21. I don’t particularly enjoy reading fiction.

22. I find it hard to make new friends.

23. I notice patterns in things all the time.

24. I would rather go to the theater than to a museum.

25. It does not upset me if my daily routine is disturbed.

26. I frequently find that I don’t know how to keep a conversation going.

27. I find it easy to “read between the lines” when someone is talking to me.

28. I usually concentrate more on the whole picture, rather than on the small details.

29. I am not very good at remembering phone numbers.

30. I don’t usually notice small changes in a situation or a person’s appearance.

31. I know how to tell if someone listening to me is getting bored.

32. I find it easy to do more than one thing at once.

33. When I talk on the phone, I’m not sure when it’s my turn to speak.

34. I enjoy doing things spontaneously.

35. I am often the last to understand the point of a joke.

36. I find it easy to work out what someone is thinking or feeling just by looking at their face.

37. If there is an interruption, I can switch back to what I was doing very quickly.

38. I am good at social chitchat.

39. People often tell me that I keep going on and on about the same thing.

40. When I was young, I used to enjoy playing games involving pretending with other children.

41. I like to collect information about categories of things (e.g., types of cars, birds, trains, plants).

42. I find it difficult to imagine what it would be like to be someone else.

43. I like to carefully plan any activities I participate in.

44. I enjoy social occasions.

45. I find it difficult to work out people’s intentions.

46. New situations make me anxious.

47. I enjoy meeting new people.

48. I am a good diplomat.

49. I am not very good at remembering people’s date of birth.

50. I find it very easy to play games with children that involve pretending.

Psychologist Simon Baron-Cohen and his colleagues at Cambridge’s Autism Research Centre have created the Autism-Spectrum Quotient, or AQ, as a measure of the extent of autistic traits in adults. In the first major trial using the test, the average score in the control group was 16.4. Eighty percent of those diagnosed with autism or a related disorder scored 32 or higher. The test is not a means for making a diagnosis, however, and many who score above 32 and even meet the diagnostic criteria for mild autism or Asperger’s report no difficulty functioning in their everyday lives.

How to score your answers:

“Definitely agree” or “Slightly agree” responses to questions 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 12, 13, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 26, 33, 35, 39, 41, 42, 43, 45, 46 score 1 point.

“Definitely disagree” or “Slightly disagree” responses to questions 3, 8, 10, 11, 14, 15, 17, 24, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 34, 36, 37, 38, 40, 44, 47, 48, 49, 50 score 1 point.

 

466 Responses to “Interpreting AQ Test (Autism Spectrum Quotient) Results”

  1. heh

    I don’t think people understand Asperger’s too well. What I find particularly annoying is that these questions are tailored to identify people who aren’t superficial. What do I mean by that? Well, essentially you’re looking for non-conformist behavior where people don’t blindly trust society and its frameworks. They question it. “What is this? How does it work?” That doesn’t make someone have an autism disorder. It makes them smart. They are perceptive, they have a strong intuition. They can decompose things. For example, often people are having conversations with ulterior motives. Like for example, let’s take a date. If we are particular attracted to the other person we want them to have a favorable perception of us, so we say and do things to encourage this. We are trying to get the other person to have a particular cognition of us which may or may not be accurate. A person who can see this is not necessarily autistic.

    It would say the litmus test for Autism and Asperger’s is where the person is unaware of their behavior but has all the symptoms. Either unaware of partially unaware. If you’re aware of your own cognition and can change however you want, you probably don’t have a disorder. In fact, you are probably very intelligent.

    One thing to keep in mind is that all human constructs including society, religion and everything else were us attributing purpose to things where there really is no purpose. Now you might say that these things have meaning because of tradition and the value of the evolution of societies, but just because a person’s thought patterns don’t conform to the collective, doesn’t mean anything is wrong with them. In fact, you would not have great authors, artists, filmmakers and probably scientists thinking outside of the box if you disallowed this entirely.

    Food for thought. Cheers!

    Reply
  2. andrew

    My wife keeps commenting she thinks i have some form of autism, i took your test 3 times and scored 42 and 41 twice. The only question i changed were the pretending games as a child i thought i did but on second thoughts, all my games as a child involved exercise and never playing cops and robbers and such.

    I dont have any friends, i dont have acquaintances. I have people i get services from, and am often asked by my children after speaking to someone in passing “is that your friend”. I think the last time i had a friend was when i was 15, im now 36. My wife often tells me i am very blunt and rude to her friends, i just think i speak my mind.

    Im not sure i understand the questions about imagination, i consider myself to have a very good imagination and when im walking to pick my children up from school or going to work i often make a story up in my head and play that story over every time i do both until it has a reached a satisfactory conclusion . Do people with aspergers not have good imaginations?

    For the emotional aspect. when my grandparents all died i didn’t feel anything. Nor did i have the compunction to go to their funerals my wife told me i should go, my parents expected and asked me to go to all four i went to the first one with my wife and thought it was ridiculous to say things over a dead body who could no longer feel or think. I was asked and demanded upon to go to the other but i just didnt want to i didn’t feel the need to see a dead body in a coffin again and be near people i didn’t like, who only went for free food and to cry. Now i know that is not normal. I know to think that is not normal. I should have went but i wasn’t bothered about continuing a relationship with any of the people in my family and i haven’t.
    With all that said it seems like im an emotional robot, but i do cry at a film sometimes if im alone or a book. So i do seem to have emotions but i just don’t seem to be able to attach those emotions to people outside my immediate family unit. my wife is extremely dear to me as are my children.
    My wife wants me to get tested but i just dont see how having some affirmation of an abbreviated shortcoming will affect my life. Im currently working, my wifes working we have a very good life we go on holidays, drink alcohol a couple of times a year have all the latest gadgets. im currently studying a degree in physics after watching the big bang theory comedy i thought i could do that so i am. I just dont see what a test would do.

    My wife asked me to go with her to a christmas dinner and big corporate thing this year, i said no im not particularly bothered about new people or big crowds really they make me feel a bit stuffy, i just dont want to embarrass her i know i will take some joke literally or tell someone a truth they don’t want to hear, she is a big hot shot business lady and i don’t want to impact upon her work. i told her this is the reason and think she was quite relieved.

    I seem to have a very good memory for certain things i can tell you the registration number of most of the cars that go to my childrens school, but i cant seem to remember a conversation i have had a week ago, nor what i cooked for tea the previous day. I can remember hazy aspects about my life certainly but i can tell you with absolute clarity my grand mothers telephone number from 30 years ago when i was 7. I know the number and address of every one of the 22 houses my contractor father dragged our family to during my childhood. yes 22 houses!

    I digress and ramble, I don’t know if i have aspergers the only worry i have is that my wife will start to care more and more about my seemingly odd behaviour. in every other aspect of my life i couldnt care less. I would only “get tested” if it would somehow improve or benefit my relationship with my wife. but i don’t see that it would.
    i guess i will consult her and discuss exactly how a positive or negative test result would impact us if at all.

    If you read all this thank you. And i will leave you with the wise words or Christopher Hitchins
    “What can be asserted without evidence can also be dismissed without evidence.”

    Reply
  3. Tim

    Hi Justine,
    First of all, thank you for facilitating such a clear and user-friendly test ^_^

    I’m male, and 37 years old, and I was overjoyed and relieved to have only scored 14!

    A forum which I frequent, has a very high number of aspies, and their constant misunderstanding, misinterpretations and downright argumentative towoard discussions, frankly, is often irritating enough to make me find something else to do (which isn’t in itself always a bad thing, but when someone’s behaviour drives people away from doing something they enjoy, then IMHO that _is_ a problem…) Being surrounded by/immersed in this ‘aspie soup’, and frequently finding myself at odds with them and their opinions, I was starting to wonder if _I_ was the a**hole who just didn’t get it, and if my love for debating and willingness to debate a point to death, could have meant that I was One of Them!

    Taking your test, with a score of 14, has shown quite clearly that I’m not — which is very reassuring to know…

    Thank you again, Best regards ^_^

    Reply
  4. Jessica Kalstad

    Hi. I am Jessica. I have had suspicions that I might have Asperger’s but I thought all of my problems were due to me having depression, anxiety, OCD, schizophrenia, and social anxiety. I have already been tested by a psychologist and Asperger’s was never mentioned. I also thought that 17 year old’s could be diagnosed with Asperger’s. I have always struggled with making friends, which made my school years almost terrible. I have had a few really close friends though, but some of them have really really hurt me, which made me retreat farther into my own shell. I have always been bullied and invisible. Although I am only 17, I feel like having mental disorders has defined my life as terrible and it will never go well. I do not understand what Asperger’s is and I hope to have that cleared up very soon. I have forgotten to mention I scored a 37 on this Asperger’s test.

    Reply
    • Karen

      I am in my late 40’s; and, scored a 35. It physically hurt to be in social situations when I was younger. Now, I either don’t get in those situations or have learned to copy what social people do to get by at work. At home, I just say Go Away or something else more derogatory. I would beg God to make me normal but now I am happy to be me. It took a very long time to reach that point. I hope it gets better with time for you.

      Reply
  5. Pamela

    Hi I am a 47 year old woman in Scotland currently waiting for an assessment.
    I am a mum of 6 grown up children. 1 son with autism and complex learning disability and 1 son, diagnosed 3 years ago ( aged 13 ) with Asperger syndrome.
    I decided to take the AQ test with my son, who has Aspergers to see how he answered the questions, so I could support him better. Well I was very shocked to score 37. I then went to the doctor and now awaiting an assessment .
    I have joined a local group for women on the spectrum and go along one a month. I have also went along to a neuro – diversity clinic where the lady did some tests and said I do show several red flags .
    Someone from the meeting also asked me if I felt like I ” Was Home ” after attending the meetings, and in all honesty I really don’t. I don’t particularly enjoy the meetings, unless I feel I am gathering something useful from being there, like information or anything.
    The thing is, I have read lots of things about ASD, and witnessed it first hand through my boys. And even though I do see things in myself, I still don’t see myself as being on the spectrum fully. Maybe I have just made some good adjustments in my life and taught myself many coping mechanisms, without realising.
    I am just confused about the whole thing I guess.
    I don’t really have any sensory issues, unless I am stressed, and I don’t have meltdowns. Although looking in my life I do have burnouts quite regularly and always wondered what caused them.
    One very confused lady

    Reply
  6. Debra

    I took this test and got a score of 32, went back and moderated some answers and scored 27 – not in the high range, but trending in that direction. I am most definitely an introvert and much that I read about autism spectrum disorders sounds a lot like introversion combined with hypersensitivity and some level of OCD. I do hope that focus on autism-spectrum personalities does not reinforce the idea that introversion is some kind of disorder – it is not. I am not broken, just different from the dominant extroverts. Overall I function fairly well in the world but I have chosen a profession that allows me to work largely alone. I look forward to and really enjoy my time alone, and need that time to restore after too much stress or too much dealing with people. I have learned to deal with people in various situations but it does not come naturally and when I’m tired I can’t do it and just need to withdraw to avoid offending people without meaning to. Interesting test, look forward to learning more about the research.

    Reply
  7. Stacy

    My score is 24. I have been diagnosed as having PDD-NOS at age 6 back in the mid 1990’s which later changed to “Asperger’s” in my teens (the diagnosis I mean). I am one of the few people with ADS not not have any non verbal problems or sensory issues but I had a wide variety of other autistic traits. I used to “stim” in private (never in front of people, not since early childhood) and I had intense obsessions. In my 20’s I started to experience “meltdowns” “shutdowns” and felt like I was losing my mental connection to the world and further going into myself. Then feelings of depersonalization set in for about a year as well and I felt my speech deteriorating. It become harder and harder to express my thoughts clearly, in order and with a sense of depth.

    It seems as though as time goes on I’m becoming “More autistic” (I know this isn’t possible).

    Reply
  8. Skylar

    Hello! This is the fifth time I’ve taken an ASD test and I’ve consistently scored within the spectrum. I have always wondered if I was in the autism spectrum but I figured that I wouldn’t be since it is usually diagnosed at very young ages. However, the stories of middle aged people on here discovering they could have ASD did give me a bit of hope.

    I struggle with a lot of mental illness (PTSD, Depression, Anxiety, BPD, and doctors believe I have DID) due to childhood trauma and emotional abuse. So I cannot be sure if I could have a clear diagnosis of ASD or my mental health is overlapping with the symptoms? I consider myself a bit of an extrovert but I’ve always been socially inept to the point where I prefer not to interact with others due to fear. It’s hard to tell whether I have extroverted or introverted traits.

    But I can relate with a lot of the ASD diagnosis criteria and I have scored a 33, which is a fairly consistent score on the other tests I have taken.

    I currently lack a therapist due to family members who refuse to let me get help, so I can’t really bring this up to a therapist in my area and talk about getting a valid diagnosis…

    I am still fairly young so I’m hoping I’ll be able to see a therapist in the future when I can pay for therapy myself.

    But thanks for posting this test & listening !

    Reply
    • Simon Glanville

      I got a score of 29 which according to the score interpretation means I have a borderline indication of an autistic spectrum disorder. I kind of thought I had mild autism or aspergers when doing a course on Austistic Spectrum Disorders through work and finding that I could relate to some of the information we were given about autism and some of my traits seemed a bit Autism like including wandering off into a world of my own when I am supposed to be listening to what the managers at work are saying etc sometimes. I know that last thing might not exactly count as Autism but it is a trait I’ve carried into adulthood. Also, I remember years ago, my sister saying she thought I was slightly autistic or something and to find out I am actually makes things a lot better! It will also be a good thing in my job as a support worker because one of the chaps we will be supporting is autistic and this will make it easier to relate to him.

      Reply
  9. Linda

    Hi Justine,
    It took over 2 hours of reading to get to this page but it was a good 2 hours. I’ve learned a lot and have been encouraged. Hope you see my reply to Barry. My first test scored 35. After reading many replies I retook the test and scored 37 (I’ll be 67 this summer). I’ve been confused about whether my childhood difficulties actually turned me into an aspie. I had learned by age ONE, yes age 1, “don’t ask; she isn’t coming”. About that time I learned to climb out of the crib, and a month later my brother was born, so life got easier for a while. But now my mom could brag to friends “Linda never asks for anything”. I obeyed with my heart and soul, which really made life tough; I couldn’t ask for help, for information, for love or attention. The next blow came when I was 10, alone in the kitchen doing the dishes (1-2 days worth? for a family of 6) when “she” blew through the swinging door, snarled that I was “good for NOTHING” and floated back out the swinging door. That hit me like an axe in the back and I entered the state of PTSD which was diagnosed 7 years ago. A counselor with training in EMDR helped me see the disorder and led me through to healing in 2-3 sessions. I say it was the counselor but really it was the Lord who sent me to her. I have been a Believer and Follower since age 5 when I had a choice between Dad’s belt (for a minor naughtiness) or a prayer to Jesus for forgiveness. Ironically, I regretted for nearly 40 years, while I still Followed, that I was forced to make such a choice until an acquaintance pointed out that she “would have chosen the belt!” Yikes! To finally realize that at age 5 I had known that my dad wanted to whup me but that Jesus loved me and I had responded to Him.

    So, was it PTSD or Asperbergs that made life so difficult for 50 years? Today I took the test again, answered it differently and scored 40. Meanwhile, since my first try two days ago, I have felt tremendously relieved of heavy burdens; I don’t have to measure up to my dad’s or mom’s expectations any more.

    By the way, reading through two years of replys, I see you have become a much warmer person. Blessings on your ministry to we who suffer and need forgiveness. Linda

    Reply
  10. Nate

    Interesting test. My wife had always suspected that our son could have ASD. She also thought I may be effected as well. I scored a 33 and a 29, so I guess I am borderline. I actually have read very little about the effects of ASD. I have multiple college degrees and have a good paying job that I love as a Mechanical Enginner. I always have been an introvert to a large degree. I am not sure if that makes it appear that I am borderline ASD or I am just socially inept due to being introverted. Thanks for listening.

    Reply
    • A Dawson

      I feel like I am in a similar situation where I don’t know if I have an ASD or I am just socially inept due to being introverted. I seem to consistently score just under the definitive line on these tests (not saying that the tests themselves are a proper diagnosis, but there is usually a line driven or some such saying it is rather likely). For instance on this particular test, I scored 31. In other words, far enough away from the standard of nuerotypical, but not quite reaching the threshold of near certainty. Part of me wants to go to a doctor about this, but right now I have limited money and don’t have proper insurance for a diagnosis. I want an answer, but am afraid I would be wasting money. Worse, I don’t even know how I would approach a doctor about it. Part of me feels like if I approach them directly about this, the results of any diagnosis might be skewed due to the doctor searching intentionally for things that could be seen as ASD, resulting in a misdiagnosis. Does anyone have advice for any of this?

      Reply
      • Sarah Berkner

        I scored a 29 on the test, and two people have thought I might have Asperger’s, but personally I am not sure how knowing I have Asperger’s would help me. But other people seem to feel better off knowing that they have it, and are able to understand themselves more, so that’s something you’d have to think about.

        Reply
  11. Leslie

    Thanks for posting the test.
    I’m a 44 year old woman and I scored a 32. I have just this week starting considering this for myself.
    I was watching a TV show with a character with Aspergers and started to see myself as a child in the little boy so I decided to do some research and found your online test.
    I now see I have struggled with a lot of the Aspergers traits for most of my life. I am also a HSP (Highly Sensitive Person) as well as suffer from PTSD from childhood & adult trauma. It’s a little confusing as all of this seems to overlap, but it is helping me to have a better understanding of myself and how I interact in this world.
    I hope to take this info and make better choices for myself in order to live a more fulfilling life within my comfort zone. Enough of the cookie-cutter expectations of society. There is enough room in this world for everyone!
    Thanks again,
    Leslie

    Reply
    • Justine

      Thanks Leslie for your comments 🙂

      Yes I agree with you that there is enough space in the world for each of us. Everyone of us with our strengths and challenges.

      I also like your comment about making better choices. That is something I need to remind myself to work on each and every day.

      Take care and God Bless You!
      Justine

      Reply
      • Ben

        Hi Justine- I have taken the quiz twice now, with scores of 46 and 45. It’s not much of a surprise in some respects, I’m a 67yr old who while a boy exhibited an unusual aptitude for all things musical, was playing piano in public recitals at age 7, cello at age 8 as well as very high scores on various IQ tests, but I also found it very difficult to practice my instruments or discipline myself to doing homework etc, and so barely scraped through HS and failed my first college semester, and since then I’ve only managed a few short years of gainful employment with the rest being subsidized by various government programs, I have only had one partner of 6 yrs in my entire life and we did not live together, I have no close friends and it has been that way all my life, I have a lot of acquaintances, it has always bothered me how little I actually care about the things that others care about deeply, my relationship with family has long been strained and I find that I dont think/care much about people who aren’t actually around me for some reason, but I dont ever share these honest feelings of disinterest for fear of reproach. I have long felt like a complete failure and judged myself for not being a better/more productive person in so many ways, and only in the last few years have I heard of and thought perhaps I had Aspergers. I was recently put on lamotrigine to combat a rather serious depression I’ve been in for a couple of years now, although the Doctor said he thinks mine is monopolar, but I’m wondering if perhaps I should have him evaluate me for autism and proceed from there?

        Reply
        • Justine

          Hi Ben 🙂
          Thanks for sharing about your own life and experiences.

          Each person needs to decide if it will be beneficial to obtain a formal diagnosis or not. As a starting point you could mention your concern about being on the Autism Spectrum with your doctor. See what he/she says and yes, take it from there.

          Take care.
          Justine

          Reply
  12. Jade

    Thank you, really interesting doing the test. I have a relative with Aspergers and was very interestd in my score, thank you for such a good test, with straight forward interpretation x p.s. all the best to Aspies they have great gifts and the more people realise this, they will get off their backs. We are all different and all could fit into one group or another – let’s show everyone equal respect

    Reply
    • Justine

      A great point Jade! Yes let’s respect and honour everyone equally!

      Thank you for your comment 🙂

      Justine

      Reply
        • Justine

          Hi Robin,
          3 of your previous comments have been approved.

          I am unsure what you mean about still waiting.

          I wish you all the very best,
          Justine

          Reply
    • Nicole

      I have a 10 year old son with Aspergers & have researched it whole heartedly since he was diagnosed four years ago. I believe my husband also has Aspergers, more severe than our son, but he refuses to get checked out. He is an extreme introvert, especially around new people & it takes him a very long time to be somewhat comfortable around them. If he doesn’t have something in common with them, he will walk away or just blatantly ignore them. He is absolutely not an affectionate person & doesn’t know how to comfort me or others when hurting or sad. I’ve never seen him get emotional or cry in 19 years of knowing him, & it’s obvious that he feels anxious when around it not understanding what to do. He says very rude things to people & doesn’t feel bad about it. He & our son have this complicated relationship of love and hate, both not realizing what or why for the way they are toward each other. It’s either all great or really bad every day, up & down, never in the middle. My husband hasn’t researched anything on Aspergers or tried to acknowledge that his son has autism. He’s never told anyone about it & won’t talk to me about it at all. It seems he gets embarrassed by me talking so openly to others, especially when in public & I’m explaining to a perfect stranger why my son is acting the way he is or doing at that time if inappropriate or thoughtless. It’s very hard to be married to Aspergers & be a mother to it too. It’s extremely lonely & exhausting. I love my husband & son very much and wouldn’t want my life any different. I just wish my husband would be more willing to understand that it won’t change how people view him if he got the proper testing for Aspergers. I did get him to take the AQ test & he scored a 46 on first test, didn’t think it was accurate so took 3 different other test & still scored extremely high on those too! He doesn’t want our son or him to be labeled! Don’t know what to do?? Any advice??

      Reply
      • Safensound

        Nicole, Im here as I think I have this condition. Ive just opened the pc back and read you entry, my father also has the condition I have Ive been diagnosed ADHD but I think its wrong. My father can be very selfish also as can I. A few responses come to mind, I engaged with mental health and got a diagnosis only to have my partner of nine years and use my diagnosis to portray me as someone unstable and crazy and not capable of seeing my children. The second point is of a similar vein people still face discrimination for all kinds of reasons, hence why people avoid issues. Other people could be concerned of losing jobs or opportunities etc. Another point is some people dont have this condition but they have bad points in other ways ie they cheat they gamble they take drugs etc etc. Im not saying its not hard for you just hope this is of some help.

        Reply
      • Irma

        You say, about your husband: “it won’t change how people view him if he got the proper testing for Aspergers”. So, why do you want him diagnosed then? Will *you* view him different?
        I understand it must be hard for you (full disclosure: I’m a 44 old woman with a 37 score :p) but really, what difference does it make? You know him, you understand he is not like most people, I guess that’s it.
        Asperger’s is not a disease. And it won’t go away either.
        Be their ally in a world that it’s confusing and stressful for them ALL THE TIME.
        Take care of yourself too, go out, leave them be, they’ll do fine together. “Together” for Aspies is probably different of what you’re expecting but *trust them*.
        They love you too. Relax. Breathe.
        Be well 🙂

        Reply
      • Sarah Berkner

        This is just my opinion, but I don’t blame your husband for not wanting to be labeled. I am probably borderline Asperger’s, but I feel the same way and also wonder what good it would do for me to be diagnosed with it. Maybe he would be willing to go through some counseling or therapy, if needed, without having to take the test.

        Reply
  13. Justin

    Hello!
    I’m a 20 year old guy in the UK and I ended getting a 35 and then a 37 on the AQ test.
    A few days ago when watching a show on TV with my parents called “Employable Me” on BBC 2 which is about people with tourettes, autism and aspergers. During a section of the show which was focusing on a guy who has aspergers syndrome, and information regarding it was mentioned my parents thought that I shared pretty similar behaviour and patterns to the guy on the show and what was described about aspergers, and with some spending some time thinking about it and doing some research about it myself I’ve come across a few things that sound a lot like me.

    I tend to be really awkward and anxious around over people and feel incredibly out of place in social encounters and when being around people I don’t know, I am either mute most of the time, don’t know what to say or sometimes just spend most of my time on the side alone or in the corner of the room. I really struggle with what to say under pressure or to start conversations, whether that’d be in person or even on the phone.
    I tend to have obsessive tendencies where I’d get really fixated on a particular thing for months and only ever move away from it if I become bored of it or something else takes its place. For example with games or music I will keep on playing or listening to it for ages and won’t ever get away from it until a long time. Or if it’s a particular subject like gaming computers I feel like I have to research it and know as much as I can about it even though anyone could get by without needing to know anything about it.

    There’s been a lot of other things too such as feeling overwhelmed by large crowds, loud chatter which just sounds like a jumbled mess or when I was a kid loud music, or not being able to feel sympathetic or know how to express emotion properly but I don’t want to make this post longer than it is.

    I’m not sure if I should get in touch with a GP and see if I should try and get diagnosed if I need to or not because I wouldn’t want to go in and waste anyone’s time if in the long run I don’t have either autism or aspergers.
    Would anyone recommend trying to get an appointment with my GP? Because I really don’t know what to do.

    Many thanks in advance to whoever reads and replies to this.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Justin
      It is great to have you visit this website and leave your comment. 🙂

      It truly is a personal decision to pursue a formal diagnosis. Some people decide to go ahead and others feel that they are coping ok with life and they decide to live without seeking to be diagnosed.

      From what you have said it does sound like you are finding some areas of life challenging. If you feel that these areas are causing you difficulty in your everyday life then in may be beneficial for you to seek out the opinion of your family doctor.

      You could at least bring up your concerns with your GP and see what he/she says. 🙂

      Whatever you decide, I truly wish you all the very best.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Tom

      Hi Justin,

      I’m in a similar position to you – I’m 31, also in the UK, and have recently realised that a lot of what I had previously considered my ‘quirks’ are in fact likely to be traits of Asperger’s/ASD. Your

      I have just been referred by my (very understanding) GP for a formal diagnosis of Asperger’s/ASD. The main reason I am seeking diagnosis is that I am starting to have difficulties at work, particularly with the noise problem. You may not be aware of this but employers have a statutory duty to make adjustments for employees with disabilities (which ASD is classified as in the UK). That also applies to college/university. I am hoping to be able to concentrate more on the tasks I am comfortable with (i.e. those that i can do by myself in a quiet room!) and cut down on the number of meetings/conference calls I am involved with, which cause me a lot of anxiety.

      Based on what you have written about how your quality of life is being affected I would definitely recommend at least speaking to your GP to discuss your concerns. I wish I had identified the (likely) cause of my issues much, much earlier – if you feel bad now, imagine how much worse it will be by the time you’re my age if you don’t do anything about it!

      Of course there is no cure, but I think a formal diagnosis will definitely help me to understand my strengths and weaknesses, and make changes where necessary. It may also make friendships/relationships easier if you can explain to people why you act a certain way.

      I found the National Autistic Society website (http://www.autism.org.uk/about/diagnosis/adults.aspx) really helpful, I hope you do too.

      Reply
    • Tom

      Hi Justin,

      I’m in a similar position to you – 31, UK, and have recently come to realise that I likely have Asperger’s/ASD. I scored 43 on the AQ test so god knows how it’s taken me this long to work it out…

      I found the National Autistic Society website really useful, particularly the page about the process of being diagnosed. I had already seen my GP about my sensitivity to noise, so when I told him that I suspected I have ASD he referred me for a formal diagnosis. It helped that he had recently had a patient who had also had the sensory issues.

      I would definitely recommend that you do the same, as it is obviously affecting your quality of life. You’re not wasting anybody’s time – the NHS is there to help you, and even if you don’t get diagnosed with Asperger’s/ASD it sounds like you need some help.

      It’s best to get it checked out now – I really wish I had made my ‘discovery’ at your age – the last 11 years would have been a lot easier.

      Also, you may not be aware of this but employers (and colleges/universities) in the UK have a statutory duty to make adjustments for people with disabilities – the main reason I am seeking a formal diagnosis is so that I can adjust my duties at work to do less of the things that make me anxious/uncomfortable.

      Reply
  14. Urooj

    Umm, Hi! I was reading a book about Autism and Aspergers and I realized that I have a lot of similar characteristics. The fixed routines, the characteristic tics, the social ineptitude, certain obsessions. I used to just write them up to me being socially awkward but I feel like my inability to follow conversations, school my expressions according to situations and even my coordination are getting worse.

    And now after getting a score of 35 on this test I am worried. I am a final year medical student. How could I not know if I had Aspergers? How do I confirm this? Should I see a psychologist? Any help would be much appreciated

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      You sound like you are doing quite well on your own with the systems and techniques that you have set up for yourself. If this is the case then being diagnosed may not be necessary/

      If you are struggling, as it sounds like you may be, then perhaps a website such as http://www.autismpak.com/ may be able to point you in the right direction.

      Perhaps use this resource as a starting place to give you more clarity on your own situation.

      I hope that helps.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  15. Rob

    I am 63 and a professor and have always been an outsider both physically and in thought. I find conversations with people to be boring and uncomfortable. My mind wanders and have been called a daydreamer and distracted. When I offer my opinion I speak my mind – the truth and cannot stand being PC or attempts at being diplomatic. It is how you say it I am told.

    Why would that make a difference? So, I tend to be the outsider but that is OK for my own sense of peace. Up to now I have never considered Asperger’s and completed the test when I saw it. My score is very high, but I suppose it would be good to know where I actually fit in, give some light to what others think is my psychedelic mind.

    Reply
    • Dave

      Rob,
      I’m 61 and was diagnosed as having Aspergers, just last year. Despite not knowing that I had Aspergers, I’ve developed a variety of algorithms and rules to follow that allow me to fit into “normal” society (kind of). When I was in the third grade, my mother told me I needed to let other people speak when I spoke with them; I worked on speaking patterns that allowed others to get in comments and even elicit responses from them. By the time I was in high school I was able to have (I thought) normal conversations.

      I got married in my mid 40s, and my new wife told me she refused to follow me around the country (I was a contract software engineer/programmer) ; she had gone with me on one contract and couldn’t bring herself to do another one. Serendipitously, a former colleague gave me a call and told me he was just hired as the systems manager at a software vendor, and asked if I wanted to come work for him as a software developer; I accepted, and told my wife. My wife told me she was glad we could stay in one place, but told me she needed to give me some advice. My wife told me that when I spoke to people I needed to stop speaking when they spoke, and to remain silent until they stopped talking. I didn’t realize I was still talking over people. I follow this algorithm my wife made for me, and it has greatly improved my ability to converse.

      Over the years I’ve worked on other problems I’ve had as well; e.g., eye contact. None of this has helped. I have been unable to get back into contract work, and I can’t hold down a job. I still can’t “read” people, so I don’t really fit in; most people think you can read their mind, and expect you to react to their thoughts I can’t do that. I have zero friends; even my wife has become a frenemy. I could go on and on about this, but it boils down to this – you can create your own interface to work through too deal with the world, but when the info gets to your Aspergers/HFA brain, you still can’t deal correctly with the information you receive.

      In summary, you should not seek a diagnosis. Don’t pursue this (as in I just substantiated an autistic class, and am accessing it as “this”). Working on Aspergers/HFA will in no way improve your life, and might even be detrimental. I might sound like “sour grapes”, but I’m objectively assessing what working on Aspergers/HFA has done for me, and I don’t think you or anyone else needs to go down that path.

      Dave

      Reply
      • Rich

        Wow, oh wow, Dave — your second-to-last paragraph could have been written by me.

        I’m 57 and have also spent my career in high tech. I worked for one company for 19 years and a second for 6 years, both huge household name companies. Beside two other jobs which lasted only five and nine months, I’ve been close to unemployed for the last 8.5 years. I do the occasional contract job for anywhere from a half-day to four months, which is miserable. As a filler, I’ve even applied to and been interviewed for retail jobs at $10/hour and have been rejected. On my last retail interview I know I blew it when I pointed out an error on their application form which, based on the date on the form, had been there since 2003.

        Like you, I absolutely cannot read people and apparently subtle hints about anything simply do not register — they result in a NOOP 🙂

        I am sure I think differently than most people. I like many things “just so” or more precisely, “done right” and constantly look for the optimum way of doing a task. It drives my family nuts when I move a pot to the optimum burner and center it to within a couple millimeters of dead center in two axis. There is an optimum way to load the dishwasher and it drives me nuts when someone does it differently because I’m compelled to fix it. Properly identifying and separating recyclables is another. I recently posted a reply to a question on Quora which has been viewed by over 100K people and upvoted more than 2200 times, which has pleased me immensely. The topic had to do with tasks people never do right.

        I also have zero friends and few acquaintances, which has had a negative impact on my job search. I have zero contact with former co-workers. I never get asked to do anything social such as getting together for a beer or going out for a long bike ride. Riding my bicycle 35-65 miles is my only saving grace but I ride alone probably five times out of six and the sixth is a group ride based on Meetup.com to which one does not have to be invited to participate.

        Depending which way the wind is blowing, my wife is an enemy or a frenemy, as you put it. We would be divorced if I had a solid job and could afford to live on my own and have health insurance. Instead, she tolerates my presence much of the time but has rightfully run out of patience. I feel I’m on the edge of being homeless despite my experience and education and desire to work.

        Just know you are not alone… though are probably as lonely as I am…..

        Reply
  16. Rob

    Second comment. I have always lived in my own world, and taken the comments about daydreaming, etc. as simply indicating that I am me. I have also always been uncomfortable with other people and find conversations about general things to be very boring, even taxing. However, I have also never tried to fit in because that is also very tiring. So, bottom line is that I am usually the black sheep, especially as an academic. I cannot be PC or diplomatic and so I say what I believe to be the truth – I wonder why people cannot just say it like it is? It is all about how you say it I am told. Really? Cannot understand why that would make a difference. So, I have never considered Asperger’s but did the test for the sake of it and my score is very high. It is confusing at my age to consider this as my problem, but still it is also easy in that it would be good to find a reason for my ‘psychedelic mind.’ That would be like fitting in somewhere.

    Reply
  17. Rob

    Hi, my score is 41. Can there be so many with this problem? I relate to the issues very much and have always had serious problems with social situations. However, I am 63 and a professor. I have always had a serious tension within regarding being some sort of misfit, but never thought of autism/Asperger’s. What do you suggest?

    Reply
  18. Matt

    I was diagnosed with AS some 10 years ago and I scored 40 on this test, so it is accurate.
    I take these tests every now and then just so I know that I still have Asperger’s and I’m not going insane.

    Reply
  19. K.A.

    Regardless of the score I have to highlight that diagnosis is done by a professional. For example, I’ve scored 36. I am socially awkward and I’m currently doing two post-graduate degrees, also I don’t do romantic relationships as I don’t understand them. In any case, one of my parents is a psychologist specialised on the intellectually disabled. Long story short, I was never diagnosed and probably never will be. Although, I’ve got a really good IQ score and I am rather quirky that doesn’t mean I’m de facto an aspie.

    Reply
  20. Bobbi

    Having recently had my 6yr old son diagnosed with Aspergers and myself undertaking a specialised course as a parent, I decided to do the AQ test, especially as I did struggle at schools and have failed work due to illnesses and depression. Well, my result is 48. Should I raise this with my GP? I am currently unable to work due to be severely disabled by ME and Fibromyalgia and wondered if the test result is a very strong indicator of having ASD and therefore if can be officially diagnosed add this to my disability and if I am too old to get help?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Bobbi
      Thank you for sharing your comment on our website.

      It is often a greater benefit for children and young people to be diagnosed as they can learn skills that will help them to relate and cope better in the world that we live in.

      In answer to your question about getting a diagnosis for yourself, I do not have a simple answer. In truth, it needs to be a decision that you make yourself.

      What I can say is that it may be a good idea to discuss it with your family and also with your family doctor. Once you bring it up then you can discuss your options and decide on the best way to move forward.

      I wish you all the very best in your decision.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  21. Justin

    I’m a 33yr old male from Ontario, Canada and my score was 46. This doesn’t come as a surprise although I have found it very difficult to find someone, somewhere that can diagnose me without having to sell an organ.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Justin 🙂

      I hear what you are saying. Getting a diagnosis is certainly often not that easy or inexpensive. Frustrating, but true.

      You may find this website helpful: http://autismcanada.org/

      I truly wish you all the very best.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  22. Luisa

    I got a score of 31.
    When I was a kid, of about 8, my parents took me to a children psychologist, because they thought I was too involved in my interests (I used to love to know everything about every type of mineral and fish on the planet, and I used to carry around with me a huge notebook with all the information. My parents sent me to a summer camp, but I refused to interact with the other children, I spent hours and hours with my notebook and my rocks). This psychologist, however, said that there was nothing wrong with me. A kid used to bother me at school and I bit him on the arm. Nobody noticed though, so I didn’t get punished or anything (I know, it sounds like the plot of that show, but I swear when I saw that, I thought “That is so me!” but then it came out that the kid had Asperger’s, so I started to worry).

    As a teenager, my social interactions are difficult at best. I have 8 people I can call friends, and I’ve known all of them for more than 10 years. I hate social situations which involve new people, or many people. I like to hang out with my friends in small groups of three or four people at a time. My birthdays, which is when I have them all with me, are always a stressful experience.

    I force myself to look people in the eyes, because I’ve read somewhere that it’s a sign of confidence, but I hate it.

    My mother often calls me “detached” and “cold”. When my grandfather died, five months ago, she scolded me because I was able to go on with my life like nothing had happened. My grandfather had practically raised me and he lived in my house until the day he died.

    When my friends go through a breakup and they feel sad, I am always very awkward and I don’t know what to say to them, because I really cannot understand how they are feeling. But I try, god knows I try. I jam just not able to understand how they can feel so much, it is beyond me.

    I use the computer from 2.00pm to 4.00pm, and if I have to do something else in that chunk of time, I feel weird and annoyed for the rest of the day, and I cannot use it in another moment of the day, because it would be too strange. When they changed the programs on TV when I was a kid I stayed upset for a few days (now I seldom watch TV, so I wouldn’t know how I’d react).

    I live in fear that my parents kept something from me, hoping it would go away with age (I’ve read that like 20% of people with Asperger’s can lose some of it with time).

    Sorry for my English, it is not my native language (I’m Italian), I’ve studied it for 8 years but I’m not sure I’ve reached a good level.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Luisa
      I am sorry to hear of the recent loss of your grandfather.

      My experience is that we all process loss and other experiences in our lives differently. But I guess many times we expect others to act and behave in the same way that we would. This is often not beneficial. As in the case with your mother expecting you to react in a certain way that she understands.

      Anyway, I truly appreciate you opening up and sharing your own life and experiences here.

      Your English is a very good level as well. 🙂

      Take care and all the very best.
      Justine

      Reply
  23. Dominic

    Dear Justine,
    so many many posts I have read that I think – that’s me! Or nearly me. I started replying to one then saw more and more,. I have scored a borderline, and understand it’s not a long term testing procedure but the common factors keep cropping up. For me, I have grown in dealing with people quite successfully (I used to blush and hyperventilate around close people) and couldn’t think what to say (I still do this sometimes – what will I think of..? but see it as my personality and see the fun side of that which may help others).
    I may not of course have aspie but whether or not I do, see the abilities you do as YOU, makes you YOU. No one else like it! It focuses on the negative stuff: frustration, embarrassment, social ineptness feelings. It’s worked for me to build up the “fake normal” which others have mentioned. It’s not fake , for me anyway, it’s YOU, coping and being you, within certain situations. Everyone does it, aspergers or not. Anyway, Thanks for providing the website, the comments pages certainly brought a knowing tear to my eye and a great opportunity for potential and knowing aspie folks to support each other.
    best wishes,
    Dominic

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Dominic
      Thanks for your comment. 🙂 Glad you like the website.

      Be sure to come back and visit again.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
      • Charles

        I’ve had problems all my life and therapy never helped much. My current therapist thinks it’s possible that I have Asperger’s but can’t be sure, it might be my horrific childhood. I tried to be reasonable when I answered the test, and still got 34. If I had been completely truthful it would probably be higher. For what it’s worth, I’m a Doc Martin fan.

        Reply
  24. Dani

    I took this test out of curiosity, because I don’t remember the psych giving it to me when I was diagnosed in 2003. Considering my score, I’m no longer surprised that it took him one meeting of about an hour though – even if I am female and it’s harder for them to figure it out for us. I only got diagnosed because I was pregnant, and told the GP that they needed to look again because I wasn’t taking the anti-psychotics she had me on for schizophrenia anymore. Considering the scores I get on the mental health checks when I take them, I’m not surprised by the 41/50 score either. And still functioning. The MHC I took when I was feeling slightly suicidal had my GP ringing the psych herself, making an appointment for me for the next day then looking at me in amazement because I was the first person to score 18/20 on all three sections and NOT be borderline comatose.

    Reply
  25. Onyx

    I’ve gotten 37 twice. And these symptoms I’m reading seem to describe my behavior very well. I should look into this.

    Reply
  26. Chelsea

    Hello,

    I am a 16 year old girl in the US, and a few months ago my friend told me that I might have Aspergers. I went to see a psychologist but she said that even though I exhibit a lot of the symptoms that I just don’t seem autistic to her. She wasn’t entirely sure what the symptoms were, she had to pull out the DSM and look them up during the session. But I have heard that girls with Aspergers might be a bit more socially developed…

    It has been a couple of months since I saw that psychologist, but I started wondering again if I had it. I scored a 46 on this test. I know that’s pretty high, but does that just mean I inhibit some characteristics of Aspergers or should I try and find someone familiar with Aspergers to consult with?

    Thank you,
    Chelsea

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Chelsea
      I appreciate you sharing some of your own story. 🙂

      A good first point of research is a professional website from your local area or country. Here is one for the US that you can look at:
      http://www.usautism.org/

      You may considering using the Contact details on the website above. You can then ask them for more information on finding someone you can talk to in your local area.

      One advantage of contacting a professional organization such as mentioned above is that they specialize in this field of autism and autism spectrum disorders. Hence they can point you in the right direction.

      I hope that helps.

      God bless you. Stop back and let us know how you get on. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  27. Marcos Panelli

    Hi my name is Marcos, and I got 27 on the test. Since the start of secondary school, I have become socially awkward. I never used to be, and I never even began to think that I had autism, but now I’m not so sure. My primary school friends weren’t in my classes anymore, and we started to drift apart. These were the only friends that I had, and without them I felt alone. I wandered what it meant to be friends, and if it can be broken off just like that. Luckily I found a group of friends that I was able to talk comfortably with, but even then I get awkward when it’s a 1 on 1 conversation.

    I don’t know if the same thing will happen again. I sometimes feel like I’m switching personalities when I talk to different people, like I’m just imitating someone else. I don’t know what to do. I keep on switching between emotions, where one second I’m fine and then the next day I’m just depressed. I think people have always just thought I was cold, since I don’t show much emotion, but I just don’t know how to. My parents or anyone else that I know wouldn’t think that I have autism, but I got a 27 on the test, so it seems likely.

    One of my main problems is I find it difficult to laugh. People usually think I take things too seriously, or think I’m weird because everyone else is laughing, but I just don’t see whats so funny. I do laugh on occasions, but that’s rare in itself. I’m not very good at imitating a laugh, so I usually don’t. I also find it difficult to socialise or make new friends, and often feel exhausted after going out with friends. I’m not sure if this is like borderline autism or I’m just extremely introverted, but I’d like to know if I should see anyone about this. Thanks

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Marcos
      I always enjoy hearing from our visitors. So thank you for sharing your comments.

      Again, please keep in mind that this quiz is not a diagnosis! It may give an indication that further research needs to be done on the topic, but it does not say either way if you are on the autism spectrum or not.

      One good place to begin gathering further accurate information on autism and aspergers is to search online.

      Search for “aspergers” or “autism” and then where you live.
      For instance, “autism USA” or “aspergers Canada” etc depending on your location in the world.

      Then look for a professional organization website for your country or region. eg http://www.usautism.org/ for USA or http://www.autism.org.uk/

      You can then contact them organizations and ask for further information in your local area.

      I hope that this information helps you.

      I wish you all the very best for the future Marcos. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  28. Caleb

    I scored a 40 on this test. Im 38 years old. I was in the US Navy for almost 11 years. Im a licensed engineer by the USCG as a merchant mariner. I have always found getting along with people hard and understanding how others think weird. As a child i collected baseball cards and cataloged them and even wrote which ones i still needed and put them in numerical order. But other parts of my life were chaotic, i went throuh drugs use but never completely addicted. I have always had a addictive personality ie.. Gambling and drinking always. I always liked playing RPG even still to this day i like gaming. I never had many friends and i still dont.

    I have been through 2 divorces and im married now again. We have a daughter who we think might have austism cause shes 3 years old and still not speaking only making sounds but she is so smart we ask her colors and she knows she remembers me telling her things that i said no too. She understand when shes doing something she cant that we so no she stops and acknowledges us. So that got me thinking about myself and if i have some form of austism. I also love numbers i consider myself a numbers guy not words i dont like words word puzzles. Sudoku is one of the best games i ever played i love i like firguring out the combinations of what doesnt go vise what should go its easier for me. Anyways im hoping i can get some advise on me and my daughter at what steps to take next.

    Also i have always been super high energy some say im wired 440. But i was told i should have been diagnosed as ADD or ADHD as a child but never was. Still i am hyper and i love energy drinks i would rather be sped up than slowed down. I sleep normally but cant sit still very long unless playing game or watching tv or movies that interest me.

    Also it really bothered me that i had to scroll down 397 responses to be able to make my post. Can you put the posting area up at the top instead??? Thanks.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Caleb
      Thanks for commenting. 🙂

      I hear what you are saying about scrolling down through all of the other comments to make your own comment. I understand that can be frustrating.

      I have the newer comments at the top, but am limited by my theme with the box for visitors to leave new comments down at the bottom of the page. I do not know of any way to move this comment box up to the top of comments. Sorry about that.

      Anyway, I wish you all the very best and again feel free to drop by again. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
      • Adam

        Hello Justine,

        I am currently in the process of dealing with the stress on my personality from a marriage with a beautiful wife who has a past full of abuse. The intense emotional baggage she brought to our marriage and coping with that has accentuated my ADHD and tended me towards depression, but I have always been relatively cold. I have been toying with the idea of Aspergers for a while now, and the 26 I got on this test is about where I expected myself to fall.

        However, I am actually posting a comment for a different reason. I am currently a web developer for the company PerfectCube L.L.C. (I have linked the website in the provided field), and have worked on many forms of websites. At first glance, yours appears to be a WordPress site, in which case I may be able to help you with the comment box moving above the comments themselves. If you are interested, send me an email at the address I attached. I would send you my PerfectCube email, but I am terminating my employment there after 4 years to finish out my Computer Science degree. I simply cannot do the half school half work with my wife and two children.

        Anyway, let me know if you would like the help. It shouldn’t be much more than adjusting or creating a new template for the type of page that this results page is. Considering the purpose of this page, I don’t think I would expect to charge anything to make that happen. Thanks for either producing or maintaining such a service to help those struggling to better understand their lives and how to support those they love most.

        Reply
        • Justine

          Hi Adam
          Thank you for your kind offer to help out with moving the comment box up on the page. I appreciate your kindness.

          I will send you an email to see what can be done.

          Thanks again
          Justine 🙂

          Reply
  29. Taylor C

    Hi!

    The possibility of being an autistic recently came to light after I had looked up varying symptoms of dyslexia. I had struggled with math (learning phone numbers, dates, learning steps to an equations) since I was young and wondered if it could’ve been linked to dyslexia well instead I was brought to a website about autism the exact thing was called discaluia (I don’t know if I spelled that right or not.)

    A lot of the symptoms applied to myself when I was younger and some now. At around five I was diagnosed with ADHD and a friend of mine told me it was basically a “cousin” to autism. I used to make noises repetitively or repeat a certain word over and over again without even noticing. (I don’t do it anymore.) I was also pretty friendly as a child, I didn’t have trouble making friends. I do now. I can’t make eye contact, I don’t understand how start a conversation or how to end it (verbally and with a phone). Loud noises frighten me a lot and I get the feeling something bad will happen if it doesn’t stop. (I would cover my ears.) I don’t like going to new places alone, I get extremely anxious talking to employees for help or standing in line to buy things. I can understand things figuratively. Some jokes will go over my head and it’ll make quite awhile to understand. I’ve taken other online tests and scored around 32 or 31 and most of it was deemed, likely.

    But I’m just afraid I’m making a mountain out of a molehill. I’m not a hypochondriac but I do believe something’s…off. Either a severe case of learning disabilities or extreme SAD, I don’t know. Do you think these is enough cause to go get this checked out professionally?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Taylor
      Thanks for commenting. 🙂

      I will point you in the direction of professional organizational website such as http://www.autism.org.uk/ for UK
      http://www.usautism.org/ for US
      http://www.autismawareness.com.au/ for Australia
      Just to mention a few.

      Search for ‘autism’ and your local area or country to find such a website that may assist you in your quest for answers.

      I would then suggest that you contact the site and ask them for further information and direction.

      I hope this helps.

      All the very best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  30. Argante

    I’ve been trying since my oldest daughter was born to figure out what’s “wrong” with her, and for the last several years I’ve been trying to get one of her health care providers to evaluate her for Aspergers. They keep labeling her as different things and wanting to medicate her and move on. I think they’re wrong, and that her sensory, attention, and social issues are ASD. When my two younger kids started school and their behavior was called out also, I finally realized that Aspergers is hereditary and took the test myself. Several times. I scored in the 30’s each time (31-35 to be exact). I’ve always called myself an alien, and that the people around me are boring (they like talking about nothing) and stupid (they don’t obsessively learn about obscure subjects). I’m a 45 year old woman and an experienced performer, so I’m superb at masking my unacceptable traits. (Acting, gaming, and storytelling are very structured and make social interaction so much easier.) I don’t think anyone has ever suspected I’m an Aspie. Now I’ve made an appointment to get myself evaluated. If I have it as I suspect I do, hopefully the pediatricians will listen when I point out that my 3 “weirdo” kids probably have it too.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Argante
      I truly appreciate you opening up and sharing your comment.

      I also wish you the very best as you are evaluated and seek further information on autism spectrum disorders.

      It is certainly not always an easy path, but often knowing brings more peace than just wondering.

      Take care. You and your precious family are in my prayers.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  31. Anonymous

    Hi, I’m sorry I haven’t given a name, but I haven’t told anyone about my concerns yet. I’m thought I would turn to the community as you all seem to be in the same situation as me. I’m 15 years old and about to take my iGCSEs. I scored 45 on the test and I have the personality type INTJ. I’ve always know I was different and as I have gotten older, the gap between me and the other people my age has only increased. I haven’t told my parents because I am worried. Often they say things like “stop pretending to be autistic” but I can guarantee I am not. Who would pretend to do something like that? I just wanted to know if anyone has any advice on what to do. I don’t know if any GPs would ever take me seriously. Thank you, Annonymous

    Reply
  32. Ann

    Having 2 girls with Autism & a evident family history I just took the test & scored 46.
    I’m not actually surprised as I was always the awkward child who wasn’t able to make friends with my peers & had my head in books once my Grade 4 teacher taught me to read (yes I got good at hiding things as I didn’t want to disappoint it made me feel useless).
    I though could talk about my favourite loves for hours but had no friends to talk to. Some people were nice to me but I never really had proper friendships until I was an adult. I learnt to suppress a lot about myself to get through situations & to make acquaintances. A couple of who have become true friends.
    I love to focus on what I love to do but being a parent have learnt that things happen & I can come back to what I was doing.
    Now I just need to make the decision to have it formally diagnosed by my psychologist. Knowing & having confirmed are 2 very big differences for me to grapple with.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Ann
      Yes it is not an easy decision whether to seek out a formal diagnosis or not. Nor is the process always fast or simple.

      With the family history then it may, as you say, be worth following up to set your mind at ease and know for sure.

      I truly do wish you all the very best and pray it all works out well for you.
      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  33. Ellie

    Hello my native language is not english but ill try my best anyways.I have realized now at 25 years of age that i must have aspergers syndrome. But i have never gotten the slightest idea from any of my psycholofists during alll these years- how is that even possible? I was just treated with medication against depression. I really feel that this is what i have. I like routines, i take things literally, i cant bear publicplaces for too long, i must chargey energy-battery after a day at school,i don’t understand the social aspect of life so i had to imitate others and also ovserve the general rules which are invisible to me, i struggle making friends, i wont make eye contact with strangers, i hate superficial people, i like being alone, i overthink, i suffer from ocd,panikattacks and constant anxiety about life and my behaviour. I dont know if i love someone. I usually hate myself.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Ellie
      You have done very well with your English. 🙂 No worries there at all.

      I am not sure what to say in response to what you wrote, except that I know you are not alone in your experiences and struggles.

      Whether you are on the autism spectrum or not the other struggles are all still very real. I appreciate that.

      If you do want to pursue this topic further then I suggest that you google and search online for an organization in your local area or at least in your country of residence. Just search for “autism spectrum YOUR COUNTRY”. Where you replace YOUR COUNTRY with where you live. I hope this makes sense.

      See what you can find and contact them for further suggestions. They are sure to have someone that they can refer you to.

      I truly wish you all the very best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Ellen

      I could have written this myself exept I was eventually diagnosed as Bipolar. My experience with doctors is similar – prescribing anti-depressents for depression. All those SSRIs did was give me panic attacks.

      Reply
  34. Luke Pearce

    Hi
    I am 49 and I have 3 children with Aspergers, and other disorder that they have been diagnosis with as well. I have just taken the test for the fifth time, and come up with the same result every time. it is 38.

    Reply
  35. tracy kaufman

    I’ve ALWAYS been different and uncomfortable around people. My children have told me that I’m “socially awkward”. I’ve been chastised in public numerous times for being rude/inconsiderate. My pre-school teacher struggled to get me socially involved with the other kids to the point that she insisted on a “play date”. I was angry that this kid came into my home and that it was my responsibility to entertain him. I played alone all of the time. As soon as I was put into a social situation, I would freak out and hide. My mom admitted to me that she was never able to bond with me as a child. I was born a frank breach with the umbilical cord wrapped around my neck. I actively avoid eating with anyone else. I am a total mess. This is something that has completely controlled me and has dictated my life. I’ve been saying for years that I believe that I have Aspberger’s , and NO ONE will listen to me, although the same people will tell me over and over how weird and awkward I am. How do I find out the truth?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Tracy
      I appreciate you taking the time to share your own experiences. This is not always easy to do.

      It can be very difficult and painful to feel ‘weird’ and ‘an outsider’. I understand that. Especially when it is those that we love and care about who call us weird or at least treat us as if we are!

      As I have suggested to others, why don’t you do a specific search online where you search for “autism spectrum” followed by your local area or country? This should bring back some results that include organizations in your nation or area. You can then contact this organization and ask for their opinion on the next best step for you.

      I hope that this helps and I look forward to you coming by again to let us know how you get on.

      God bless you Tracy 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  36. Rednose

    Hi I’ve taken this test a few times over the past couple of years and normal score is 44 or 46 I always attributed the plus 2 to my depression, as I seem to take the test when I’m especially low! just took test again and scored 47 even though I’m not that depressed today.
    I’m 55 and approached my family doctor for a diagnosis around five years ago this turned out to be a complete waste of time, I wasn’t taken seriously at all. my wife pushed the issue and I had a home visit from the local mental health team, after talking to him for around five minutes he said ” I don’t know that much about Aspergers but I know they don’t make eye contact and you do, so you don’t have it” so I gave it up as a bad job!
    I found out around three years ago that my mother was told that I was autistic when I was 8 years old, this was brushed under the carpet probably due to stigma at the time.
    I’m 100% sure that I’m Aspergers but now don’t know if it’s worth pursuing a diagnosis or just plod on.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi 🙂
      Thanks for sharing your comment.

      I believe that we learn behaviors as we grow up and continue to learn even into adulthood. So looking people in the eye can also be a learned behavior.

      For someone who has to force themselves to look others in the eye it can be very exhausting and draining. I would not say that in every case it rules out someone as being on the autism spectrum.

      I truly wish I could tell you a quick and easy solution to your situation, but honestly I know of none.

      As I have mentioned in other comments, you could begin by searching online “autism spectrum YOUR COUNTRY” (eg USA, Canada, UK etc) and see what professional organizations you find in the results.

      It is not always needed to get a diagnosis. It is different for each individual. But since this seems to really be bothering you and your wife, I would suggest that you do search for an organization near you that specializes in working with those on the Autism Spectrum.

      Let us know how you get on.
      God bless you and your family.
      Justine

      Reply
  37. Teresa

    Justine,
    Thanks so much for your site. My brother is 53 years old and has never been diagnosed with AS. However, as I have learned more, I believe that this has been his issue for his entire life. The last few days, our family has been battling with my father who wants to disinherit my brother because he just won’t “apply himself”, keep a steady job, etc. Regrettably, when my dad and mom have passed, guess who will be left taking care of him without the extra resources my father’s inheritance would provide? My sister and I – who have our own children to take care of without having to support our brother. What a mess! I really like your online quiz. I will have my brother take it, but when I took it as I thought he would answer, the score was 46. I took it for myself and scored a 6. No wonder he makes me crazy! However, I am his sister and want him the best for him – even though I have no idea what that is. I’ll ask him to take the quiz and see what his answers are. Hopefully this will be a step in the right direction. He lives in the Kansas City, MO area. If you have any recommendations for professionals in that area, I would love a referral.
    My best,
    Teresa

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Teresa
      Thank you so much for sharing your comment.

      I am not able to give you a specific referral in that area. My suggestion would be to begin with this useful website: http://www.usautism.org/
      Contact them and see what they can tell you about Kansas City.

      Again I wish you and your family all the very best with finding out answers.

      God Bless you.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  38. Gawain

    Hi Justine,
    I have taken the test a number of times over the past few years, since my wife suspected I might have Aspergers.
    I always get high scores; the most recent was 44.
    However, people don’t generally think I do have Aspergers.
    Is it possible to score so high and Not have Aspergers? Is it likely to be something else?
    I wouldn’t say I have severe Aspergers so is it possible others just don’t notice it enough?
    Thanks,
    Gawain

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Gawain
      This quiz and the score you get are certainly not a diagnosis. They are just intended to give an indication that may prompt you to seek further professional advice.

      If you are concerned then I recommend that you begin with your family doctor and ask them for a referral to someone familiar with autism.

      I truly hope you find the answers you seek. 🙂

      Take care.
      Justine

      Reply
  39. Vida

    Can Asperger symptoms become more obvious with age??? I have always been quite shy, but when I was very young I didn’t have problem making friends (but I was always the listener – hardly ever the speaker). Now, at older age I have some issues adapting to new circles of people, to the point where I am being criticized by a school principle (I am a teacher) for being withdrawn from the circle of my coworkers… I am becoming more and more obsessed with numbers like dates of birth and etc. I am also totally obsessed with real life drama and detective stories. My score was 37… not sure what to think…

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Vida
      I wish that there was a simple answer to your question. I do know that we learn coping skills during life that may mask traits and indicators that may show up more readily in a child.

      But I honestly do not know the answer to your specific questions.

      If anyone else reading this has any thoughts on Vida’s question then please leave your comment below.

      God Bless you Vida. I do hope you find the answers you need.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  40. Gerben

    Hello,
    Thanks for creating this website! It’s because of this and similar websites that I understand a bit why I am different than others. About 15 years ago, when I had no internet, I didn’t have a clue, although I was sure I didn’t like social interaction, noise, physical contact, etc.
    I am a bit worried though. I see similar traits in the behaviour of my mother and oldest daughter. I’m worried about my daughter, and wonder if one day I should tell about my condition, which is perhaps also her’s, which is perhaps hereditary. I don’t know what is the best to do.
    I also wonder what will be the best advice if she wants to be a mom one day. Looking at pictures of my mother, when she hold me in her arms after the delivery, she looks like someone who’s totally out-of-this-world, because of the pain I guess, but not smiling, not like those mothers who in spite of all the pain look with a smile to their newborn child.
    To finish with something positive: One thing I liked in the test is the question: “I find it very easy to play games with children that involve pretending.” That’s really a lot of fun. I live in Holland and here we have a saying “elk nadeel heeft zijn voordeel” which means literaly “every disadvantage has it’s advantage”. Playing games that involve pretending seems to be one of these advantages.
    Greetings,
    Gerben

    Reply
  41. ARBA

    Hi (sorry for my English)
    I’m confused a bit, i scored 29 and don’t know what to think. I’m 45 and most of my life felt i don’t fit, but don’t want either to make impression i making it up to find excuses for just being said miserable person. I never went for any diagnosis as felt uncomfortable about it. I live in relationship and have a daughter, i have a job and never needed help to find one but in social life i find it hard to have friends. In conversation or chit chats i always could to switch off just like that loosing control over the conversation floating to never-land. Only have few friends but even though i feel insecure all the time. Got that strange feeling i don’t deserve their friendship.
    The score itself doesn’t proof anything and i don’t know how to find myself.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi 🙂
      Thank you for sharing your own experiences and struggles.

      I can certainly relate to the difficulty in finding and relating to friends. I wish there was an easy way to find friends and to develop strong friendships, but honestly this is not an area of strength in my own life.

      Yes. You are correct the score from the quiz does not prove anything. It may only be an indicator. Even then please take the quiz results carefully and seek further advice from a professional who is familiar with autism spectrum disorders.

      Take care. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  42. Angel

    Just thought I would try it. My son is waiting on Diagnosis its been almost 7 years now. I’m 41 Female and scored 37 but I dont think I have ASD as I am very different from my son. Plus the Consultant didnt think so. I do have a lot of issues, I dont have friends and I dont go outside much. I find the world difficult but I did have a bad childhood so its probably that. Anyway cant change now the thought of it terrifies me.

    Reply
  43. Tiana Ewing

    Hello Justine,
    Thank-you very much for the quiz you have made. I am currently 14 years if age (not an adult just yet, I know, but I couldn’t find a younger aged quiz) and my test score was 35.I’m seeing a psychologist, and my Mother told me she doesn’t believe anything is there other than anxiety. I haven’t had too many appointments with her yet, but would it be necessary/important to address this possible matter? Before I mentioned something along the lines of possible PTSD, and she seemed rather displeased so I wish not to upset her, so should this concern be addressed?
    Thank-you for your time, I hope you have a fantastic life.
    Tiana.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Tiana
      I appreciate you taking the time to visit our website and to leave your comment. 🙂

      It is hard to give a quick answer to your question. I understand that you do not want to upset the psychologist.

      At the same time it is bothering you and hence may be worth considering mentioning your concerns to the psychologist. Give it some careful thought anyway.

      I hope you stop back here again and let us know what you decided to do.

      Take care and God Bless you,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  44. Benji

    Hello Justine,

    Thanks for this!

    My mum has always wondered if I have aspergers tendencies…
    I scored 27.

    Is this worth getting diagnosed?
    For me, I am great socially, and quite extroverted. However, in conversations with close friends, I can get very picky on wrong details. For example, a friend of mine insisting on a time of an event being earlier than what I am saying. I constantly point out to him my evidence (referring to the host of the events post) and also my screenshot evidence of me messaging the host confirming the time. Being correct in the situation, I continue to hammer this point as it irritates me, even when it’s my close friend, that they just wont accept the very evident point!
    The chat turned rather personal from his side- yet I strongly wanted to continue hammering the evident point over a silly matter of an event time.

    I’ll be interested as to what you think of this 🙂
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Benji 🙂
      Thanks for your comment. I appreciate you taking time to leave it.

      All I can really say is that if it is bothering you or your mum then it may be worth seeking out a diagnosis. You can always begin by talking to your family doctor and asking for their opinion and perhaps a referral.

      It honestly is not possible to diagnose yourself or to rely on the quiz result.
      So I recommend that you talk to your mum. Then decide what you both think is the best path to take. 🙂

      I truly wish you all the best in your journey to discovering answers.

      God richly bless you. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  45. Leonie

    I did this test and scored 28, which places me on the autistic spectrum. Being 67, I have never had a diagnosis of autism, but all my childhood I lived with the certain knowledge that I was somehow “different” to almost all the children around me. I later became the mother of two sons, widely apart in age, but both “on the spectrum”, and both now diagnosed as such. As well as my two grandchildren.

    In many ways, I am ordinary, but a bit “weird”. I think that now that I am well beyond the years of being persecuted at school for the differences, most people fail to recognise me as autistic. I know that I can be a terrible bore, but I have improved at recognising the symptoms of boredom in others. One can learn to be more sensitive to these sorts of things.

    The most important comments that I want to make about this test apply to both me and my sons.
    I notice that everything that pertains to rote learning is scored high. We, all three, are hopeless at it. We can calculate things, and reinvent systems, but none of us can remember sing-song information. The alphabet, for example, has no system to it, so it is meaningless and can’t be remembered. Words that are not phonetic are also meaningless, until one has learnt that in fact they ARE phonetic in some other system, say French, Italian or Middle English. My children and I could not learn maths tables by rote. I taught them basic maths with a large abacas, so that they saw the pattern and recognised a system in it. Remembering peoples’ birthday dates is meaningless, unless there is an interesting co-incidence with world history. My maternal Grandmother was born on the same day as Adolph Hitler and Charlie Chaplin. Now, that is interesting because her personality was something between the two. I remember people’s zodiacal sign because there is a sort of system to it.

    On the other hand, all the scoring on this test marks imagination low. One scores a point for answering “rarely” to the question of whether one played imaginary games as a child. My response is to ask what one is supposed to do within ones headspace except imagine things. One is dependent upon imagination to solve problems. In my family, we all imagine things. We imagine we are a meercat, so we watch them carefully at the zoo and then frisk around in the same manner. We imagine we are a Scottish bagpiper, so we interview a piper at the Anzac Day parade, find out how the bagpipes work, then march up and down the backyard banging on a bucket and making loud squawking noises. We imagine we own a beautiful guitar but we can’t afford it, so we buy a template instead, and build it from scratch. We are very imaginative people, and I think that, contrary to the indications of this test, that many people on the autistic spectrum have this sort of imagination in common.

    For me, this is partly to do with having excellent visual memory. As a poet and painter, I see things, and translate vision directly into words or drawings. I also observe body language to a degree common in dogs but not common in humans. I see that other autistic artists can do this; they can draw, often from memory, figures that indicate through their posture the subtle nuances of emotion, or physical state of wellness.

    To cut imagination out of the common characteristics of a person with Asperger syndrome seems much in error to me. If I gave myself a plus point for every question involving imagination, I would score highly.

    Part of what this is about is system. We (in my family at any rate) store meaningful data and process it into concepts. We collect the small stuff, put it into a systematic order, look to see if a pattern emerges. If it doesn’t, we rearrange the data, mentally, until it does. That gives us the big picture. A concept, or formula that can be applied to other sets. But to do this, one needs to know how to use the “if” concept. “if” is what takes imagination. Once you have sorted out the “if” concept, than you are ready to answer “Why?” which is the question that Muggles are often quite good at asking.

    Reply
    • Susan D.

      Dear Leonie,
      I think you and your family are awesome. I enjoyed reading about your adventures and your extraordinary creativity. I agree that a challenge can be a gift as well. I just scored 27 on the test, which gives me a “borderline” ranking, but at least it’s a clue to something. I am a poet and a therapist. I am grateful for the ability to identify with people on the spectrum, and relieved to know it’s not “just” my imagination that I am more sensitive than others, etc. Blessings and best wishes to you and your family, and thank you Justine for this useful and compassionate website. Your comments are kind and professional, and I have enjoyed reading them.

      Reply
      • Dominic

        Dear Leonie and Susan, out of the posts here both of yours resonant with me. I was painfully shy but have “learned” to be outgoing and extrovert when situation arises. Usually just when with one or two very close people. It’s akin to acting, therefore creative so I think the creativity point Leonie makes is quite valid. I do go back and read sentences over again in case I missed something (it takes me months to finish a book!). I am definitely very sensitive Susan, taking things personally and always analysing and worrying but able to figure out what is going on with people’s glances, body language etc. I was put onto the idea I may be borderline when my dad said recently he doesn’t know anyone like me, like I can come out with things that other people wouldn’t. He said it in a good way so I think being possibly autistic or having Aspergers is a positive good thing, despite all the awkwardness and social pain we have experienced through life. I am 45 and truly believe I may be one of “us”. I think I should investigate it more..incidentally Leonie, I am from Scotland and no shortage of bagpipers here!
        Dominic

        Reply
    • Dominic

      Dear Leonie, I have replied to your comment via Susan who commented on yours, below.
      Take care, Dominic

      Reply
  46. Rachel

    Hi! My name is Rachel, I am 44 and currently reside in SC. I scored 40 on your quiz, and have taken two other online asperger’s tests which also concluded that I have asperger’s. I will definitely be talking to my doctor about this at my next appointment! An asperger’s diagnosis would certainly explain a lot about me. Especially thinking about all the things people have said to me about me from childhood to the present! Thank you for your quiz!

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Toni
      As I have mentioned in previous comments, a good place to begin is by talking with your family doctor.

      It is important to find a professional that is familiar with autism and spectrum disorders. You doctor may be able to point you to such a person.

      Thanks again for commenting.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  47. Bev

    Hi Justine,
    I am a 50+ grandmother of a 3 year old boy recently diagnosed with ASD. Studying on this subject I was shocked to see the symptoms that were very familiar to me. I have taken your test, and scored 40. At my age I am wondering if it is worth getting diagnosed, but I also thought it might be helpful, especially for his parents. I was diagnosed with Candida 20 years ago, & was put on a special yeast-free diet. This has helped me tremendously with my mood swings, behavior, and concentration, so I would like them to try this with my grandson.
    If I had the diagnoses it might help to encourage them.

    Reply
  48. Ini

    Hello Justine,

    Thanks for such an informative site. I can relate with a lot of what most people have written especially Jo. Day dreaming is my life and play acting scenarios – real and unreal, prospective and retrospective is my expertise. It drains me but I cannot help it. Almost every scene of my life is acted in my head prior to and after it happens, and I beat myself up when I think of what I may have done wrong in a past scene. I also try to read meanings into people’s actions and words finding faults where possible and blaming myself for being different. In fact, it was like Jo knew most of the things I do in secret and of course the ones I cannot hide even when I am pretending to be normal. I love my house and adore my bed and I have been indoors so much especially on my bed that it worsened my arthritis due to lack of exercise.
    My score was 46 and my son has a diagnosis of autism. After my son’s diagnosis, I was able to relate to him as I could see most of my self in him. However, it never crossed my mind to get a diagnosis as I felt I could manage ok – in my head of course. Recently, I have had to terminate my Phd studies due to health reasons but moreso because of the traditional learning structure which I have struggled with all of my life and which became so frustrating with the Phd because no one around me understood why I couldn’t understand, see the big picture, work out the answer without going through it step by step and of course I became a burden to the research group in the words of my supervisor. I have blamed myself for not being able to do it but sometimes I think I did the wrong programme. I love my house and will happily stay indoors for 1 year with my husband and kids but I need a career that I can enjoy and pursue and execute my responsibilities. I am a nervous wreck because of this, been depressed silently for years now except for my husband who knows but have gotten by with God’s strength. Please will a formal diagnosis help me identify the best course of action with respect to career choice for me and generally moving on? I have a BSc, an MSc and probably will obtain an mphill if I can write up this work but I still do not know what to do with my life especially when I think of all the difficulties I face and will face with social interaction, changing routines and dealing with the assumptions that plague our every day life. I love organising things and planning out things, projects and so on but I have lost every confidence in myself due to this recent situation. I know I am bright and a lot of people tell me that but truly I am a nervous wreck who needs help. People on the outside see the opposite though because I pretend to be someone else. Recently things have happened that my defence wall has fallen apart in school and I felt really exposed and it was really terrible. Not sure how long my defences in public will hold. Please how do I move forward from here. I appreciate any suggestions.
    Many thanks and God bless

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      I truly appreciate your honesty and sharing your own struggles.

      My recommendation to you is to go and talk to your family doctor. Your doctor may be able to advise you directly or else may be able to point you in the right direction to someone who is more able to assist you.

      God Bless you too. I do honestly hope you find the answers you are looking for.
      Justine

      Reply
  49. Amanda

    Growing up I had cousins who used to joke about me having autism. It never bothered me, but I never fully understood what it was. As long as I can remember I’ve always been the “shy” girl. Found it hard to make/keep conversations, and envied those who could do it so effortlessly. When I would make friends they would just fade away, and to this day, I have no idea how any of my old friends “unfriended” me. When I dropped out of high school sophomore year I pursued online classes and got my diploma that way. Since I’ve turned 18 I’ve found a lot of things getting harder for me, college is incredibly difficult for me. When I started my first semester I was excited, but as the weeks go by it gets harder and harder eventually leading to me dropping most of my classes. The only classes I ever stayed in were computer classes (I love computers and technology) so they were the only ones I ever stayed in. Even for my love of computers though I still find it difficult pursuing a specific major and constantly change it. I’m just generally not interested in school, I know it’s something I should do, but my personal interests always take over my life more than anything else. And when I gain a new interest I drop everything and it becomes an obsession. My main obsession is video games, I’ve been playing them since as long as I remember and have never stopped. I become so involved in the stories, characters, and game mechanics. I often find myself replaying some games over and over. Try to find every item, collectible, do everything 100% and learn every last detail about it. Of course I never thought about these things until I became an “adult” and people stopped telling me what I need to do. I started to find that doing “adult” things was hard. Going into a bank and making a simple deposit, making a phone call to an insurance company, going to job interviews. I found myself thinking “why do I do this?” even getting really upset and frustrated with myself because everyday tasks for everyone else were so draining for me. After thinking a bit I started to wonder “do i really have autism?” so i looked into every article, took every quiz and by the looks of it I have some sort of autism spectrum disorder. And honestly since I’ve been doing this research (for about a year now) I realized that if I do have aspergers/autism.. that’s both frightening, and relieving. Frightening, because I really am just that weird girl who plays video games all day. But relieving because there’s finally an answer to everything. Like to why talking on the phone is so difficult, why I can’t keep eye contact with people, why I don’t like people who i’m not close with to touch me. And in all of this I’ve also come across other peoples comments about their lives and living with it, hearing that there are other people that struggle with the same thing I do brings me comfort in a weird way. It’s even help me become a little more social and willing to try new things.. even if it is just an act I put on so I seem “normal”. I don’t have an official diagnosis.. I would like one though. But I don’t know if I’ll ever have to guts to go out and seek a real answer. I got a 41 on this test. Maybe some day I’ll get a real answer. 🙂

    Reply
  50. Daniel

    Dear Justine,
    Thankyou for making this test available, my wife asked me to do this test, we have been married for 33 years, and she has had to put with me all this time, my score is 37, obviously this is significant, and I will need to follow this up, as I had no idea I had aspergers, but I knew I looked at things differently to most people, thanks again. Dan

    Reply
  51. Elena

    Hello, Justine!
    Thank you very much for those tests! I have 45 years and I realize from childhood that I am different, but have no idea that I have Asperger Syndrome or Autism. I’m gonna consult a doctor very quickly.
    I’m from Romania, so please, excuse my self learn language.
    Thank you again! God bless you!

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Elena
      So glad to hear that you like this website. I truly appreciate your comment.

      You also have done very well with your English. 🙂

      God Bless you too.
      Justine

      Reply
  52. Phil

    I saw a psychiatrist about Aspergers, one who had diagnosed my partner with the same syndrome, and found them to be not very interested in ‘hard cases’. If it’s not black and white then they don’t seem prepared to engage much further. However I have been diagnosed with ADHD by a different psychiatrist and the symptoms do seem to accord a little better with my daily life. Yet something still doesn’t feel right. I should say that I really do not need an Aspergers diagnosis to make me feel better about myself but I DO need to understand why I’ve struggled for so long in social situations in every possible way imaginable yet have no problem being left alone with my own special interests (or hobbies if you prefer not to use jargon).
    It seems to me that there may be a very grey area between the quiet sort of aspie who is fairly happy to be left alone in their own little world and the inattentive ADHD-er who presents in a similar-ish way. Perhaps it is a matter of degree of severity of impairment that separates these two presentations but I wonder if, in the near future, there may be voices seeking to link these two conditions much more closely. I have read Diane M. Kennedy’s work on linking ADHD and autism and find some of it convincing and some not so much. Temple Grandin has written a preface to Kennedy’s book but it’s over ten years old and so a generation ago in terms of awareness and research.
    Any thoughts on this matter Justine?
    (My score on the scale was 42).

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Phil 🙂
      Yes I agree that a diagnosis is not always the best solution. As you say, you do not need it to make you feel better about yourself.

      But understanding why difficulties arise in social situations certainly can be a helpful blessing. I fully agree with that.

      Keep in mind too that it is possible in many cases for a person to have more than one condition or disorder. Also totally true is the fact that we are all individuals, all made to be unique and special in our own way.

      Hence yes it can be more difficult to come to a clear and concise diagnosis in some cases than in others. I wish this was not the case, but it is.

      I honestly do not know the answer to your question on research linking ADHD and Autism more closely together. I would love to hear from other visitors as to your own experiences with this topic. Please reply and leave your comment here.

      Take care, Phil and God richly bless you. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
    • Sandy

      Hi Justine, I am no way a professional, I am simply a Mum with a daughter with autism, 2 with aspergers, 2 step daughters with aspergers and a husband who is the most typical case of aspergers possible 🙂 But I would like to give you my opinion, if that’s ok? I found there are some huge differences between autism and aspergers, but some very common traits as well! (particully high functioning) And your right, it is very hard to find someone to help with a diagnose as an adult. ADHD and autism are very different! ADHD is (I believe) is a naturally higher energy level, which I think is to do with a chemical inbalance with in the body, autism is the way you brain functions. It can be seen in a catscan the different parts of the brain that shows activity….. but if you are a little excitable, loud, full of energy, talk a lot or quickly, and a little over the top, then I can see how it can be related to one and another. There may also be the lack of attension (or maybe it’s just that you are thinking of too many things at once.) Without knowing anything about you, that it was I can think of that would be mainly relatable. While someone with aspergers are usually quiet and prefer to be on their own, someone with high functioning autism is usually very interactive.

      Personly, I found that having a diognoses as a child is helpful because of the assistance with education. When my partner was diognosed at 35, I was asked what would we like to do about it? And I responded with “I guess nothng!” I have lived with my husband for 15years, and like with any relationship we had already learned to work arround each others habbits (now labled as cod), and worked out each others reasons for being different from one and another. So personally, I would simply research the traits a little, so that you both understand “why” you do things differently and perhaps so that your family can understand why certain things are so important to you, but at the end of the day, you fell in love with the each other just the way you are, so a lable won’t change a thing!

      I hope that my years of experience will be helpful, but if not thats ok 🙂 I found listening to different people was educational to see how many variations of symptoms there are and different ways familys live with it, was very helpful to learn and understand my family a bit better.

      Good luck Justine, I wish well and find the answers you’re looking for

      Reply
  53. Bob

    Thanks for creating this website.

    Many people have social problems because they are shy, and I was extremely shy as a child. I talked so little they said something was wrong with me but my family weren’t the kind to seek treatment other than for something life threatening. So had many problems with social problems and always sought to be alone, like being in forest. But it was when I saw on the internet that Aspergers also involves sound. The blinking and loud sound of game shows or anything like that was always very irritating. Also would notice sounds that no one else would hear. That’s when I thought I might have this syndrome. My score was borderline. Thanks for at least giving me an indication that this is something I should seek further information on.

    Thanks again!
    Bob

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Bob
      I am glad you like the website. 🙂 Thanks for expressing that.

      I also find sounds irritating. Also often hearing sounds that others seem to not really hear. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
      • Cassie

        In searching for information for my grandson who we suspect may have Autism ( he has a half brother who has Autism), I came across this site, and having taken the test myself and scored 36, I am quite shocked to find that I may have Aspergers myself and this may more closely reflect my grandsons traits also.

        Reply
        • Justine

          Hi Cassie
          It is great to have you visit this site and leave your comment.

          It sounds like it would be a very good idea to have your grandson professionally diagnosed to see if your suspicions are correct.

          I truly do wish you all the very best with the diagnosis and the future. 🙂

          Many Blessings,
          Justine

          Reply
  54. Tom

    I scored 44, unsurprising as I was diagnosed with Asperger’s in 2008. I’m lucky enough to have an excellent local support service, and have met a lot of other people with ASD at this point. The interesting thing is that they are all different people with different personalities, though some have similar traits.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Tom 🙂
      Thanks for sharing your score and comment.

      Glad you stopped by our site.
      Take care.
      Justine

      Reply
  55. Jo

    Hi!
    I’m 33, and I scored a 33 (nice and symmetric, and 33 happens to be a number I obsessed about in my teens).

    I’ve been wondering about whether or not I’m on the autism spectrum for … well, years, really – but only recently begun to think it’s actually true. I’m happily married and have two wonderful children, and tend to function very well in social situations, and I think I’m even quite good at chit chat – however there are several clues pointing to me not being quite like everyone else. Well, scoring a 33 is a good indicator too, I suppose.

    Initially I thought I was just very introverted, and discovering the introvert/extrovert spectrum has been very liberating for me. Social occasions make me exhausted and I need several days to recover from big to-do’s. Also I love staying at home rather than going to parties, I like silence, and all my interests and carreer choices point in one direction – that I prefer being alone. Prior to first reading about introvertism, I remember in particular one time in university when my housemates were all going out, and I sat in my room crying because I couldn’t understand why I didn’t want to go out with them. I also remember throughout my 20’s having a vague sort of plan to become “more social” and “the center of attention” because I saw these things as a sign of success and accomplishment. I now know that trying to be those things would most definitely not make me happy!

    However, there’s more to the story. Despite having developed my own skills for coping, I feel different most of the time when I’m with groups of other people. I am at times very self-aware. But I also get lost in my own thoughts to the point where one time, in a college class, I was patted on the shoulder and “woke up” to a classroom where everyone was laughing good-humoured at me because people had been trying to get my attention for a while. I remember that in this class we were working on a self portrait (I have a degree in fine art), and looking at this self portrait today I’d say I’ve captured myself wearing the most magnificent “resting bitch face” of all time! I’ve been the quirky one, I’ve followed my own fashions, I tend to break with stereotypes and expectations. I obsess over subjects or interests, and have learned that these interests may have a peak and then drop after a while, after which I no longer feel any interest in them. Others stay with me – like knitting, a skill I practice several hours a day if I can! I have benefited tremendously from this ability to obsess, and have taught myself for instance how to use computer programs like Photoshop and Premiere, I’ve made my own websites, certainly how to knit and sew and several other practical skills. I do also obsess over films and tv shows, which I suppose is less beneficial, but certainly fun. Our age of streaming and Netflix fits my tastes perfectly, because I prefer watching only one tv show at a time. Right now I’m into Supernatural. And of course I have knitting stitch markers with a Supernatural theme while knitting a Supernatural inspired shawl together with other Supernatural fans on Ravelry. Other knitters will understand.

    When interacting with others – that is, in face-to-face conversation – I often feel less skilled or “intelligent” when talking about “women’s subjects” – you know, how Karen felt when her mother said that thing to her daughter, or what do you think was the true meaning behind that comment from Peter, or whatever. Here I tend to grasp for clichês. I have one particular friend who likes to discuss this kind of things in great detail, but I have a hard time keeping up interest. Which makes me feel stunted and callous. I prefer problems that can be solved at once, in a practical manner, rather than mulling over issues that may or may not be resolved. However, ask me about anything to do with my profession, or areas in which I am skilled, and I can happily chat about it for a long time. I do, however, remember that I should let other people talk and that I might be seen as annoying if I hog the conversation, but this is somehting I need to be conscious about – it does not come naturally to me! I also need to be conscious about eye contact and remember to not only look at one eye, but occasionally look at their other eye as well! At other times I simply can’t help myself, and talk more than others, and I spend quite some time afterwards being annoyed with myself. I have become better at fine-tuning this, however, and believe I make the impression in others at being very knowledgeable. Which I am, but only in the subjects that interest me. I live in “fear of being found out”! The eye contact thing is a bit of an issue for me – I much prefer talking to my husband in bed with the lights off, or when we’re driving in the car. In the early days of our marriage he had a habit of looking at me lovingly over the dinner table, and i literally quailed under what for me was an intense stare. I had to tell him to stop! Now that we have two children to keep an eye on, this is no longer an issue.

    I have a tendency to play out verbal fights with people in my mind. It feels like practicing for a real fight if I should happen to end up in a real fight one day. It tires me out and makes me edgy, but I have in the last few years begun to recognize this type of negative thought patterns and try to snap out of it if I can.

    After having children, new areas of social interaction opened. Every day I pick my children up from kindergarten and I have to interact with other parents and the staff. All of which makes me uncomfortable. I use my kids as a “shield”, that is – a subject for conversation. My kids get invited to birthday parties, and I encourage my husband to take them there – he has come back several times and told me he was the only dad present at the party. But a kid’s party, with other parents I only half know, with lots of movement and noise, tires me out and makes me confused. Just the other weekend we had my siblings and their children visiting, and though we were outside, the sheer number of people (a whopping 5 adults and 7 children!) were enough for me to just stand there and not knowing where to begin. Thankfully my husband is understanding and he knows now that I need clear instructions for what to do. He might come over, put his arm around me and say “hey honey, why don’t you go make some coffee?”. This way I have something hands-on to do, and I also get a moment to myself in the kitchen to collect my thoughts.

    There are, however, a few things about me that do not fit the Asperger “norm”. For example, I believe my face is very animated when I talk. I also have a lot of inflexion in my voice. I smile and laugh a lot, and make other people laugh. In addition, I am happy to let people hug me – at least I think I am … I do not hug people, but I let them hug me. I do hug my husband, though. And my kids. I suppose I become aware of body contact when it occurs, but I don’t feel very adverse against it – I’m just aware of it.

    But it is certainly true that I have few friends, and that I’m bad at keeping in touch with the ones I have. I am lucky to have a best friend who, though we might not speak in months, I fall right back in the old jargon with whenever we do meet. She understands me and know how I work, and also – in another nice, symmetrical way – we share the same first name.

    I also have a strong dislike of the telephone, and rarely answer or call back – I prefer emails and text messages. If I have to call someone, or worse – am waiting for a call from someone I don’t know and I can’t predict how the conversation will go, I’m a nervous wreck. The only ones I regularly talk to on the phone are my mother and my husband. I might feel elated after a successful phone conversation, but quickly start looking for “errors” in the way I spoke, in what I said etc.

    Well, this got a bit long and rambling. I’m just starting to understand this, though I’ve been on the way to understanding for many years already. I don’t know if I’m going to seek further diagnosis, though it would be relieving to be able to say “I am the way I am because I have Asperger syndrome”. I am also worried that this might make others relate to me differently. So I’ll just bide my time, I think.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Jo 🙂
      Thank you for sharing your comment and own life’s journey. It is always a pleasure to read our viewers comments and thoughts.

      I also find that I feel more comfortable (less pressured or stressed) replying via texts or emails as opposed to phone calls. 🙂 Some how it is less intimidating.

      Anyway, I loved reading your story. So thank you and all the very best for the future. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
    • Tammy

      Dear Jo:

      Thank you for sharing your story. So much of what you said resonates with me. I truly understand!

      Tammy

      Reply
  56. Jason

    I scored 47. I learned recently that when I was in elementry school, my teacher suspected autism but one of my parents refused to allow any form of testing to be done because they thought that would make it go away. Now at 19 I am having conversations with doctors about it and having to not only educate them about autism but explain something that I feel is obvious because they don’t seem to think I could possibly have autism because I can hold a conversation. That isn’t how autism works…

    Reply
    • Esme

      Dear Jason:
      I´m more or less the same age as you and also have mental problems.

      So often parents are emotionally/psichologically ignorant (you can have a PhD and still be illiterate in mind matters).
      Also, many of them are inflexible about keeping their “perfect wonderful child” image; we´re adults, and we have mental problems.
      Mental health issues also happen to “us”, not only to the neighbour´s weird kid.

      Denying reality only delays recovery, the moment we gain awareness of our issues and start seeking help.
      Also, being suffering deeply and kept being said “you´re fine, everyone´s like that a bit, and no one´s really happy or healthy” doesn´t help at all; it´s very hurtful being going through hell and having someone in your face saying you´re not drowning.

      I´m glad you can afford doctors (we´re so lucky, many people like us can´t) and your main issue has been diagnosed.
      Also, I hope you have some sort of friend (and equal, not a parent, neither a professional) that understands and supports you.

      As hard as it is, try to be mentally independent from your parents (accept this time they won´t be able to help); trust your doctors, and work on yourself.
      Be very honest with professionals, and try to be as active and constructive as possible during therapy.
      Also do your research, learn independently, and take your mental health, your happiness, as the epicentre of your world: our issues are not something to “get by with”, but a problem to resolve and overcome.

      It´s a long way, but the first step is already taken, and well-being is at the end of the path.
      It´s your battle, and when you win it or learn to lead a reasonably good life with your condition, you will be a conqueror, and the glory will all be yours.

      Reply
  57. Rick

    I don’t even know where to start. I did score
    a 26 on this test. It is however difficult to
    ascribe my symptoms to the many facets
    that are specific to my existence.

    I have MS. I suffer from depression. I
    am a mixed race individual. I grew up
    with an alcoholic step-father and somewhat
    narcissistic, though well meaning mother.

    I do have a strained history with social
    interaction, although that varied depending
    on the time period and race/ethnicity of the
    people around me.

    I am above average intelligence (IQ 136),
    and find that my raw intelligence, my background
    of Hatian French/Philadelphia German/Irish likely
    helped me to perceive hope and battle through adversity.

    Any advice on where to seek help (go to neurologist,psychiatrist)
    or provide some reflection on my situation.

    I suppose I should thank you for your time, to avoid feeling to
    self absorbed.:)

    Reply
  58. Corey

    Hi I did your test and I scored 34.
    I already have been told that I have aspergers as I was diagnosed in 2010. I have been in denial ever since because to me its just a label and it kills me to think that I am different to other people. What is worse is that I have 2 brothers and 2 sisters all diagnosed with aspergers! So I am guessing that it runs in families. I always thought that I was just shy in school and I didn’t really have any close friends to relate to. I Just did my own thing most of the time. I’m 22 now and I am going to be starting college in September and I am anxious already even though its only July. I guess its because I feel lonely and most of the lads that I went to school with are going/gone to this college called Waterford IT.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Corey
      Thank you for leaving your comment.

      It is now September and so you are probably starting your course. I truly do wish you all the best with it. I hope that you can develop the skills that you will need to move into your desired career. 🙂

      Take care,
      Justine

      Reply
  59. Paul

    I’m 56, have been a programmer for 35 years, and scored a 42. I have a large family, making up for my lack of friends. I hated high school, but in college I managed to join a fraternity, one of the best moves ever for me. Instant structured friends. Had the time of my life. Still keep in touch sometimes. All my other friends have come thru work relations. I’d say I have a hard time making friends, and do a really bad job of keeping the ones I do make.

    Many times I have thought I needed an instruction manual for life. I stuttered really bad from 1st grade till about 11th, made communication that much worse.

    I am married, no kids, and am relatively successful and happy. The thing about being a programmer is it’s a good place for me, I’m good at it, but I was never considered ‘management’ material. I’m basically doing the same job I did 30 years ago. That makes me wonder if I’m a bit of a failure, or disappointment career wise. Getting a diagnosis of Asperger’s (or whatever it’s called now) would give me an explanation, if not an excuse. It’s a little late in my career for any big changes or advancements, but I can probably work on things.

    I am planning on getting a diagnoses at some point. In a weird way I’m hoping I do have Asperger’s, it would sure explain a lot of things.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Thanks Paul for sharing your comment 🙂

      It is great to hear that you have a supportive marriage relationship. That is a great support and benefit in living in today’s world.

      You also seem to have chosen well with your career in programming. This is also a fantastic support. So well done! 🙂

      All the best,
      Justine

      Reply
  60. Chris

    Hi, I’m Chris and I’m a 46 year old Minnesotan. I scored 43.

    After nearly 20 years of struggling through a romantic relationship my wife who works with developmentally challenged adults she suggested I might have Aspergers. Being unfamiliar with Aspergers I was initially offended and I actually thought to myself “I’m not retarded, why would she suggest such a thing?”.

    So I got curious and started educating myself about it and the more I read, the more I could see the Aspie in me. So I took the ASQ test where I scored 43/50. I understand it isn’t a diagnosis but the mere fact that there might be an explanation for the social “train wreck” my life has been was very interesting to me.

    Whenever I find myself in a social situation, especially with new people, I can only last a very short time (like a couple of minutes) before I start to feel stress and panic and then start looking for a way out. Any excuse would do. Going to the bathroom, going out for a cigarette, anything that could serve as an excuse to exit the social situation long enough for my anxiety to die down. I’ve been this way all my life (I’m 46 now) and when I see people interacting with each other it looks so easy and it even seems enjoyable to them which causes me a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety that I don’t feel the same way. I see them smiling and talking casually with each other and I always wondered how they do it? And moreover why they seem to like it. Sometimes it’s not too bad for me but sometimes I’m literally terrified to enter these situations and all I can do is put on my best poker face and pray it doesn’t last too long. Some people use the “smile and nod” thing to keep from saying offensive things to others, I use it because it’s an effective way to mask the panic attack I’m having on the inside.

    I’ve been told on many occasions that I was mean or offensive to somebody when I honestly meant no offense. This usually happens when I state facts about a situation without taking into account that the facts are hurtful to someone or might show them in a bad light. Once in a while I can pick up the body language and figure out that I’ve behaved poorly and I get very embarrassed and feel terrible for it. The body language isn’t something I am able to pick up on and often times I miss it completely since I’m usually not looking at the person I’m talking to, I’m usually looking at the ground or the trees or a passing car, anything to avoid eye contact. The body language or facial expressions I do pick up on are just by chance and on the rare occasion I see them the only way I can interpret them and comprehend them for what they are is because over the years through repetition and after repeated social failures I have memorized many of them.

    One of the biggest problems I have with people besides the eye contact thing is that they can be so damned unpredictable. It’s very frustrating to me. I can say something to one person without offending them in the least but say the exact same thing to someone else and they might start crying or get angry. Now when I watch more socially successful people interact with each other they don’t seem to have this problem. Somehow they know how to interact with others in a way that almost always ends in a friendly fashion. Many times I’ve watched my wife meet someone new, and by the time they’re done with their first encounter they’re exchanging phone numbers and making plans to do things. It’s utterly amazing to me how it comes so naturally to her. But the flip side of the coin is I feel like I’m a bad person because for me to make that same connection with someone would take years of fumbling through awkward conversations and repeated failures of communication. It makes me have very low self esteem when I fail so miserably at something that seems like such an important component of human existence and it generally leads to me saying to myself it’s just not worth it.

    So at a very early age, to avoid the anxiety that came with every social encounter, I started finding activities that I could do alone. One thing I really loved was computers and electronics, particularly digital electronics. They were nice and predictable for me. I could put something in and expect a predictable outcome. If I didn’t get the outcome I expected I could go back and find a bug that was causing the unpredictability. You just can’t do that with people.

    Haha, I just had a vision of how the rest of you must see me sometimes when I try to interact with you. The 1983 movie War Games. The character’s name was Malvin played by Eddie Deezen. Funny as hell but if I don’t overcompensate constantly that is how an interaction with me might go, without the silly voice though and not quite to that extreme. And like Malvin I feel like I need someone with me at all times to tell me when I’m behaving rudely or insensitively because on my own I will probably not notice until it’s too late. Youtube “war games malvin & jim” to see what I’m talking about.

    Remember your VCR always flashing 12:00? For me that was a perfect excuse to exit an uncomfortable social situation. While the rest of you were chatting it up, I could go to that VCR and in a few minutes figure out how to set the time for you. I wasn’t doing that as a favor to you, I was using it as an excuse to avoid talking to you. How many strangers thanked me for doing that I don’t know but the typical conversation would end like “That’s very impressive, I’ve read that book a dozen times and still couldn’t get it and you just figured it out with no book or anything, thank you!”. Which was a huge success for me because I survived our first social encounter without making you my enemy. Of course in reality, it wasn’t a social encounter at all. When the personal computer became common in most homes it was like a godsend for me. Looking back I can remember many occasions when someone would complain about a computer problem they were having and without hesitating I would volunteer to fix it. It was perfect for me, I could stare at the screen instead of the person. In some circles I even became known as “Computer Chris”.

    Another activity that came naturally to me was music. I loved figuring out how to replicate the music I heard on the radio or a record or even just in my head. I have a pretty good ear for sounds and over the years and without any lessons I’ve gotten quite good at playing guitar. In fact on many occasions I might hear an interesting part of a song or series of notes on the radio and hours later sit down and figure out how to play it like it was recorded in my mind. Originally I played saxophone in school band but despite their repeated efforts I never learned to read music. I could never make the connection between sounds and sheet music. I tried playing in a rock band as well but found playing solo was really what I was interested in. When I’m playing alone I can really dig in and focus but playing with others was way too much for me to pay attention to and I really had trouble queueing off of my bandmates.

    So if you don’t include family and of course my wife, I have one good friend in this world. We’ve been friends since junior high (1984 or so). We might go months on end without talking but when we do connect again it seems like we can pick right up where we left off without missing a beat. It’s really cool and I’m very happy to have him as a friend. You might think that having only one friend is a lonely way to go through life but for me it works just fine. I guess you could say I’m a loner and you might think of that as a bad thing but I’m pretty much ok with it.

    What does bother me though is the stress I endure on a daily basis when I have to “fake normal”. It’s not easy and it’s taking it’s toll. Often times after a normal day of interacting with people I feel exhausted and depressed and after so many years of living in my world I feel like I’m finally running out of gas. I am a very good computer technician and at one point I was head of the MIS department at my work but the department head meetings and the office environment in general was so stressful for me I had to get out of there and find something less socially demanding. So now I work the night shift as a railroad engineer and in a typical night I might have to interact with 8 or 10 people but mostly over the radio which is very easy for me, only 2 or 3 poor souls ever have to deal with me in person and bless them for tolerating me the way they do. Believe it or not, with the exception of the fact that I typically only get 4-6 hours of sleep a day, working nights for the railroad is actually a pretty good fit for me. I’m good at remembering rules and the job often requires my undivided attention on one task at a time, which I excel at, and working nights helps keep me from feeling “crowded” all the time.

    I’m also struggling with other “symptoms” that many Aspie’s talk about. I sometimes feel like I’m wired wrong in the head. I have severe touch issues which my wife often mistakes for intimacy issues and I’m afraid she gets the wrong impression that I don’t like her because I don’t like to be touched. I don’t know why it is but most of the time being touched is very uncomfortable for me. I also don’t like bright light. In fact much of my free time is spent sitting at the computer with one little light on so I can see my keyboard and the rest of the house dark. Probably why the night shift seems to work out ok for me.

    Anyway like the rest of the people here I am very relieved that this thing has a name and that I might not be totally crazy. It’s very interesting to me just how exactly this Aspie thing fits, it’s like someone knows the story of my life.

    Not sure where I’m going to go with it, it’s still very fresh but maybe I’ll try looking for a doctor who knows about it and I’ll probably look up some of the books people here are reading.

    Oops just noticed this is three pages long. Guess I got carried away. Maybe I’ll come back and share more some other time.

    Have a great day!

    Chris

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Chris
      I appreciate you sharing your comment 🙂

      I hear what you are saying about ‘faking it’ and trying to act ‘normal’ in order to fit in with others. It certainly can be draining. At least that has been my experience.

      Thanks again for sharing your thoughts and experiences.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  61. Anastasia

    I’m a fifteen year old girl and have suspected I’ve had Asperger’s for a couple years now… I tend to break done crying in the middle of class for unknown reasons, leading the teacher to send me off to the social worker. One day, after explaining everything about myself that bothered me or made me feel ‘different’, the social worker asked me if I’d ever heard of Asperger’s. I hadn’t. She let me take this test on her computer, and I scored a 36. I have consistently scored a 36 ever since. I do seem to show the symptoms: I have trouble making friends because I am really awkward with conversations; I suddenly become frightened and often start crying, usually without having any idea why. People often assume I have OCD, because I feel like I have to do everything the exact same way every time or I’ll start crying again. I have my summer vacation planned out very carefully, and everyone knows I won’t want to be disrupted. My mom always tells people I have ‘problems’, and I can’t help my strange behavior. She says I act distant and unfeeling, though I disagree with this. I’m sure I must seem that way to her though; I’m scared of her for some reason. That’s why I’m afraid to ask her about Asperger’s. I’m afraid I’ll tell her and it will turn out I don’t have it and I was just imagining things after all.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      Thanks for stopping by and checking out my website. It is always appreciated when readers leave a comment.

      I can relate to the feelings that you expressed about your mom, I have had similar with my own. It is still not easy even today.

      But if you can share your struggles with another trusted family member or friend then that may be helpful to you.

      I wish you all the very best on your journey through life. 🙂

      Take care,
      Justine

      Reply
  62. Battling Society

    I took this test recently with an Autism specialist and scored 48. I’ve hopped on the web (here) to see that it was 48 out of 50. The subsequent testing in the 4 categories gave me a score of over 200 which appears to perhaps be a different testing as that would have been out of a 235-240 (guessed). The result has very much ruled a straight line through situations that have dotted my entire life and I am now able to seek specific help.

    I am able to function fairly well with neurotypicals and am 38, married and have 3 children, all of which have been quite difficult.

    I now am able to actually explain to people how hard I have to overcompensate on a daily basis which of course makes me extremely tired.

    Reply
  63. Phil

    Hi, I’m 59 and I’ve gone my entire life having to deal with this “strangeness” in my make up. It was only a chance comment some months back by the only real friend I have (and who has known me for 25 years) that my life problems might be autism related. Initially I rejected the idea, having the belief that autism was a “made up” affliction to label kids of poor parenting and/or a dreadful education system.

    However I was intrigued, and the more I read on the subject, the more I could see this affliction/disorder/syndrome in myself. I having taken the ASQ test where I scored 34. I know this is not conclusive as a diagnoses, and as things stand I have no immediate intention of going sown the diagnoses route. Rather I am happy just to know that I am not mad or bad, and it brings things into perspective when when I look back at the numerous “train crashes” that seem to be a symptom of my life.

    I am in the fortunate position of being in a well paid and secure job, thus I am able to afford private counseling. I have found a local councilor via the Autism Society’s website who specialises (if that’s the word) in Asperger’s syndrome. Although she cannot diagnose, she is quite certain that I sit somewhere on the Autistic spectrum.

    At her recommendation I am currently reading Tony Atwoods The complete guide to Asperger’s Syndrome. Fascinating read.

    I know that I have got much to work through, the frustration, anger, confusion, anxiety to name a few. But things are starting to make sense. My only goal is to (hopefully) live what is left om my life with some form of peace.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Phil

      Thank you for leaving your thoughts on our blog website. Thanks too for mentioning that book. It is one I have heard of but have not read. I will check it out. 🙂

      My ‘picture’ of autism has also greatly changed over the past 5 years or so. I am glad to now have a better understanding of it.

      I am glad too to hear that you have been able to bring ‘things into perspective’ as you better understand this topic of Autism spectrum disorders. I have found a similar thing happen to me.

      All the very best with finding peace in the coming weeks, months and years. 🙂

      Take care,
      Justine

      Reply
  64. Nell

    Hello, I’m 18, and I scored a 38 and I’m wondering whether I should consult a doctor or not. I’d honestly like to avoid it, since that would mean that I’d have to talk to my mother about it first. I’ve always thought of my ‘social awkwardness’ and the occasional anxiety as just a part of my personality so I’m not sure if the hassle is worth it. Can talking to a doctor actually help? What would it be helping me with?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Nell
      Some people do find that it does help to talk to their doctor, but not everyone decides to do that. It is totally a personal decision that you need to make (perhaps with the help of trusted loved ones, such as parents of other role models in your life).

      As you say, your own ‘social awkwardness’ may or may not have anything to do with an autism spectrum disorder. Only a professional trained in this field can give you such answers after meeting you and talking with you.

      If you are comfortable with who you are and the skills you have to relate to others and to live in modern society then you may decide that you do not need to follow up further.

      If on the other hand you feel concerned about things that you are struggling with then you may decide that it may be worth a trip to your family doctor to discuss your concerns.

      Keep in mind too that the younger you are, if and when, you do obtain a formal diagnosis then it may be easier for you to learn new skills in relating to others and the world around you. Just something to think about.

      I pray that you can come to a decision and the best decision for you.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  65. Bob Porter

    I scored 41. I see a lot of oh-no-I’m-an-aspie comments, but why is that so bad? It’s the study of esoteric material and creating a hobby out of things like programming and logic that has provided me with a rewarding and well-paying career. Growing up was rough, but holding multiple college degrees in the hard sciences came easy for me. Now that I am approaching middle-age, life is better than it has ever been. The best advice I have for someone who has aspie-like behavior is to just own it and use it to your advantage. Life might be hard early on, but with age and practice, one can “fake normal” very well as to not be constantly red-flagged in the society you have to be a part of. Aspie people are solution providers. If you have an engineering problem or need to break a spaghetti mess of a situation into something more manageable, an aspie can do it. You might not read fiction for pleasure but having pi memorized to the tenth decimal place will surely be handier at some point. Or, four times arctangent of one if you want an exact definition of pi, depending on your needs. Or, just approximate it at twenty-two sevenths if you’re feeling loosey goosey. The point is, aspie people are rarely roadblocked if they come across one. They not only have plan B, but plan C and beyond.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Bob
      I appreciate you reading our blog and sharing your comment on our website. 🙂

      I am happy to hear that you are doing well in life and enjoying where you find yourself. That is really encouraging to hear. So thank you for being an encouragement to our readers.

      All the best,
      Justine

      Reply
  66. Olivia

    I need some advice.
    I am 14 years old, and looking into the possibility that I may have Asperger’s. I took the quiz on this site, and scored 32. I do want to look into the possibility of a diagnosis, but where I live (USA) I don’t think it’s possible to receive Asperger’s as a formal diagnosis (I read that it was merged with another condition in the DSM-5).
    Another problem: I’m really uncomfortable with the prospect of bringing this topic to my parents’ attention, because I’m afraid they won’t take me seriously or dismiss my concerns.
    Any advice you have would be appreciated. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Olivia
      Thank you for sharing your comment with us.

      Yes you are correct that Aspergers syndrome is no longer given as a formal diagnosis. The whole system for diagnosing has been changed around.

      That is a really difficult question that you asked about talking to your parents. I totally understand that you are concerned and that it is not easy to approach those that we love and respect with such a topic.

      I would encourage you though to see if you can find a way to open up and share your concerns with your parents. That is usually the best way to go in the long run.

      If you really do not feel you can talk to your parents then is there another trusted adult family member or close friend that you could discuss your concerns with? Perhaps a trusted teacher or counselor at school?

      Think about it carefully as your parents love you. If you are wondering about autism and whether you are on the autism spectrum then it is best to address your thoughts and concerns sooner rather than later.

      I hope to hear back from you on how you went and what you decide to do.

      God bless you in your future. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  67. Lourdes

    I am 38 and believe I have Asperger’s. (I am seeking a formal diagnosis to be sure.) I wanted to thank you for providing this test. It helps pave the way to discussion. I scored a 44.
    I also appreciate the articles, information, and resource links you provide. They are very helpful in one’s journey to awareness and assistance. A hug to you.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Lourdes 🙂
      Thanks for sharing your comment and thanks too for the hug. It is greatly appreciated.

      I wish you all the very best with your diagnosis and future. Let us know how you get on.

      Take care
      Justine

      Reply
  68. Jess

    I am a teenager and I scored a 40. I’ve taken other tests and they all said it was likely that I had an ASD, probably Aspergers. I was just wondering what I should do. Do I go to my family doctor? I’ve heard it’s a long process. What are the benefits if you are diagnosed? Is it worth it?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Jess 🙂
      Thanks for checking out our website, leaving your comment and sharing your quiz score.

      Yes. The process to complete a professional diagnosis can be quite long. Some people decide it is worthwhile them proceeding and following through with a formal diagnosis to find out if they are autistic (on the autism spectrum) or not.

      Others decide that it really is not necessary for them to be diagnosed. They are happy with the skills that they have in life and in handling various situations and relationships etc.

      It really is a personal decision that can be made with family and loved ones.

      What I would say is that often when a child, teenager or young adult is struggling in certain areas then it is definitely wise to consider speaking with the family doctor to see what options are available.

      A diagnosis can open up doors in certain cases where the young person can receive additional support at school, for instance, that can help them learn new skills or ways of better coping with life.

      I encourage you to talk with your parents and trusted family members first. Then see if you can talk with the family doctor and get their feedback too.

      I hope this has helped. Please let us know how you get on and what you decide.

      I truly wish you all the very best.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
      • AmazingJay

        Hi Justine,

        I just took the test more than 3 times and my score was a 37 each time. I also made my spouse take the test and the scores was 16. I am very shocked on my results and it makes a lot of sense to me now. I now will try to look for further treatment.

        Reply
  69. Barry Basinger

    For the benefit of parents of aspies who are “concerned”: I am 72 years old. I was the stereotypical aspie child. The “little professor” who made adults uncomfortable; the one who never quite knew when to come home; the one who was so wrapped up in what he was doing that he didn’t hear his parents, the one who got great grades in school until he got bored with it, and so on. I went into the Air Force and was miserable (I’m sure they were too). I never held a steady job until I became a computer programmer–but I was a very good programmer for 35 years, and retired successfully.

    I was married four times before I met my current Wife of 25 years, who is tolerant of my remaining quirks, understands why I can be weird, and does not expect me to be her Dad. As I grew in the corporate world, I discovered how to “fake normal” better, and so was successful.

    I have been diagnosed as Bi-polar, which was an error. I was certainly depressed, because I didn’t know why I was so different, a “failure”, and why people tended to not like me too well. That is, until I learned I was aspie, and my life changed. Now I know why, I understand it, and I am very, very, happy.

    If your child is aspie, do not try to find medication, do not count on treatment, do not criticize them. Above all, do not act as if you have to shelter and protect them! They are NOT stupid, and they WILL notice that you are acting as if they are somehow “less” than other kids. Instead, be supportive, and lead them toward interests and a career that suits their particular skills–because they do have skills in certain areas that will amaze you. Look at engineering, programming, and so on. Even music. These are all occupations that require “creativity within strict rules”, and play right into the strengths of an aspie.

    Just try to treat them as normally as you can, don’t let yourself get into any sort of “why me Lord” mode, and do not think of them as being mentally challenged. There is a good chance that they have a high IQ, and will actually be perfectly capable of caring for themselves as they mature. As with any other child, your first duty to them is to prepare them for independent living–so do nothing that will prejudice that.

    Teach them, love them, quit taking them to “therapists” who will just make them feel even more “different”, and accept that you will never “cure” them–because there is nothing there that needs “cured”. As a left-handed person must adapt in a right-handed world, similarly, they WILL adapt if you get out of the way.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Barry
      I loved reading through your comment. Thank you so much for your thoughts and insights! 🙂

      I do believe though that it is important for kids and young people (and adults too) to learn skills to help relieve the stress that may come from feeling different and not being sure of how to interpret those around us. So sometimes it is important to go to professionals that can help teach these necessary skills.

      At the same time, it is important that those we turn to do indeed instil a sense of value and purpose in to us and those we love. We are all different, regardless of being on the autism spectrum or not. And we can learn to better get along and to better understand one another.

      Thanks again for sharing, Barry.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Robert Reynolds

      I scored a 36 and have always had relationship problems. My wife has suspected this possibility and I am 23, was a Marine, used to write a lot and am musical. I look back at my childhood which was much rougher than many of those I know and I can’t figure out if all my “fits” were related to past events or to this….

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hi Robert
        Thank you for reading this website and for leaving your comment.

        I encourage you to follow up more either through your family doctor if you want to seek a professional diagnosis.

        Or you can use a website created by an organization in your area that focuses on helping people be more aware of autism and autism spectrum disorders. An example of such a website is: http://www.usautism.org/

        If you contact this website and tell them that you want further information then they should be able to point you in the right direction.

        Relationships are challenging for everyone. But yes being on the the spectrum can for sure make things more challenging!

        I encourage you to follow up and find out more information. Perhaps in your case getting a diagnosis may benefit you as you are still young and may be able to develop some skills to help in areas where you are struggling.

        Again I do thank you for reading this blog. Stop by again and let us know how you get on.

        Take care,
        Justine 🙂

        Reply
  70. Paul

    Hello Justine,
    Been having some difficulty with anxiety and what I had been given to believe was depression. A psychologist has pointed me toward Attention Training and also to Mindfulness. Both are enlightening.

    However, I got on to talking with her about the possibility of Asperger’s being the culprit for some of my anxiety over social situations, feeling crowded by strangers, and difficulty with prioritizing work tasks, concentration on one thing etc. She mentioned talking to my GP about it, but in the meantime, I had taken this test once already on another site and again today on this site.

    And the reason for taking it a second time is that I was highly surprised at my original score of 41 and so I wanted to see if this was not just a blip; I got the exact same score again today! I will talk to my GP about a referral with a view to a diagnosis. But I just wanted to say thanks for having this facility to use as a prompt or a guide toward solving some of my issues.

    Thanks, all the best – Paul.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Paul
      I appreciate you taking the time to leave your comment. Thanks. 🙂

      That is a great idea to talk to your GP. Your doctor is often one of the best starting points to get a diagnosis and to find out more on autism spectrum disorders.

      And I thank you Paul for sharing your appreciation for this website. Honestly my heart is to just be an encouragement and sounding board for readers who are on this journey of life (a journey that often is not easy, but at the same time can be meaningful and fulfilling).

      I hope to hear from you again, Paul. Let us know how you go with your GP. 🙂

      God Bless you
      Justine

      Reply
  71. Lance

    I was fascinated by the character “Hank” on Parenthood who, as an adult, realized he had Asperger’s tendency. He scored a 40 which “Dr. Peliken” claimed was well into the Asperger’s domain. I saw so much of myself in Hank’s character that it made me wonder whether where I fell in that spectrum. I just took your text and scored a 31 which I understand is right on the borderline. I’m over 60 y/o at this point, so I’m sure I’ve “learned” various social skills that I know I lacked as a kid, and I can’t help but believe I would have scored far higher if I took this test in my youth.

    Do you have any suggestions about how the score might be skewed according to age and life experience? How would you interpret a score from a 60 y/o vs. a 12 y/o?

    By the way, I’m not at all embarrassed or upset if I actually DO turn out to be Asperger’s. If anything, it would be a great RELEIF to me since it would finally explain many of the difficulties I’ve encountered in life, especially regarding my social ineptness and my general OCD tendencies.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Lance
      I also enjoy the tv show Parenthood and how they incorporate different aspects of autism and asperger’s syndrome throughout the show.

      I do not really have any suggestions about the score being skewed. But I do believe that as we grow up and older that it is very common to learn skills to ‘fit in’ with those around us. I do think that there definitely may be some skewing of results of tests due to us trying to be like others around us and to be an average, ‘normal’ person.

      Sorry I can not specifically answer your questions. But I would love to hear what other readers think on this subject. Please reply and leave your comments. Thank you. 🙂

      I agree that I am not embarrassed either. For me it gave me some clearer understanding of why I act and respond in the ways that I do (and have over the years).

      Thanks again for your comment Lance.

      God bless you,
      Justine

      Reply
      • Bill

        For me, some confusing parts of the questionnaire are conditions with 2 variables, like “I don’t usually notice small changes in a situation or a person’s appearance.”
        I’m 69 & not outstandingly successful (homeless but mostly self supporting for 20 yrs). I recently met a girl w/ Aspergers who suggested I get tested. This test score was 27, but I kept having to ask myself if my answer was for the benefit of a positive score or to act “normal”. Someone once also suggested I get tested schizophrenia but that made things MUCH worse, and I don’t have too much faith in it. How would knowing I have Aspergers would help me.

        Reply
        • Justine

          Thanks Bill for leaving your comment and question. 🙂

          Some people do find that receiving a formal diagnosis and finding out that they are autistic (on the autism spectrum) can help to clarify and explain why they have always acted, responded or felt certain ways that others around them did not seem to experience.

          Others are happy to just know that they are not alone and they do not pursue a professional diagnosis.

          It is totally a personal decision.

          For children and young people a diagnosis can assist as they can be shown skills that can help them better relate to others throughout life.

          You shared that you are age 69. Hence you have probably learned skills yourself along the journey of life.

          So in answer to your question, there may not be a lot of benefit in obtaining a diagnosis. It has to be something that you decide for yourself.

          If you have questions about the topic and even about whether it would be beneficial to follow up further then check out a website such as this:
          http://www.usautism.org/

          Take Care Bill and feel free to stop by in the future and share your thoughts with us.
          Justine 🙂

          Reply
  72. lisa

    I am 41 years old I have scored 43 I have also completed an autism test and scored high, as I child I chose animals over people was always immaculate with my things got into trouble as I could not cope with people touching my food or things. as I have got older I struggle in relationships that don’t tend to last more than 3 years struggle so much don’t feel a bond, that causes problem as I hate social gatherings and feel so uncomfortable, always feel I am judged.

    I went to university and was diagnosed with dyslexia at 34 years old, was not happy after several tests and a psychological report they advised I seek further assistance as they felt there may be other underlining diagnosis, I never did.

    At home everything has its place I have to have things done in a certain way, I am in a relationship at the moment and my children have all grown up, my partner has younger children and he will always say its always my way. I cant cope with mess or dirt, things have to be in the right place or box, my children would have boxes for all there toys one for cars, dolls lego ect and they would put them away so well. our home was never messy, it is only now I see how fixed I am with this how people comment its not normal. this can cause many arguments as its like a temper tantrum if things are not where they should be.

    I am very obsessive on things, purchases and wont stop till I get it, buying animals or pets. I struggle with affection and that plays a huge part in my relationship. something isn’t right but I don’t know what to do I am older, I am not stupid, I can see I have learnt behaviours, for me to take over everything can mask a lot, its doesn’t always allow people to see how things have to be done in a certain way.

    what or where do I go from here 🙁

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Lisa
      Thanks for your comment and sharing your experiences with us.

      You ask, where to from here?
      … We I guess it depends if you want to follow up with a professional and seek out further diagnosis. If so then I suggest you either go through your family doctor as a starting point.

      Or if you prefer you can use the contact details on a website such as this link: http://www.autism.org.uk/
      and ask them for assistance in your area.

      I truly wish you all the very best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  73. Jamie

    OMG!! The Asperger’s description explains my entire existence! I’m 37 and have always just thought (and have been told repeatedly) that I was shy, hopelessly socially inept, and just a screw-up loser that couldn’t get along with people even though I’m super nice (I scored a 40). This syndrome explains everything though, right down to all the feelings and reasonings I couldn’t get people to understand, my disorganization in my personal life, and my inability to just be a normal grown up. I feel so much better knowing there is a reason for my inability to fit in with everyone else beyond just not being good enough; that there is nothing wrong with me, I am just wired differently. I am hoping to take my newfound realizations to a doctor as soon as I am able to, so I can get an official diagnosis. It would be nice to be able to have a legitimate (and legally protected if needed) request for a little consideration for my differences, and maybe people won’t be so weirded out by me.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Jamie
      Sorry for my delay in replying. I have just returned from a family get-together. 🙂

      I would encourage you to follow through to and seek out advice from you doctor. That is often a preferred way to get started and to begin the process of a diagnosis.

      I know what you are saying. It is like a light turns on and you see for the very first time why you are the way you are. ‘Wired’ differently as you say. Yes it does begin to explain some things… 🙂

      Thank you for sharing your comment. Please feel free to stop by again and let us know how you are getting on.

      Take care, Jamie and God Bless you. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  74. Michael

    Hello, my name is Michael i’m a 29 year old male. I’m not diagnosed with any form of autism but over the last couple of years i have been wondering more and more if i am. I was wondering if there was anyone else who came to realise that they were suffering from a form of autism later in life and if they could help or tell me how they came to realise.

    My whole life i have struggled with social interactions and have always kept to myself. When i was younger i struggled in school and was always in the lower classes suffering with dyslexia. I was ambidextrous up until high school, when i was forced to choose one hand to write with as my handwriting was so bad.

    I have always excelled in the arts, being a musician and loving to draw. Later in life i acheived a first class degree in audio production and now i am studying a masters in sound design at a film school in the uk.

    Lately i have been suffering from social anxiety and really struggling to interact and it has become more obvious as my course relies heavily on socialising with many other departments. I’m having regular panic attacks and find myself being unable communicate in groups.

    I tend to keep to myself most of the time although i really want to interact with others more. I have alway known something was not right as i have struggled to keep relationships in the past and never had a long term relationship. I also struggle to keep in contact with friends and have lost many friends over the years due to this. I only have a handful of close friends that i have kept in contact with over the years.

    I guess i have always known soemthing is wrong but i’ve always ignored it. It’s only lately as it seems to be effecting my career that i feel i need to face whatever the issue is head on. The more i read about autism and the symptoms the more i feel i may be suffering from a form of it.

    If anyone who is or has been in a similar situation later in life can share their experiences or help with what steps i should take next, i would be really greatful.

    Thank You

    Michael

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Michael
      I know that it is not an easy thing to open up and share our struggles. So I sincerely thank you for taking that step.

      [ On a side note: I want to say sorry for my delay in replying to your comment. I have been away with a family event and am just now getting back to my regular schedule 🙂 ]

      I too came to the knowledge that I am on the autism spectrum later in life. For me it was in my late 30’s. It has been somewhat helpful to me to finally understand the reason why I have struggled socially and in relationships over the years.

      Perhaps one of the first places you can begin to find out relevant information is to use a website on the topic of autism in your local region.

      Here is one example to get you started: http://www.autism.org.uk/
      From sites like this you can make contact and ask for assistance in your local area. Hopefully they can point you in the right direction.

      As you requested, I too would love to hear from others who have had similar experiences to Michael. Please leave your comments, thoughts and experiences below by clicking ‘Reply’.

      Thank you again Michael for stepping out. I truly wish you all the very best and hope to hear from you again.

      God Bless You,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  75. Mackenzie

    I am 10 and a half yrs old. My mother made me do this test because she wanted to see if I have learning issues that are getting worse (I already have developmental delays already). I was wondering if 10 or 11 is too young for a diagnosis of an ASD. I never heard of autism and my mom wants some answers.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      No. The age of 10 should not be too young at all for a professional diagnosis on an autism spectrum disorder.

      Ask you mom to do some research on the Internet. Here is a useful website http://www.usautism.org/

      I hope this helps and I wish you and your family all the very best. 🙂

      Blessings,
      Justine

      Reply
    • David

      Oh crud … I just took this test and scored a 37. I am 54 years of age and if I am autistic, my life suddenly makes a great deal more sense than it did an hour ago.

      I am a Culinary Arts instructor. My entire wardrobe consists of nothing more than work clothes … black trousers, white culinary jackets, cook shirts, black socks, and black restaurant shoes. I like the routine of teaching classes and having instructional standards that allow me to outline what I’m going to teach over the course of a school year.

      I have problems identifying individual students. I realize that there are differences based upon height, gender, weight, and ethnicity … but quite frankly if you were to take 6 white guys of similar build and if you were to then ask me to identify the one named George, I would have problems. Unless I had some degree of highly positive (or negative) interaction with a specific student over several days, all white guys (or gals) look the same to me as do African Americans, Asians, and Hispanic people.

      I have people I am friendly with but no friends. I am not married and have long since given up on dating because I don’t understand body language and cannot read between the lines. I have problems with identifying sarcasm and tend to take sarcastic comments literally.

      When I am home, I like quiet and dim lighting. I know I am supposed to feel bad that I don’t enjoy hanging out with other people, but the concept of socializing because that’s what people are supposed to do eludes me. I simply don’t see the point in socializing and do not regard socializing as being a cost effective use of my time.

      For some reason I am obsessed with the number 3. When I go grocery shopping, most of the things I buy are in groups of 3. I am incapable of buying 4 cans of beans because 3 or 6 seem more appropriate.

      I am an avid news junkie because I take comfort in trying to make sense of this world. I also take comfort in routines and over the years have evolved coping mechanisms for almost everything including how to find a new job, how to move, and how to settle into a new home. At one point, this practice allowed me to pursue an overseas career as an elementary teacher and I was able to move places where I didn’t know anyone without any major problems.

      Why I am the way I am makes more sense now … though I will seek out a psychologist to confirm this diagnosis. Beyond that, nothing has really changed. I am still me and the world is still a confusing place.

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hi David 🙂
        I enjoyed reading your comment. Thanks for sharing it.

        Relationships can be difficult as you said when we struggle with reading body language and understanding what the other person means. I really get that!

        I also prefer to be at home in safe and peaceful surroundings. At home there is not the pressure that so often comes in social settings out in the world. And yes the world can be a very confusing place.

        Thank you again for sharing your thoughts. Feel free to share again any time.

        Take care and God bless you,
        Justine 🙂

        Reply
  76. Shyley

    Hi, I just watched a documentary on ASD and felt like I was listening to my life! I jumped online and took a couple quiz’s with results suggesting I have ASD.

    I score 32 on the above quiz and my neurodiverse score is 150/200 and neurotypical score is 77/200.

    What would you suggest are the next steps towards getting a diagnosis? I know it won’t change anything, but feel I need answers. I hate the unknown. I am 30.

    Thanks.

    Shyley.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Shyley
      I appreciate you sharing your comment and scores.

      You can gather some good information from this website http://www.asperger.asn.au/ This is a registered charity in Australia and offer a range of services.

      My suggestion would be that you contact them, tell them where you live and ask for names of professionals in your area that are familiar with autism spectrum disorders / conditions (ASD / ASC). They should be able to point you in the right direction.

      You can go to your family doctor, but unless they are familiar with the autism spectrum then this may not be the best place to start. However, your family doctor is always another starting point.

      Once you find somewhere with trained people who know about Asperger’s syndrome and autism then you will be able to ask to begin the process of diagnosis.

      I hear what you are saying. Getting a diagnosis does not change the condition, but rather it truly can give some answers, clarity and validation.

      I wish you all the very best in your search. Please come back and let us know how you get on.

      God bless you richly,

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  77. Lindsey

    Hello
    I have a 6 year old son who was just diagnosed with high funtioning autism. The doctor said that if it had been three years ago she would have diagnosed aspergers but said something about not using that term anymore? Anyway, I have been doing some reading about it and I noticed that I can relate to quite a bit of it. I have always felt “different” from everyone else, but i also have very low self-esteem so I just settled for being a loner. I have very bad anxiety. I feel like everyone is always watching me, from the way i walk, how i hold my shoulders when i stand still, where my eyes look and lips move when im talking, how my eyebrows move and how often. When i have a conversation with someone I am thinking to myself the whole time about when to look where and when to move my hand, just everything. It’s stressful and difficult for me unless I know the person very well. So i guess my question is, could my anxiety and certain quirky things that i do be just that? What makes it aspergers? I took the test and scored a 32. And I also don’t know how to get started with a formal test if I do need one. My son was already in counseling and he got his through his counselor. Any advice would be appreciated! I’m just nervous and confused about it.
    Thanks

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi friend 🙂
      I do thank you for sharing your heart, questions and struggles.

      Yes it is true that Asperger’s syndrome is no longer a diagnosis that is given. That name is not used now, rather people are described as being on the autism spectrum or having an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or condition (ASC).

      However there are many people who had previously been diagnosed as having Aspergers and so it is still a term that is used and understood by many in the Aspie community. I guess this will change over time as the term is used less and less by the professionals.

      Many times in families more than one person may be autistic – on the autism spectrum. So since your son has been diagnosed it may also be that you are on the spectrum. But the only way to know for sure is to get a diagnosis.

      Anxiety and personal quirks can impact anyone, both those with Aspergers (those on the autism spectrum) and Neurotypical people. So it is difficult to answer that question.

      Here is a good website to get you started: http://www.usautism.org/
      If you can make contact through the contact details of this site then they should be able to point you in the right direction for someone in your area who can give you a diagnosis.

      I truly wish you all the very best and hope to hear how you go.

      Many blessings over you and your precious family.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Andrew

      Ah yes….the light globe has just lit up!! Similar stories to the above contributors – always felt like a weirdo compared to everyone else, eye contact takes so much effort to do…..looking everywhere BUT at the person talking seems fine to me…., relationships I just can’t handle (divorced once – learnt my lesson! nothing lasting more than a couple of months after that), clothes all similar from one day to another, everything needs to be done”just so..”, previously diagnosed with 8 mental health issues which virtually morph into one spectrum….., voted “Least likely to succeed” by my high school graduating class (I had already dropped out…), over think everything…but maybe I’m just trying to work things out my way…so conscious of how I walk I have based it on Maxwell Smart’s walk.
      So much effort has to go into every situation, it gets tiring.
      But I feel relieved.
      I can deal with it if it has a name.

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hi Andrew
        Thanks for reading my blog posts and leaving your comment. 🙂 I appreciate you taking that time.

        I also found that having a name for why I am like I am has helped me to better understand myself and also to better accept myself.

        Yes. I understand and also agree that social situations (even with my family of origin/birth) is totally draining and tiring. It is like I feel that I always need to ‘pretend’ to be someone else (the person that others want me to be) rather than just being me…. That can be very draining!

        Anyway, thanks Andrew for stopping by. I hope you find other parts of our website helpful.

        Take care,
        Justine 🙂

        Reply
  78. donna

    Hello,
    i have sat my 12 yr old daughter to do this test because i suspect she may have aspergers. she scored 38 on this test. she has very poor social skill and finds it draining and hard to make friends. she struggles to concentrate in class due to the other students being to noisy. in all fairness there really isnt much noise in class.
    this ends up taking it toll on her, leaving her extremely frustrated and emotional and often has to leave the class for her to calm down and collect herself. she also doesn’t understand why she has to sometimes do activities that other children would like to do and not just what she wants. and when others don’t feel like doing what she wishes to do she feels its because they are no longer her friend. this obviously has impacted and restrains of her friendships. despite her struggles socially in school she is doing very well grade wise, even thou she has quite a bit of time off due to having EDS and flare ups of joint pains. i have spoken frequently about her struggles to her previous school and doctor whom showed very little sympathy to my childs upset. she comes home most day sobbing her heart out because others have distracted her in class and she couldn’t complete her work. i know this sounds trivial but the simplest things can cause huge upset to her in class. like yesterday another childs paper covered the corner of hers. this to my daughter was unacceptable and an invasion of her space. she ended up so frustrated because she cant express herself to others, she burst in to tears and was sent out of class to collect herself.
    i feel i have let her down, as well as the previous school and doctors who have told me she is to young to be assessed. is there anywhere i can go to get her the help for her to remain in school, because i am one more brake down away from pulling her out? thank you in advance for any help.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      Thank you so much for stepping out and sharing your daughter’s experiences. I know that is not easy!

      Check out this website link:
      http://www.autism.org.uk/About-autism/All-about-diagnosis/Diagnosis-the-process-for-children.aspx

      On the page thru this link you will see a phone number where they can point you towards local sources of help and support. Since you have not found any help or support from the previous school or your doctor then this phone number would be my recommendation.

      My heart goes out to you and your daughter. From my own experience, I think that often people (even school leaders and doctors) do not understand unless they have personally experienced something similar.

      You certainly have not let your daughter down. It is clear that you want to help her with all your heart.

      What I can say is that 12 years old should not be too young in any way to get a diagnosis. In fact, it is most beneficial to any child to be diagnosed and to then receive support and assistance at as young an age as possible.

      Hence I encourage you to keep seeking answers. There is support out there from those who do understand what your daughter is going through. So keep looking and you will find it!

      Please know that you are always welcome to come back and leave your comments on our website. We would love to hear how you get on. You, your daughter and your family remain in my prayers.

      May God bless and guide you.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  79. Julie

    I have been with my partner for 8 yrs and only recently felt that certain of his traits could be down to asbergers. I did the test answering what I feel he would say and scored 37. Don’t know if or whether I should broach the subject with him. Do you have any suggestions? Don’t want to upset him but can’t help but wonder if he already knows. He is a 55 yr old man and I do know that a few years ago he attended a day course on CBH.
    Any advice?
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      Thank you for sharing your comment and thoughts. 🙂

      This is a hard one. Keep in mind that the AQ Quiz that you completed only gives an indication of the possibility of being on the autism spectrum.

      But realistically your partner needs to complete the quiz himself as your answers may not be 100% the same as what he would enter.

      I guess it comes down to a couple of things:
      1. What do you think could be gained from seeing if your partner may have asperger’s syndrome? If you feel strongly that there are benefits to going down this path then it leads to the next question.

      2. How well are you and your partner able to talk and communicate with each other? If you can invest time in really knowing each other and opening up to each other then you may be able to bring the topic of aspergers up.

      In the end only professionals can give a formal diagnosis. Often mature aged people do not see a benefit of obtaining such a diagnosis. However others find that it actually answers a lot of questions for them, question that they have wondered about all their life.

      I encourage you to think about this carefully and I also pray for wisdom for you as you move forward.

      All the best and let us know how you get on.

      Blessings,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  80. Sofía

    I think I might have Aspergers but I’m still young and scared to tell my parents about the possibility. I’m worried that they might not take me seriously.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi friend
      Thanks for commenting.

      Since this is really concerning you it is important for you to bring it up with either your parents or some other trusted family members that you feel safe and comfortable with.

      If you are on the autism spectrum then it is best to find out at as young an age as possible so that you can get support and also learn the skills that you will need to help you live in this world.

      I truly do wish you all the very best and hope to hear down the track how you get on.

      Many Blessings,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  81. Schizoid

    I scored 34 here and 128 (aspie) / 69 (non-autistic) in the rdos.net

    In my first visit to a psychologist (I was 11) he suggested the possibility that I have AS, but I gave up after a few sections because I felt very uncomfortable. 8 years later I was diagnosed with dysthymia and schizoid PD by a psychiatrist.
    Now two years after receiving a diagnosis of dysthymia / SPD I went forwarded to a new evaluation on suspicion of ASD.
    It’s possible have AS and SPD? :/

    sorry for my bad English ‘-‘

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      If at all possible it may be beneficial to you to obtain a formal diagnosis. That way you will have a better idea if you are on the autism spectrum.

      From my own personal family experience I know that it is not always easy or simple for the professionals to give an exact diagnosis. In our case, over the period of some months, different diagnoses were given as the psychologist spent more time with their patient.

      Your question has a controversial answer. Sometimes a person who is diagnosed with aspergers can later on be diagnosed with schizoid personality disorder instead.

      A person may indeed have both conditions or may just have one of them, but is difficult for the professionals to diagnose accurately which condition it is.

      But to give a simple answer to your question, yes, a person may have schizoid personality disorder and also have asperger’s syndrome.

      I hope this helps.

      Take care and stop by again.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  82. charl

    Hi, I am 49. It recently was brought to my attention that I may be on the autism spectrum. I have done the aq test several times now and always score between 47 and 48. I have answered very honestly (in my opinion), but am a little surprised I score so high. I function pretty well – I have a full time job working with animals which I love. I have always had oddities – needing to sit at my own table at lunch at work, not liking people to touch me, not liking eye contact, needing to doodle in meetings, biting my nails, chewing gum, rubbing my feet together and rubbing my arms. I am also very honest, and have had people tell me that I need to learn how to lie, I struggle to work out peoples intentions and suffer from anxiety, panic disorder and according to my doctor – depression (although I think I am pretty happy). Anyway, not sure what I am trying to say – lol. Maybe just that it was a bit of a revelation discovering at age 49 why I am like this.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      It certainly can be a revelation. Like a light turning on when you discover a possible reason why you have struggled in certain areas all your life! 🙂 I totally hear where you are coming from.

      Thank you for sharing. Feel free to comment again in the future.

      All the very best,
      Justine

      Reply
  83. Sky

    I scored 36. Have only recently looked at getting a disgnosis; after a whole life struggling with being different and underachieving because I found school so stressful, and later work the same, I have taken a massive step today to speak to someone at the National Autistic Society who was wonderful and is sending me information of where to go to get an assessment. I found this test and am not surprised at the result. I’ve suffered anxiety all my life, have been given various medication which has not helped, and counselling which has also not helped. My brother is clearly on the Asperger spectrum, and talkng with him (he has no diagnosis and is not bothered about getting one) we believe our father was also on the spectrum. I’m told that females present differently and are often not recognised because of our different coping mechanisms which effectively mask our problems from others. I will be so relieved if I receive a diagnosis and it will explain, after 55 years on this planet, why I find life so exhausting and such a struggle due to my hypersensitivity and what others see as quirky behaviour.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Friend 🙂
      Thanks for commenting about your own situation.

      Yes. I have found it also refreshing to now understand why my life was challenging. Why I found it difficult and also exhausting (as you shared) interacting with others.

      Trying to be ‘normal’ as the average person expects certainly can drain energy and even motivation!

      I wish you all the best and look forward to any future comments.

      God Bless you,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  84. jose fogel

    Hi, I scored 32… the reason I took the test is because my son was diagnosed last month; I read that it’s probably inherited from the father. I have struggled with depression and anxiety, plus a few nervous tics since I can remember (9 or 10 years old). Zoloft took care of the depression but can’t seem to fight the anxiety, a therapist suggested ADD, but meds not working. My feeling is always being in a different “frequency” than everyone else… I told a therapist that although I am not suicidal, I would be totally fine if I died tomorrow. It would mean the end of years of suffering, not finding life enjoyable. The truth is that I can’t afford intensive therapy for both my son and myself at the same time, if I have to choose I choose my son! Thanks for your test and the information made available to us…

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      I appreciate you commenting and sharing your score and personal experiences.

      It is true that anxiety certainly can be difficult to deal with. I encourage you to continue to find ways to relax and to deal with stress. As you know life does have ways of throwing stresses up at us and it can feel overwhelming sometimes.

      So please as you continue to support your son throughout his journey remember to also find ways to help yourself on yours.

      All the very best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Brante

      Wow! I’m a 36 year old male and have struggled my whole life. I had no friends in school from pre-k all the way through high school. I’m good at academic test taking. Even in everyday life at work, I think people think I’m the “weird guy” because they all socialize in a group and I’m in my office alone.

      I feel like you about not necessarily feeling suicidal but not knowing how to better my situation in my career and it is a severe struggle because I want to switch careers because I got caught up in a sales position out of desperation and now 10 years later I’m still in it because my fear of the unknown is debilitating. I can put on a show for about 2 hours or so but when I run out of presentation talk and it comes to small talk, I just get anxious and desperate for some kind of intervention that leads me away from the situation and conversation.

      I never knew until recently what Asperger’s was until I read an article about Putin possibly having it. When I read about it I was blown away. It explained my whole life.

      I scored a 42 by the way.

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hi
        I appreciate your comment.

        From my own life, and also listening to others, I believe that unless someone has had a similar experience then they do not understand how draining and difficult it can be relating to others in social situations. This includes interacting in work scenarios too.

        Finding out about Aspergers syndrome and other Autism Spectrum Disorders can certainly help connect the dots! It has for me and for others that I speak with.

        Again thanks for sharing. I hope to hear from you again. So please stop by if you want to share more on your own journey.

        Blessings,
        Justine 🙂

        Reply
  85. Jai

    My score was 42. I’ve taken several of these type of tests by the suggestion of others. I’m afraid to get an actual diagnosis. My youngest son also shows strong signs of Asperger’s but again, I’m afraid to get a diagnosis for fear that we would have to change our parenting style. Our style works right now and I’ve incorporated many things I’ve learned about Asperger’s but I don’t want others using the diagnosis as an excuse for him. I’m already homeschooling all 4 of my children. My son and I clash terribly when it comes to doing things now instead of waiting. He does not do well with the “leave it for now and we’ll come back to it”. He will never go back to it. My sister (the one I’m most afraid of “disappointing”) told me I should take the test because it sounds like me but then she turned around and got upset that “not everything is a disorder”. I don’t know if an actual diagnosis would be helpful. I don’t know what to do.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Friend
      Thanks for sharing.

      That is a hard one to answer. Should you go through the process of getting a formal diagnosis? No one really can answer that but yourself.

      I can say that many people who are struggling and suspect that they may be on the Autism Spectrum do go on to seek professional advice and get a diagnosis.

      But then there are also lots of others who decide that they do not feel a formal diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder would be helpful at this stage in their life.

      Often though for children who are struggling it can be helpful and can better prepare them for a fulfilling life if they can receive all the assistance that is available to them at as young an age as possible.

      I do pray that you receive clear direction and wisdom what to do. Both for yourself and also for your son.

      Please by all means come back again and let us know how you get on and what you decide to do. 🙂

      God’s richest blessings,
      Justine

      Reply
        • Justine

          I am not sure why that is. Are you able to do the test again and see if it works for you?

          Perhaps restart your computer (or tablet or mobile) first and then retake the quiz.

          Let me know what happens. 🙂

          Thanks
          Justine

          Reply
  86. Naomi

    Hi, my name is Naomi and im 38 years old. I scored 40. I have always felt different – slightly abstract! Im extremely artist and very emotional. I have impulsive tendencies with interests and can become self-exhumed by them. I am always watching space documentaries and adore Stephen Hawking and EINSTEIN. I am extremely analytical. I was diagnosed with dyslexia and dyscalica in my last year at university (aged 37).
    I have two sons and my eldest has aspegers.
    I have fought to support my son, which has enabled me to go onto study Autism (L4 Diploma). I also have a facebook page supporting families and their children called Aspergers Burgers (on Facebook).

    The more I have learnt, the more i am convinced I am the same as my son.

    I am proud that the likelihood of my having it, means i am quirky and interesting. It also explains alot about my desire to be my own boss and my passion for perfection. I struggle with myself socially but hide it very well. I have become sensitive to people’s auras and am able to empathise.

    Naomi xxxx

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Naomi
      I am so happy that you stopped by and shared your own experiences with us.

      It is wonderful that you are able to support your son and also other families that are going thru similar experiences to you. Good on you for setting up the facebook page and having a heart to help others. 🙂

      I hope to see you here again.

      Take care and all the very best for the future for you and your precious family.
      Justine

      Reply
  87. Lindsey

    I am Lindsey and I just scored a 40. I am 14 years old and I have not been diagnosed with Autism/Aspergers Syndrome. How do I bring something like this up with my parents? I have been diagnosed with Sensory Processing disorder.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Lindsey
      Thanks for commenting and sharing your score.

      SPD (Sensory Processing disorder) is an interesting topic. Since your parents are now aware of SPD due to your diagnosis it would be great if you could just sit down and talk with both of them and bring up your concern over the autism spectrum.

      Please Lindsey keep in mind that the aspergers quiz that you took on this website is not in any way a diagnosis. This is something that only a professional can give.

      So my advise is to ask your parents to sit down with you and bring up your concerns. I have found that when it is possible (and safe to do) honesty and being open is always best.

      I wish you and your family all the vest best and hope to hear from you again.

      Blessings,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  88. Charm

    I also got a conformation by my Sons counsellor and Psychiatrist today…After relating through all the family history and chatting about my Sons case, The Psychiatrist asked me ” How was High school for you having Asperger’s?” I was a little shocked, and I felt very Visible. But later thought about it. That’s why I’m here… I’ve been researching all evening On Asperger’s, women, and tests….. And why is it more pervasive at 42 than before…. I am way less social now although I don’t care either…. I find social interaction tiring and tedious. I did try…. went to groups for the kids.. gave up and have now embraced my home (albeit prison). I study my Networking IT course, then It will be Psychology and Counselling to work from home….. As I have high empathy and Insight in Marriage.. ( Have counselled a few marriages that are still going..as they were willing to hear each other..) I am a Carer for a wildlife org and have a natural affinity with creatures, except strange dogs…. I hate dogs barking.
    Do others waver continually between analytical and rightbrain??? I feel too much.. and shut down. But still embrace being me. 🙂 peace

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Charm 🙂
      Thanks for your comment, sharing and questions.

      I also find interacting socially with others to be quite tiring and sometimes even exhausting! It is hard isn’t it to find the right balance.

      I would love to hear what others think about your question on wavering between being analytical and right-brained. So please feel free to leave us your thoughts and experiences.

      Peace be to you also Charm. Feel free to stop by again here any time. 🙂

      Many Blessings,
      Justine

      Reply
  89. uma

    I am Uma and I am 13. I scored a 34, so i definitely have AS. I was diagnosed 1 and a half years ago, but doctors in Puerto Rico are bad, so i took this test to make sure my doctor wasnt wrong, and he was right. Now, i live in florida, and doctors are more specific, and your test helped. Thank you 🙂

    Reply
  90. Nellie Moore

    Update, I just took the http://www.rdos.net/ test and tested at 144 out of 200 in the neurodiverse (Auspie) and 79 out of 200 in the neurotypical (non-autistic).

    More confirmation for me. I also came across some questions that I have never seen before, but when I saw them I sure recognized myself and wonder what they mean and where they fall in the spectrum.

    “Do you get a pleasurable tingling sensation in the head, scalp or back of the body in response to certain sounds?”

    “Do you feel an urge to peel flakes off yourself and / or others?”

    Both of those are things that I do and or experience and have for many years. I don’t peel flakes off of others but have done often with myself, especially as I have gotten older. I was amazed to find this and the other question about sensation on a quiz. Likewise the one about being out in public, at social gatherings and then coming home tired or exhausted. Wow, that’s a thing???

    Does anyone else say yes to these two questions? Any sense of what they mean on the scale?

    What is the difference between Autism and Aspergers and Aspie? Is Aspie the nickname?

    Now I am looking for a community. I’m finding myself.

    Thank you, thank you!!!

    Reply
    • Katara Hayes

      I just took the same test and the results were astonishing. 187 of 200 for neurodiverse and 28 of 200 in the neurotypical. There were questions I had never seen before in it. I didn’t know the exhaustion after being in a social situation was a thing either. It does explain why I retreat to my room to take a nap or lie down after every interaction with people. They talk too much. I don’t know the difference between Autism, Aspergers and Aspie. I’m still finding my way through the information and gathering good websites for this.

      Reply
  91. Lucy

    Have been toying with the symptoms of Aspergers for a year or so now. I am 29 and from being a kid who was the bane of my mothers life for my ‘finicky’ eating, hyper sensitivity to touch and material (socks with elastics in them? Tantrum before school), and smells. All went down well when I was dragged along to rock concerts with her (I used to sit in the corner with fingers in my ears). At around age 10 a few family problems lead me into the ‘meltdown’ territory, I screamed for hours on end and talked about ‘ending it all’. Looking back I thought, wow how does a 10 year old get diagnosed with depression? Really it was just absolute overwhelming meltdowns at the changes going on at home, and that inner anger/frustration that is palpable and at the time you cannot find a way out of.

    From the age of 10 to 16 I was put in the child mental health service for ‘school phobia’ because I didn’t want to go to school. At no point did anyone ask me why, they just prescribed drugs and worked on a ‘ladder’ to get me back step by step. I managed, just, until another couple of years later I started self harming to cope with my teenage years and back I went! I dropped out of school in order to visit the quiet woodlands (far from the typical teenager of smoking around the bike shed). I coped in social situations as I was antisocial or at least ‘a bitch’ which in hindsight, as a woman I feel we get labelled as such compared to men who deal with the direct conversational side of this better; or at least are viewed as just difficult. I don’t even need to mention the hyper focus or obsession with things. I could talk about so many subjects, much to the tedium of anyone who is listening!

    I now have my own business and cope well, along with the meltdowns over changes to routine (usually the tiny things rather than the larger, like getting off a bus two stops before I should! I was annoyed at myself for how much that bothered and upset me!). Social situations have gotten worse the older I’ve gotten. I just cannot read people, I describe it as being a bit like bambi all wide eyed and naive and not being able to understand why people aren’t what they appear.

    I don’t know if it’s worth looking into a diagnosis, I’ve had a lot of other health issues and worry that I might come across like I’ve just brought something else to the table. But I am struggling, especially now I no longer have a partner who would really act as a blanket to help me through the emotional struggles. I scored 36, but again, it’s all those things in hindsight that added up to a bigger picture. This has helped.

    Really enjoyed reading through all the replies, and reassuring to find people who have used these traits as a positive, especially in the fields that require great research, for that we seem unparalleled. We just need that extra person to prize us away every now and then 😉

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Lucy
      I truly appreciate you stopping by and opening up about your own struggles. 🙂 Thank you too for saying that this website has been helpful to you. I am glad that the information and comments have been a help.

      Getting a formal diagnosis is a very personal decision. Many people do find it helpful to have that formal diagnosis, while others are happy just to know that they are not alone and that others are struggling in similar areas.

      I do encourage you to do some further research and see what you feel your heart is telling you to do. Perhaps if you were to find a support group in your local area for those with Autism Spectrum Disorders this may be helpful too.

      Please feel free to return at any time and share how you are getting on. You are certainly not alone in life or in your struggles!

      Take care and God Bless you, Lucy 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  92. Bow

    Hi,

    Thank you for the test. It has confirmed what I have always felt about me. My nephew (now 17) was professionally diagnosed with aspergers when he was 12…watching him growing up actually brought great insight to me and my family about my frighteningly similar ‘ways’…my parents would watch him and then stop and stare at me with realisation as they finally ‘saw’ what I had always been going through…

    I scored 37 on this and almost every other test out there…I have always felt ‘outside’ the world and I am going to get myself fully diagnosed now and find strategies to deal…I need to get well because I am exhausted…to my core…

    Thank you so much.

    Bow

    Reply
    • Justine

      Thanks Bow for sharing with us.

      That sure must have been a grand realization for your family seeing similar traits in you and your nephew and realizing why! 🙂

      I wish you all the very best with your diagnosis and treatment.

      Take care and visit us again 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
    • Ryu

      I scored 38 in here and is nothing wrong with me.. I’m just shy, introverted, solitary and highly intelligent.. are you sure you’re not introverted? introverts are not sociable.. so.. we often feel that we don’t belong into an extroverted society/culture.. http://www.mypersonality.info/personality-types/extraverted-introverted/
      move to Japan and you’ll feel like home because Japan is having an introverted culture/society..
      any shy/intelligent introvert/nerd would get a high score in this test.. this test is only showing how sociable you are.. but I’m not saying that only the intelligent people would get a high score in here..

      Reply
  93. Dianne Schuch Lindsey

    well this is great,

    i am 61 and i scored a 32 the first time and a 34 the second, so now what?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Dianne 🙂
      You really do not have to do anything specific unless you want to pursue a formal diagnosis. In that case, you may begin by asking your family doctor to refer you to a professional that is familiar with autism spectrum disorders.

      All the best with whatever you decide.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  94. Mark

    Dear Justine,

    Thanks for your website. I am 60 years-old and have just discovered that AS runs in my family, although there has never been a formal diagnosis of any family member. After reading some books and information on AS I believe that I have this, and my older brother has it to even a greater degree. I can remember traits in my father and his brother as well. I have now read about 20 books and countless websites on Aspergers and have taken a few online tests. I scored 42 on yours and 150/200 on the RDOS test. But I am confused by some things I have read and I am interested in finding out more. My view is that what they call AS is actually a collection of neurological differences but that have some core features in common. My parents were of a generation that were unaware of ASD. My mother knew I was sensitive and was thus overprotective, so she sensed something was different. My academic performance was spotted – I did very well if motivated, but I had a lot of anxiety in competitive learning situations. I failed math in high school, but then made As in college calculus and published in physics without having an undergraduate degree in physics. My brain seems to work like a browser as someone said and I like to build links between disparate subjects – e.g., art, biophysics and material science… Someone recently thought I was joking when I mentioned that I think concrete is fascinating (I have several books on concrete). I have always had a very broad range of interests but keep returning to a few – geometrical structures, material and art and the relationship to philosophical principles. Initially I was confused because come descriptions said that AS people have one interest of unusual intensity. I have lived most of my life with an intense attraction to imagination and visual imagery, and I am an accomplished digital artist. This also confused me because some of the AS descriptions said that AS people “lack imagination”.

    And I am sometimes also confused because I think of some kids I grew up with who were much more visibly emotionally challenged and I think I could not have AS because I was not like that (stereotypical images). But I definitely felt like they looked. I could make friends, but usually one at a time and I was very clinging, dependent or protective. I was easily bullied, teased and many other kids regarded me as weak and stupid. I had horrible times in groups or at parties (until I discovered alcohol). As an adult after the age of 30 I spent an enormous amount of time developing social skills and learning the rules to “succeed” in the corporate world, although I managed to survive only because I chose very fringe technical jobs and working environments where many of the people were socially challenged. But it was exhausting and although I have adequate social skills, now I simply want to live and work based on my strengths rather than try to adapt.

    I live in Thailand (which is good in many ways for an AS person), and there are not any qualified ASD psychologists here – and I have looked very hard. I am wondering if there is someone in the States or Europe whom I could contact to ask more questions and to resolve some confusion. I will appreciate your comments.

    Best

    Mark

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Mark
      Thank you for leaving your comprehensive comment. I am sure it will be of benefit to other readers.

      I honestly am not able to answer your question regarding someone from the States or Europe etc that may be able to further assist you with clarifying some confusion at your end. But I would love to hear from other visitors who may know of someone who can assist you. If you have any ideas then please leave your comment below this comment. Thank you 🙂

      Thank you again for your support of this site and its readers. I wish you all the best with finding a professional to discuss your concerns with.

      Blessings,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  95. curious aspie

    I will be 50 next year. For the past 2 years I’ve suspected I might have Asperger’s Syndrome. I began taking tests online out of curiosity and always score high in the direction of having it. My doctor has that I need to see a professional. At this time I don’t have the finances to do so. But the more I read about it, take tests online I am beginning to come to the realization that something is going on. I scored 41. I do tend to have a harder and frustrating time socializing with others. It seems to be getting in the way of my social life. I fear that if It’s not treated or looked out that other problems might develop. Also do many people get diagnosed later on in their lives, like after 50?

    Reply
  96. Nicola

    I just took the test because I was intrigued and ended up scoring 37. I’m only 22 and this makes me worry about how this could affect my future. Have you any suggestions about what I should do, for instance, medical help?

    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Nicola 🙂

      I would encourage you not to stress or worry about your score. This is only an indication and not a diagnosis in any way.

      If you are concerned and are having mojor problems relating to others then you may want to seek a professional diagnosis. It is totally a personal decision. Some people decide to get a formal diagnois, while others are happy to learn social skills that may assist without the need for seeking professional assistance.

      I do encourage you to follow your heart and what you are feeling is right for you 🙂

      Let us know how you get on and what you decide to do.

      God Bless you, Nicola
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  97. Sarah

    I am a graduate student in psychology and have always been a little “weird,” have often debilitating social anxiety, and made literally not one friend in undergraduate school (I have a few friends I’ve known for years, and come to think of it, all of them have initiated friendship). I didn’t know much about AS until I did an assignment for my last class and suddenly became enamored–I feel like it explains so many of the problems I have faced in life and continue to face today. At work, I can barely function anymore; I am front desk at a dental office, and sit right in the center where everyone can see me. I am so anxious all day my stomach hurts, and I freeze, unable to do anything, whenever someone comes up behind me, and it takes everything I have not to cover my ears and say “SHUT UP” when too many people are in the room talking. It is impossible to concentrate on anything. I feel like everyone around me thinks I am an idiot because, by default, menial and simple tasks go directly to me–scanning documents, rescheduling an appointment, etc.–and it makes me furious. I have taken this test several times and keep scoring in the 33-36 range, so I think I will try to find a specialist in my area. It would be a huge relief to be able to join a support group and meet people I won’t feel as terrified of being myself around.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Sarah
      Thanks for opening up and sharing some of your own personal struggles. 🙂

      I hear what you are saying. I find sounds, that others do not even seem to hear, to be so loud that many times it is difficult to think clearly or to concentrate on a specific task.

      My heart goes out to you. 🙂 I agree with your conclusion that it truly may be beneficial to find a specialist in your area who can assist you.

      A support group is also a wonderful idea! Being around others with similar struggles can truly give you a Safe place where you can relax and be yourself!

      You are in my prayers and I do pray that you will find the support and ‘safe place’ that you need (in fact this is something we ALL need!).

      God’s Blessings
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  98. Angelo

    Hi Justine
    I’m 17 years old.
    I scored 45 on this test and also 45/50 on the other test on other web site. Should I be worried?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Angelo 🙂
      I would not say you should be worried. If you are concerned then it may be a good idea to follow up further and seek a professional in your own local area who can help you with a formal diagnosis.

      You are still young and can learn social skills that can help you in the ‘real world’. I would encourage you to keep researching and see if you can connect with others in your area who have similar struggles to you.

      Let us know how you get on.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  99. Becky

    I just took your quiz and scored a 41 and a 38 on a similar test that had 31 as the starting score for likely. Only now, working in an autism class and doing research on my own, am I finding that I share so many traits with these students. It also explains social problems I have unfortunately had for soooo many years. It has been frustrating to say the least never quite fitting in on many levels. And misdiagnosed as a child, as shy and having social adjustment disorder.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Becky 🙂
      I truly appreciate you sharing your score with us and some of your own struggles.

      One thing I have found is that just knowing that you are not alone can be a powerful thing. 🙂 I know from personal experience that struggling to relate socially can be really difficult and even depressing sometimes, but I am glad that you are discovering more about autism spectrum disorders and hope that this will help you on your own journey.

      God Bless You, Becky 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Nathan
      You may want to follow up on your online test score and get a formal diagnosis if you decide to go that way. 🙂

      Justine

      Reply
  100. Graham

    Hi Justine, I was wondering at what score it would be a good idea to look into being tested on it. I’m 15 and scored 39 on the test. I have also heard that people diagnosed with aspergers have higher IQs than an average person, from what you know do you believe this to be true?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Graham
      It is totally a personal decision of when to seek a professional diagnosis, but as an indication if you get a score above 26 in the AQ Test then it may be a good idea to seek out a formal diagnosis.

      As you mentioned, there have been many occurrences of people with Asperger’s syndrome also having a higher than average IQ. This is not always the case though. The IQ does vary.

      Thanks again Graham for your questions.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  101. Elisa

    This was a pretty interesting quiz, and it works better than most of the other AS quizzes I’ve found online – I got a score of 28 and I’ve actually been diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome (I was a kid at the time, now I’m 26).

    I have a feeling my score would have been higher if I’d taken it years ago. I’ve had some “social situation” training over the years in the form of social therapy aimed at AS teens (for one year), high school, vocational school and work that requires customer service (I’m a library assistant with one year of experience, from five different libraries). Surprisingly enough, my workmates have always told me they never noticed anything wrong with my social skills – instead they noticed I was more meticulous at tasks than a normal person would be. …This is a far cry from what I was like as a teen. Back then I was having difficulty looking people in the eye and generally socializing – then I went into that social therapy once a week for a year and after those 52 days, the therapist noticed I was reasonably social and ended the sessions. It’s been a decade since then and I just keep getting better.

    So, to any parent who has an AS kid with social problems, social therapy is a good choice – just check if there’s any Asperger centers or the like around your area and if they’re holding any therapies. I’m from Finland and “The Finnish Association for Autism and Asperger´s Syndrome” has been organizing things like this since its founding in 1997.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Elisa
      I so appreciate you stopping by, taking the test and sharing your score and personal life experience with us. 🙂

      Your recommendation for parent’s of AS kids to use social therapy is a great suggestion! Skills that can be learned early on are sure to be of benefit later in life, as your own life proves!

      Thank you again Elisa. 🙂
      All the very best

      Justine

      Reply
  102. Nadia

    I scored 42.
    I’m 45 years old,never suspected I had Asperger’s the past 25 years I have been going from therapist to therapist collecting false diagnosis,everybody was saying their thing but never corresponded to what I was feeling,I was constantly passed by by jobs,relationships and society as I was left behind to fight all the sub symptoms.

    If it weren’t for my younger son who was diagnosed with AS in June,I would never ever have thought of me having AS. The expert who is attending my son,told me that I am a worse case than he is. And not only a worse case,i wanted to add,right now I am angry for the lost decades.I am angry at myself because when things get tough,all I want-all I ever wanted – to do is hide inside the house.

    I multitask heavily.I paint. I paint a lot. And when I paint,I don’t listen to anyone.I speak 8 languages and am learning some 7 more. It’s my hobby. Others don’t understand it so i stopped talking to people . The less they know about me,the less interaction & stress I am going to have. Simple way to face difficulties. I am on a self schedule for the past 2 decades to put under control the stress.I learned to read expressions again to avoid interaction.

    I like people. I would love to interact,be part of a companion,stuff like that and some people really like me too.But I don’t know how to keep a conversation or how to start one.If they like me is because it’s in my nature to see always the bright side of the people and not the bad one so I have been lied to plenty of times.I see my son and I want him to have a better life than the one I had. Because when I was growing up,nobody knew and tagging people as weirdos was so easy.And I think,that some are paying a fortune to obtain the weirdo look when I have it for free.

    Sorry for the extended text. Usually I don’t comment because I am afraid of the replies. Even on the Internet.But since I got the bug that I have AS,I feel like grieving.I called on the phone one of my therapists and I demanded an answer,a yes or a no because only she knew of my panic attacks,only she had diagnosed that I was suffering from agoraphobia,others said I was antisocial and whatever else you might think of. I thought I was suffering all the existing / known mental diseases.

    From a certain point of view I feel relieved. Sorry for any mistakes,English isn’t my native language also sorry again for occupying such a space,I usually try to vanish.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Nadia,
      I truly thank you for opening up and sharing your heart with us 🙂

      Let me say first up that I feel your pain! I really do. 🙁 I can only imagine the anger and frustration that you must feel at all of those diagnoses and the many years that have past!

      Are there any support groups for those with Aspergers in your area? If so then this may be a good place to begin to seek out some support and a safe place where you can be yourself and share some of your frustrations.

      Again thank you for sharing your struggles with us. I find that sometimes just by opening up (in a safe place) and sharing can lighten the load and relieve some of the stress. I hope it is the same for you. 🙂

      Also you did really well with your English. Nothing to be ashamed of there. 🙂

      Honestly you are very welcome to come back anytime to our website and to leave a comment or thought.

      I truly wish you and your precious son all the very best for the future.

      God Bless You
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  103. John

    Hi,I’m 16 years old and 2 or 3 years ago I was diagnosed with the Asperger’s.At first I didn’t know what was that (perhaps there are few 14-year-old teenagers who have any clue about the Asperger’s syndrome),but after searching for the symptoms,I was shocked.My only autistic traits were my lack of variety in my interests and the fact that I sometimes take the things too literally and,as a result,I don’t understand their true meaning (there are some jokes I don’t understand,for instance).But I don’t think it’s enough to meet the criteria for the Asperger’s Syndrome Diagnosis.So I took Simon Baron-Cohen’s test,and I scored 23.This enforced my suspicions of a misdiagnosis,because I scored below 26.This test was extremely useful for me,but,unfortunately,it can’t be used as a diagnosis tool.So I’m planning to see a new doctor,for a second opinion (and I hope he/she will tell me the truth,because I don’t think I have the Asperger’s syndrome).Because these days,I enjoy meetings with friends,I am really enthusiastical and I smile a lot.I have no problem with making the eye-contact.And I also play soccer quite well.My physical condition is not very good right now,but I can improve it at any time.I also like the billiards and the ping-pong.But the general idea is that I live quite a nice life.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi John
      Glad you stopped by and left your comment. 🙂

      It is probably a good idea to seek out a second opinion if you have doubts as to your diagnosis. I have a family member who was diagnosed as being on the spectrum with a certain condition and then many months later a different diagnosis was given. So from my experience, it is not always conclusive initially and it can definitely be worthwhile seeking out further medical advice.

      All the best and please stop by again.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  104. Maria Martinez

    Score 35, I’m 41 yrs old had anger and felt awkward around people all my life. My son was diagnosed with Autism 2 years ago, since then I started to doubt that I was Neuro typical….but sometimes I wonder if I’m trying to force myself into the Autistic group to fulfill the need as of why my boy is Autistic.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Maria
      Thanks for sharing your score with us 🙂

      It certainly can shake you up when a family member is diagnosed with Autism and make you question if you also are on the spectrum. The only way to know for sure is to get a formal diagnosis for yourself.

      I do wish you, your son and your family all the very best for the future!

      God’s Blessings
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  105. Tom

    Hi Justine

    Score = 37 Age = 45

    Of all the unique attributes applicable to ASD maintaining eye contact is the only aspect requiring my continued conscious management.

    It’s also true to say that having progressive parents specialising in what was described as remedial (in the 70’s) teaching and math helped in methodically evolving my social skills, academic potential and self awareness.

    Faithfully yours

    Tom

    Reply
  106. Brooke

    I scored 28 on the test and only started considering that I may have autism about a year back when somebody I knew pointed out that I was similar to one of my siblings who has autism. I plan on getting tested for it at some point this year (was one of my new years resolutions) but I don’t know what they would do for autism tests so I have been putting it off but were already halfway through the year and I know that I shouldn’t keep putting it off. Can anybody who has gone through diagnosis and tests, help?

    Reply
  107. Colm Trainor

    Hi everyone! I have a daughter with Aspergers and this got me wondering about why I have had so many social interaction problems in my own life, Just did the AQ test and scored 47, I need to hunt for a job (after nine year career break to be a carer) but the thought of the process freezes me with terror (the stupid self arrandisment of a CV, approaching new potential employers, mingling with strangers in a Job Centre etc etc. I think a formal diagnosis would be very very useful now (I am 54) but I dont think my local health Authority assesses adults anymore for ASD. (English Midlands)

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Colm
      Thanks for your comment about your daughter and yourself. 🙂

      Are you able to go to your local health authority that you mentioned and as them for their suggestion as to where you could pursue a formal diagnosis? That would probably be the best place to start your search.

      I hope you find somewhere that can assist you. 🙂 Please come back and let us know how you go.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Alan

      Hi Colm,

      My Clinical Psychologist has just referred me to the centre in Derby for a formal diagnosis, with a warning that there is a two year waiting list. She then mentioned that the local Consultant Psycholgist here in Chesterfield is taking an assessor’s course and should be qualified within a year.

      In either case, that’s the end of the support – there is no funding for treatment.

      Hope this may be of use to you.

      Cheers,
      Alan

      Reply
  108. Toby

    I am 35 and have suspected for 6 months that I may have aspergers. Looking at the various traits and signs, so many things from when I was younger and now make sooo much sense, not least the social isolation and that feeling of somehow being, ‘different’.
    I also suspect it is contributing to some serious relationship problems; we have just undergone a very high-stress house purchase that took 10 months followed by a load of renovation. My wife has struggled with the stress and she says I haven’t been there for her when I love her so much…but how I come across sounds completely at odds to how I feel, I cannot read her emotionally and take what she says literally (as I do most people..sound familiar?) that leads me to say or do the wrong thing.

    I did this test or (a similar one) twice about 6 months ago and scored in the mid-high thirties. Have done the one on this site today and come out at 40. I am interested in dates but my maths was/is poor and I am not bothered about routines, that doesn’t phase me. I enjoy presenting to people but because I know my topic and other people have to listen!! Small talk? Social conversation? HATE it. Cannot understand it and feel utterly utterly alone and isolated in social settings.

    Plucked up the courage to speak to the doctor last time…to be told it is not an illness and you cannot be medically tested! Thanks Doc. Great.

    Justine, the paragraph about struggling to conform from your comment from 30th May sums up particularly how I felt when i was younger.

    The comments by James P and Cara ring so true as do so many others on here.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Toby
      Great to hear your thoughts and experiences. Thanks for sharing them. 🙂

      The diagnostic process can be quite in depth and take time to complete. If it is something that you want to follow up with further then you will need to find someone (hopefully in your local area) who is familiar with Aspergers and Autism Spectrum Disorders. It sounds as if your doctor does not know about ASDs. But if you persist then you should be able to find someone who can take you through the diagnostic procedure, if that is what you decide to do.

      I had mentioned in an earlier reply about Susan Boyle, also from the UK, being diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome in the past year or so. It is just a matter of finding a professional who is familiar with it.

      Many mature aged people decide that a formal diagnosis is not really that necessary. It truly is an individual decision. 🙂 In your case with the relationship difficulties, perhaps it may benefit you and your wife to follow through and have a formal diagnosis. That way you could find strategies that work for you to help you and your wife better relate to each other. I know from personal experience that relationships are not always easy with these added challenges and different ways of relating and interpreting situations.

      Whatever you decide, I do thank you for sharing with us and hope to hear from you again in the future.

      God’s Richest Blessings, Toby over you and your wife 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
      • Toby

        Thanks, I think I will have to look into a formal diagnosis (if indeed I am on the spectrum). Anything else just risks it being labelled an ‘excuse’ .

        Unfortunately, it may already be too late for our relationship. The more she needed me, the more at a loss I became. I literally did not know what to say or do and something has changed now.

        It is funny, I have been reasonably successful in my life career-wise, partly (as someone else has said here) by simply copying how other people interact; my dad acted as a good role model. But personal skills between my partner, even close friends and other acquaintances? A struggle, all the time.

        Thank you, your website has been a useful outlet. Just seeing the other comments and how close they are to my experience has helped a little.

        T.

        Just wish I had seriously looked into it sooner.

        Reply
        • Justine

          Hey Toby
          Great to hear from you again. 🙂

          So sorry to hear of the continued struggles in your relationship with your wife. 🙁 My heart goes out to you as I know that relating to others in ways that they understand can be quite challenging!

          I am so glad to know that this website has been helpful, even if only a little. I also find reading others’ comments to be encouraging and it shows that you are not alone. Which is very powerful, I believe. 🙂

          I wish you all the best as you look into a formal diagnosis. Let us know how you get on.

          God’s Blessing be upon you, Toby 🙂
          Justine

          Reply
  109. Mark

    OK, I have a Facebook friend who has Asperger’s, so I just randomly asked what the symptoms were. He gave me several links to check, and the symptoms read like my life story. I had no idea there was a name for what I have experienced since I was a child. I am now 62, and just discovering the name for what I thought was “just being me”. I also have mild depression and some Tourette symptoms as well. I scored a 41 on the test…Thanks for this website, it’s good to know I am not the only one!

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Mark 🙂
      I appreciate you taking the time to leave your comment.

      I agree with you. It is a powerful thing knowing you are not alone!

      Take care and feel free to continue to visit and leave comments.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  110. Rebecca

    I am 39 years old. I tested here in the border-line range. I was told all throughout school I had a very high IQ.I have 3 children all teens.A daughter with Aspergers, 2 sons with Autism, one non-verbal.Their father also has a high IQ and some shared traits. Perhaps I was able to blend in all this time with neuro-typicals because I am a good student and learned how to try to fit in somehow. I blame myself for my children’s struggle.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Rebecca
      Thank you for leaving your comment 🙂

      I know it is not easy, but I encourage you to release yourself from the blame of the struggles your children are having! Life is certainly not easy many times, as I am sure you see most days of the week. And yet it is not your fault that things have turned out as they have in your children’s lives (it is no ones fault).

      You clearly love your children very much and as long as you can show them this love, as best as you can each day, that is the most wonderful gift you can give them. Your love will provide your kids with the best foundation to face this world that we live in! 🙂

      God Bless you and your precious family, Rebecca!
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  111. Isabell

    It is amazing to see so many people sharing their experiences here. Internet is just an amazing invention for those of us who always feel socially awkward, where we can share our feelings (which I really need: something to share to) with some anonymity and privacy.

    I am now 18 and scored 29 and 32 on two occasions. I have always suspected that I have slight Aspegers or HFA or at least some tendency of one of them ever since I have heard of them.

    I have kind of ruled out (low-functioning) autism as intellectual-wise I have always been one of the top in class in every subject except sports (in which I am an absolute idiot). I am good at thinking logically, analysing data and presenting my thoughts logically. I am really good at learning exam skills and get good results in every paper and pen based exam I do. (and not that well when it involves speaking and interviews) I performed well in both humanities and science and maths, which led to my decision in choosing humanities in GCSE level and switching to science at AS until now. I have to self-learning maths since 14 and never listened to the maths teacher since then but still got top results in a levels. Most of my time spent in chemistry lessons is also reading the notes myself and I now study chemistry in uni.

    I also love reading random stuff and acquire some extent of knowledge in every aspect. Although I study chemistry I also like literature, read classics, read about European history, read about psychology, solve puzzle, draw, play music, arrange music pieces and have philosophical thoughts (I have been pondering on problems of meaning of life, reality, existence and perception since I was small). I can self-learn most things if I wanted to with some assistance of the internet, including Photoshop. MediaWiki coding, Japanese etc. This may be due to how I hate the idea of asking people for help.

    Since I was small I dislike talking to people, especially those I do not know well. I am especially bad at handling social chitchats and getting to know people when there is large group. I never really learnt how to start a conversation and am still pretty bad at holding it. In fact I don’t know who’s who even for relatives on my father’s side: I never got to know them since I was small although we met often and it was only in recent years that I started to know their familial relationship with me (but still not their names and person). It is better on my mother’s side probably because there are fewer of them.

    And sometimes I just do not want to speak at all. I have always hated speaking test/interviews/presentations in school, especially group projects. I have a feeling that if speaking/talking is unnecessary in life that people and communicate without speaking, I would not speak at all. It is like that I had no choice but to speak, so I spoke, just to adapt to the environment.

    Even then I am not good at talking to people. People who do not know me well often feel that I have a bad attitude or is being rude towards them. There had been occasions like during school trip the customs told my teacher that I was being rude although I was just speaking plain truths and answering his questions without smiling and hugging him.

    I am really, really bad at recognising people’s faces. I think I am just developed in a way that my ability recognising human faces is far below average. The problem gets worse when I met large group of people who I did not know such as reception day before starting university, where I met fellow freshers and have to socialise and get to know some of them. I simply cannot match their faces with their names and I always had to pretend that I recognise them when we met in uni in other occasions.

    It takes a very long time for me to get to know people and to trust them as friends. I need a long time to get along with somebody, including people older than me such as teachers. This has been getting better as I got forced into social situations more and to make “friends” quickly.

    I tend to have less than average empathy and sympathy. Those tv ads on how African children are suffering simply had no effect on me. But then I do cry when I watch anime/films/tv series, maybe because I sometimes see some of myself/my experience in that and I would feel strongly. I have always admired characters who talked little/cold towards others and who is really intelligent/strong. I almost always fantasise and create a new character (myself) and put her into the story

    I can say that I cannot name anyone in my life I have ever met truly understands me, not even my parents, especially as my mind became more complex as time goes. There are simply some feelings or interests that I have no one to share with and I have started feeling that no one can understand me apart from myself, which kind of makes me feel lonely as I kind of want myself to be understood and have someone to love me the way I am.

    Sorry for making it that long. I just need somewhere to blurt everything out.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Isabell
      Please don’t apologize for leaving a long comment. 🙂 I am always happy to read the comments left by our visitors.

      I agree with you that it is nice to be able to open up and share struggles and feelings. Most people, including my family, also do not understand me most of the time, so I hear what you are saying about not being truly understood by others.

      It is difficult having others think you are being rude when you are just being yourself. 🙂

      I do truly wish you all the very best for the future and pray that you will find those who can really understand and love you for who you are.

      God Bless You.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Mike

      Hi Isabell,

      I came by this website because one of my friends who is doing her thesis on AQ recommended me to take this test. I diagnosed myself with Aspergers few years ago and have been interested in autism ever since. That and also my younger brother presents similar symptoms but more severe than mine.

      As for your comment, I can very much relate to my experience as well. When I was a kid, like 5-7 years old, I didn’t know how to make friends but I wanted to be a part of the other kids without making myself look awkward or weird to them. I always struggled to fit in with people. Even with my own family, I find it difficult to have a direct conversation about certain things, mostly personal ones. I also find it unnecessary to socialise with the rest of my family on my mother’s side(my parents are divorced when I was a kid and I stayed with my mom), because I felt like there is nothing really important to talk about. And like you, I have an obsession about the historical events like the Holy Crusade, Templars, Greek mythology etc and psychology because I wanted to understand what and how other people think. But I think the one important figure that I always wanted to be is Lelouch from Lelouch of The Rebellion anime. He was always alone but brilliant and managed to get through any adversity on his own with minimum reliance on anyone.

      I could go on and relate the similarities we have but it’ll take the whole page of this website haha. And I’ve always been good in online social networking but poorly in face to face interaction. I am, however, good in presentations. I could grab people’s attention by observing and studying their reactions and expressions. But the same does not apply in normal conversation. People always told me that I have a split personality in online and also real life. Like I’m a different person online and in person.

      I had a relationship with a girl 2 years ago. She was very patient and understanding but since I didn’t have any experience in relationship and my communication skills is quite poor when it comes to intimate stuff, we grew apart and finally broke up.. I thought my problems wouldn’t be a problem in our relationship but now that I think about it, maybe it does affect my relationship.

      Anyway, I just want you to know that I can understand what you’re going through and you’re not alone. 🙂 If you need someone to talk to about animes games and past events, just write to me. I can’t give my email here since it’s public but I hope Ms Justine could help that out since I’ve provided my email in the box.

      To be honest, I was relieved to know that there is someone who knows what I’m going through. At first, I thought I was the one who wrote that comment and checked the name few times to make sure it’s not me. Haha.

      “Whenever you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth! – Sherlock Holmes”

      Reply
  112. Shane

    I scored a 33. Well, no surprise there, I guess. I’m 28 and haven’t been diagnosed – a bit hard when I’m too shy to go to a doctor, haha.

    In any case, I started reading about Asperger’s a few weeks ago and it was like a light bulb lit up in my head in an instant. I plan on taking it further and getting an actual diagnosis, but gee, I have a feeling of “release” at the moment, as if a burden has been lifted from my shoulders. Even though this is just a short online quiz, it feels great to have a starting point, somewhere to begin to direct myself from, and it does reinforce a lot of the things I’ve read and have been feeling for at least 15 years now.

    Thank you for the quiz, and the site.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Shane 🙂
      Thanks heaps for your positive comments. I am so glad to hear that our website has been helpful and encouraging to you and others. That means heaps to me! 🙂

      It is pretty cool when the ‘light bulb goes on’ and you come to a better understanding of why you may be ‘different’ from others around you.

      Thank you again and all the best!
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  113. Peter

    Like Giles above, I have virtually zero faith in the medical profession, certainly at General Practitioner level (I don’t even have a GP these days!).

    Anyhow, I scored 44/50 on the above test, and also managed to get the pass mark on the rdos test (120/200). I don’t really need the services of anyone else to tell me I’m an Aspie, though I wouldn’t say no to formal confirmation if the process were straightforward – I suspect it isn’t for someone of my age in the UK.

    I have virtually every Aspie characteristic in the book, and reading the experiences on sites like Wrongplanet is virtually like reading my own life story.

    Good afternoon.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Thanks Peter for stopping by and taking the time to leave your comment. 🙂

      All the best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  114. Emily

    Hi, so I’m 16, and I scored 37. I’ve suspected for awhile that I have some type of a mental condition. In my whole life I can count the number of friends I’ve had on one hand, and I’ve moved more than four times, so I currently have no contact with any of them. I avoid anything and everything that is in any way social because I simply cannot relate to people. Sometimes people think that I haven’t noticed them or that I am ignoring them because I rely on body language to communicate and people think that a verbal response is appropriate for that situation. For example, if I see a friend in the hall I’ll nod at them once or simply meet their eyes, while they will wave and say hi. Later they’ll tell me about how they saw me but I didn’t notice them. I also can’t take loud sounds, but especially many quieter sounds at once with randomly placed louder sounds, like a hallway at school, or Costco on payday. I get overwhelmed and my heart starts to race. If I can’t get myself out of the situation I have what I think could be panic attacks and if I still for an extended period cannot escape the sounds I shrink down in posture and shut down to those around me. I have to go to school, there is no way to avoid noisy classrooms and hallways. I have told my mother a bit of this ,but not all and not that I suspect autism. I don’t think she’d believe me. Does anyone think I could have it an some form based on what I’ve shared?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      I appreciate you taking the time to open up and share with your comment. 🙂

      Please know that I have designed this website to help people with the Online test and support, but there is no way that this website can give a diagnosis. In fact, please be careful of anyone on the Net who says that they can give you a professional diagnosis! As they truly cannot!

      If you do want to pursue a formal diagnosis then you will need to follow up with someone that is familiar with autism spectrum disorders. If you are still at school then you may begin by speaking with the school counselor. Your family doctor may also be a good starting point. Both the counselor and doctor should be able to point you in the right direction towards a professional who can put you through the formal diagnosis process.

      Again thanks for commenting. I truly wish you all the very best.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  115. Dorotea

    I got 37. I don’t mind being the way I am, at all, as long as I’m alone, but other people don’t like me, and this gets me down. I saw my father go through life like this, being treated as an oddball (which he was)— I hate thinking that really, I’m like him. There is no escape from this, is there. I will alway be like this.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Friend 🙂
      I sincerely thank you for taking the time to leave your comment 🙂

      It is true for many of us, including me, that feeling ‘odd’ or not ‘normal’ can be really difficult (sometimes more than others)!

      What I find helps is to read other people’s stories and to hear the challenges that they are going through and overcoming! 🙂 That really encourages me.

      I remember years ago hearing a statement (I wish I could remember where I heard it 🙂 ), but it said something like, “There is power in knowing that I am not alone.”

      Often I have times where I am alone physically, but through reading books or ‘surfing’ Online I can find others who have had or are having similar experiences to me. This lets me know that in the grander scheme of things I am not truly alone.

      Thank you again for sharing. I wish you all the very best!
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Kris 🙂

      Please remember that these online tests are not a diagnosis. If you do want to pursue it further then you will need to seek a formal diagnosis through a professional that is familiar with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

      Take care
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  116. Upsidedownperson

    I somehow managed to get a score of 26, and I researched the symptoms, so I think that I might have Asperger’s syndrome. I fit only a couple of the symptoms, though, so I’m not sure. The symptoms I have are an inability to determine people’s emotions from looking at them, a very high intelligence level, and very strong interests. I also don’t like to do things (like book reports) in groups, though I have friends and we get along well. I’d like to meet with a specialist and find out if my suspicious are correct, though I think I might NOT have the disorder after all, because I only fit two symptoms, plus I’m very optimistic and love talking and I have some friends who love talking with me and often don’t exactly understand what I’m saying! I’m 11 btw.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi 🙂
      Thank you for sharing your score and a little about your life.

      It sounds like you are doing well and I encourage you to continue to learn and grow and enjoy life.

      Take care
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  117. Axeman

    AQ=13! I had trouble as a kid, lots of victimisation and learning difficulties, but definitely NOT Autistic/Aspergers!

    Reply
  118. Spence

    This test was interesting. I scored a 23, and the few other Asperger tests I’ve taken online have told me I don’t have it, but I suspect I might have it to some extent. The idea of having a mental disability never crossed my mind until a couple years ago when my parents were discussing them. My mom brought up Asperger’s and mentioned that my Kindergarden suspected that I might because I liked walking laps around the playground by myself at recess (I’ve never been diagnosed or anything, and my mom is skeptical I have any mental disability). I did more research, but it’s interesting how much of that stuff I USED to have, but no longer have to deal with as much now that I’m 20.
    – I am socially awkward, although I used to be much worse. I used to not like talking to new people, but I LOVED talking to people I did know. I had a hard time making friends, but now it’s easier and I can talk to pretty much anyone, but new people are still a challenge.
    – I was picked on a lot until around high school where I found myself fitting in better. People still “teased” me, but it was often in good faith, and I slowly warmed up to that. Pretty much everyone in my grade knew who I was, and I answered sometimes a dozen “Hi’s” in the hallway in one day.
    – I am an actor. I love performing, and I love delivering lines of dialogue. I have even won awards doing it. I’m not sure if it’s normal for people with Asperger’s to be good performers. It probably varies.
    – I used to use a lot of long words and talk with a lot of emphasis on each word, but this has lessened.
    – I talk at a normal pitch usually, but sometimes raise my voice while I’m going on about something without realizing it until someone points it out. I do get “lost” in certain subjects, but can tell when someone is slightly loosing interest and wants to move on.
    – I have somewhat narrow interests, but a few different ones. I obsess over certain movies/TV shows. I love watching them, and I watch a lot of the same stuff I watched when I was younger, but not everything. I have about 300 DVDs/Blu-rays in my collection. Sometimes I obsess over the behind-the-scenes stuff for movies/TV shows more than the actual program itself! But this is probably a side-effect to wanting to work in the entertainment industry.
    – If I’m slightly interested in something, I will research and learn about it until I get tired of it. I have a strong knowledge of “useless” information.
    – I’ve always been a great writer, and I’ve always been very good at History and English, but not so much with Math and Science, especially the Sciences that involve some Math like Chemistry and Physics.
    – I love reading and writing stories. I can easily loose myself into my writings, and they are usually on the long side. I particularly love horror, action/adventure, mystery, and suspense. For some reason, the paranormal and the occult fascinates me, and Halloween is my favorite holiday for sure.
    – I’m a disorganized person, very disorganized, hate following a schedule, and am a very bad procrastinator.
    – I have weird things that I fear like chickens and other large birds. I don’t know why, but I do NOT feel comfortable when being around them. That goes back as far as I can remember.
    – I have no allergies (other than pollen…), but I am a very picky eater. I have always hated popcorn and eggs (especially hard-boiled ones) in particular to the point where I don’t even want to TOUCH them. Both of those go back to when I was very young. I am open to trying new things unless I already dislike them.
    – I have some “ticks” like hand-flapping or tensing up, but only when I’m excited, and ONLY when I’m alone. I would never do either of those in public.
    – I have a very dry, sarcastic sense of humor, sometimes over-the-top, and I’m sometimes told I take jokes too far.
    – I’m a very honest, open person. Talking about things makes me feel better about certain things. If I’m with someone I’m comfortable with, I LOVE talking to them!
    – I usually know what things are going to offend someone, but sometimes I like getting “reactions” out of people by PURPOSEFULLY offending them to a small extent. My mom’s always pointed this out. Getting people angry and dramatic can actually be entertaining. I like ranting, and I like hearing other people rant, especially about things I’m annoyed with as well. I’m a very dramatic person.
    – I used to be shy about taking pictures, now I love taking selfies, but I make sure they’re flattering enough before I post them. I used to take a couple dozen pictures before talking one I was happy with. Now I’m not quite that bad.
    – I’m very picky about my appearance, and I prefer dressing fashionably. I’m not as bad though, and can deal with just putting on a t-shirt and jeans. The idea of someone finding me unattractive though is a scary thought, but if you want to put me in a good mood, just tell me how nice I look (that is, until I wonder if you’re only saying that to be nice)!
    – I can get easily offended at weird things, like if someone expresses dislike toward a movie/TV show I’m passionate about. It depends though.
    – I’m very anxious about social situations. If I commended on someone’s Facebook post, and they don’t “like” or respond to it, I just will assume I said something wrong and that they dislike me until they DO positively comment on or “like” another comment of mine. I’m trying to get over that though. If I send someone I know a friend request, and they deny it (I’ve gone to great lengths to find out how to tell if they do or not), it greatly troubles me, and I of course wonder if they like me or not, or find me creepy for trying to add them on Facebook. I find it a little strange that people I barely know would accept my friend request, but people I know very well wouldn’t!
    – I’m usually not comfortable being at a friend’s house for some reason. No idea why. I’m not as bad as I used to be though. I never even “went out” with friends until a couple months ago, but I can easily see myself doing that much more once I get my license.
    – Although, I’m generally pretty good at picking people’s personalities. I wouldn’t be typing this long post if I knew you would be a rather serious person. I can tell when someone’s laid back.
    – I have a very strong conscience, at least I think I do. I create fantasies, and have created bizarre fictional “fantasies” about my life, although not as much as I used to.
    – I like talking about myself, explaining this lengthy post! XD I normally don’t talk nearly this much about myself, but in this case, I don’t mind it at all.

    I know you can’t diagnose me or anything, and I’m not looking for that. I’m just sharing some key things about and why I suspect I might have (or might not have) Asperger’s. There’s no question that I’m an oddball! XD I’m just trying to discover a little bit more about myself.

    Thank you so much!

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Spence
      Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts with us 🙂

      You mentioned that you are an actor and wondered if people with Aspergers are actors or performers. I remember reading a few months ago about Dan Aykroyd from Ghost Busters having Asperger’s syndrome. I know Susan Boyle from the UK was diagnosed recently also. I would say it definitely varies from person to person, but there are performers out there who are on the spectrum.

      I appreciate all that you shared. I can relate to some of the things you wrote and others definitely are not me at all! 🙂 The world is made a more interesting place by us all being so different. Thanks again for opening up.

      Take care, Spence
      Justine

      Reply
  119. Robert

    Well, I scored a 40 on this test…and in various tests for Aspergers Disorder I have managed scores that seem to confirm the diagnosis. I think part of me still tries these tests because of what the Doctor, who diagnosed me with Aspergers, told me: these interactions with other people are probably never going to come easy or happen for me. The worst thing I find is that, suffering with co-morbid conditions, people seem to get tired of trying to help you…and invariably want to plug you back into a world on your own where things never seem to look good, positive or even tolerable. So I continue taking these tests, thinking one day I’ll come back as being negative for Aspergers, and then…perhaps then…I’ll be able to conquer the other challenges.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Robert
      Thanks for your comment. Sorry for my delay in replying. I have been away visiting family on a road trip. 🙂

      I do hear what you are saying. Overcoming various challenges each day can be very draining! It would be nice to wake up one day and not have to deal with them. But unfortunately that is not likely to happen. 🙂

      Can you join an Aspie support group in your area? This would allow you to connect with others having similar challenges in their life.

      I hope it all works out for you and that you find a way to move forward and enjoy a fulfilling life.

      God Bless you, Robert
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Lotti

      I feel your pain. I am almost 100% certain I am on the spectrum – I fit all of the criteria to the point that it’s like reading a manual on my brain, but I also have very complex mental health problems alongside. No one wants to know. Which is why I’m trying to seek out other individuals like me, to help me through these problems. People who understand are often key….

      Reply
  120. Loquacious

    Hi, I am 41 and can totally relate to a lot of what everyone has said. I know this is a reply a year later but I like to write. Its is really nice to see traits i have in other people.

    As a child i was very shy and socially awkward which led me to withdraw. School was not an environment that did me any good what so ever, it only pulled my confidence down even further. I never however saw myself as being different as i thought everyone else was strange!! (I still don’t to be honest) Why did they ask the questions like ‘how are you?’ when they obviously never wanted to know the real answer? (I know this as i tested it out and when you start to say what a horrid day your having the individual who asked would make an excuse that they had to leave) I did find this amusing.

    I made my biggest obsession my career choice! That was psychology and then a lecturer, I find this work fascinating and fun, people are amazing and strange at the same time. I was told as a child i would never be anything as i scored very low on all tests and was labeled with dyslexia and dyspraxia they also wanted me to have the label of autism but i asked what that would get me and they said nothing so I didn’t want it (as not beneficial) The other 2 labels got me a laptop and other bits so i didn’t mind them.

    The reason I wanted to write is that we can all be anything we want to be in life and it is possible to learn how people behave and react, I still don’t always get it right and i am known for being blunt and pointing out the obvious. I am lecturing and can spot my traits in others, I use this to my advantage and understand the difficulty they have in a classroom environment (they get good grades!!!). I believe everyone should use their strengths and not the strengths of others. It works and takes the burden off people to fit in.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Thank you for leaving your comment and thoughts here. I appreciate what you had to share.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  121. Sam

    I have done several of these tests recently and I have consistently got scores in the 30’s. Looking at different sites and what they say is common for Asperger’s synndrome sufferers, I have a feeling I might have it. I would like to get a diagnosis to find out for certain whether I do have it or not.

    I feel very nervous about suggesting the possibility to my Parents though. I once suggested to my Mum that I might possibly have a mental disorder and she quickly dismissed the possibility. I’m worried that if I bring it up, she might dismiss it again without thinking about it. I am also worried that there might be big costs involved in a diagnosis, which is something we can do without in my home, especially if it comes back negative. I have a friend who has Asperger’s syndrome and I am very different to him in a lot of ways,. I know that each case is unique, but I still feel confused and worried about suggesting it to my parents. Do you have any suggestions as to how I should proceed?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Sam
      Thank you so much for leaving your comment.

      I hear what you are saying. Honestly sharing concerns with family members is not something that I have ever found easy! In fact, when I have shared with my own parents and family about having Asperger’s syndrome, they just brushed me off and dismissed what I said.

      So I honestly do not have a good answer for your question. 🙁

      Is there a trusted adult in your life, perhaps a relative or teacher or leader at church or in your community etc that you could open up to and share your concerns with? If so then perhaps this may be a good starting point if your parents do not seem open to hearing your concerns directly.

      This trusted person could then possibly go with you while you express yourself to your family.

      This is just a thought. I would be happy to hear what others think. Please leave a comment if you have any ideas that would make it easier to share such concerns with parents or family members.

      All the very best! Please be sure to let us know how you get on.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  122. Liz

    To begin with, I would just like to clarify that my real name is not Liz (For obvious reasons). I am a 16 year old girl and am concerned that I may have asperger’s syndrome, as I scored 40 on this test, and as a follow up I completed the EQ, on which I only scored 9. I was first led to research the condition as a result of a several remarks which others have made, suggesting that I am in some way abnormal or disabled. Certainly, I fit some of the symptoms, but not all of them. The following is a list of possible symptoms I have identified within myself, other general oddities which may in fact be symptoms and ways in which I do not fit the general description of aspergers:

    I am, and always have been, very clumsy and have terrible spatial awareness.
    I have trouble sleeping – I cannot sleep unless it is silent and pitch black and even then I have trouble switching my brain off.
    I do not speak in a monotone, however I have a posh voice for no apparent reason; I live near Liverpool, so nobody I know sounds like me. In addition, I cannot put on accents.
    I dislike social situations with people my age and always feel awkward with social chitchat, struggling to maintain conversation
    I speak very loudly – I have always attributed this to the fact that my brother used to be almost deaf, but it could be something more
    I am very particular about a number of things including the light intensity in my bedroom whilst I am working and sleeping. Bizarrely, I cannot brush my teeth whilst others are in the room.
    I am a terrible dancer to the extent that I refuse to do it in front of others.
    I often act innapropriately and when i try to take part in friendly teasing I am accused of being offensive
    I do not rock up and down, but I do tap my feet on the floor and bounce my legs involuntarily; apparently I am very distracting to sit behind in class or exams.
    I have little interest in the things that preoccupy my friends
    I do not have a special interest exactly – I show interest in pretty much everything and can act obseeively about these things. I do have a lifelong obsession and skill in History
    I am of above average intelligence but maths is actually my worst subject
    – having said that I would estimate that I am still in the top 15% of the population. My skill comes in analysis – I excel at History and Geography, and enjoy writing essays on these topics.
    I am part of a large friendship group but am not close with anyone (I see them more as allies than as friends)
    I often zone out during conversations, particularly if I am not interested
    I am actually very disorganised and have awful handwriting.
    When I was younger, I enjoyed playing with dolls and Lego, however my games usually revolved around revolutions, wars and natural disasters.
    I did not have imaginary friends, but I had imaginary place such as the ‘ Warrington Car Shop’
    I always insisted that games were realistic – they could have supernatural elements but only if they followed a set of rules
    I often find myself wondering about the concepts of reality, existence and our perception of the universe as well as about human behaviours
    I dislike people taking my things without permission – unfortunately due to my response, people occasionally do this on purpose.
    I do not like talking about emotions with others, including my immediate family. I prefer to keep myself to myself, even if it is lonely.
    I have a tendency to inadvertently embarrass myself. For example, I correctly answered all of the bonus questions on a history test despite having not revised. When an intelligent but lazy classmate accused me of lying, I responded that I was not; in fact I have a book on the subject. This was a source of much hilarity to the class.
    I frequently bottle up my emotions and then have a meltdown
    I struggle to remember verbal instructions and often fail to hear what is said to me; however I can hear small noises such as the hum of electrical appliances (caused by transformers). I suppose it could be described as selective hearing.
    If I am reading, I am unlikely to notice you, even if you are shouting at me.
    It also struggle with art, music and technology.
    I am not asexual, but have been asked if I am – the truth is I simply do not like to discuss it.

    Well that’s about it really. Maybe I have asperger’s or maybe I don’t. I would like a diagnosis for my own peace of mind, but would not tell anyone, including my parents, if I did get one. However, in order to get a diagnosis I would have to tell my parents – therefore I believe it may be best to wait until I go to university. So, in conclusion I ask you this: in your opinion is it likely that I have asperger’s syndrome, and if so, how should I procced?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Liz 🙂
      I really appreciate you sharing some of your own life experiences with us. 🙂

      You ask me the question about whether I think you may or may not have asperger’s syndrome. But there is no way that I (or any online test) could give you a diagnosis. Sorry about that. The online test is just an indication.

      If you do not want to tell your parents at this stage then it may be best, as you said, to wait until you are a little older and head off to university. You can then follow up further with going through the process of a diagnosis.

      What I will say is that in the meantime, before university, why not do some further research and see what else you can find out on this topic of autism, spectrum disorders etc? Any research you do certainly couldn’t hurt and may be helpful in your search for answers. 🙂

      Take care, Liz and all the very best for the future.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  123. Amanda

    I’ll never forget when I was about 12 I was reading about autism in an encyclopedia and amongst other things, in particular a certain characteristic stuck it to me, autistic people have trouble relating to others such as problems with asking normal, every day questions like, “How is your job?” “How is Brenda, your wife? ” I realized that not only did I never asked people questions like that but it was why I never knew anyone children’s names, spouse’s name, where they went to school or where they worked. not only did I not know but I really didn’t feel like I cared. And in my mind if I did not care why would I be fake and ask questions I didn’t want to know?

    of course, I don’t know a normal child who reads encyclopedias for fun, but that’s who I was. Not only that, I was greatly fascinated with numbers. It has led to obsessions that I still currently study such as astrology as well as numerology. Of course, those are not my only obsessions. I change every so often and choose to obsess over another thing all at once. This changes between video games, animes or other cartoons, different religions, or different aspects of science that peak my interest.

    not only will I obsessed with them, but I will shut out everyone else around me while I delve into these different projects and stay up all night. I would say anime took a big a hold of my life and perhaps even helped me. That is when I started drawing anime, which I did obsessively, to the point where I covered my entire room wall to wall with drawings side by side as if it were some sort of wallpaper. And to me this was normal. It still is. I may not display it in the same way but I keep all of them in boxes in love to look at them and remember when I drew them and then imagine different things about them. At around 12 or 13 I also created my own anime character that was basically just me, I didn’t feel comfortable with changing my look even though the possibilities are endless I still kept my brown hair, though I did make my eyes green instead of brown in that has always bothered me lol. to this day I still love to imagine my character not only in my favorite animes but a different ones that I made up. I also have made up entire animes and I actually enjoy mulling over them in my head at night to more than I do sharing them with people.

    I have always felt that everyone else was weird, and that I was one of the few normal people in the world, even though everyone else was always calling me weird. Everyone. When I was younger social situations scared the ever living daylights out of me. when adults would talk to me I would just stare at them and when they pointed out that I was quiet or not talking I would run away and hide. I spent most of my time daydreaming or talking to my pets like my dog, I really felt like I could understand her and she could understand me. When I was confronted by people, especially strangers or children my own age I would become so terrified I would feel as if I would pee my pants, Though I never did, thank God lol, it would make me so paralyzed with fear that I would just sit there and stare. People thought I was so strange, in fact people still do call me strange. to make it worse, when I finally would talk I would talk so loud, that everyone would tell me to be quiet, and when I thought I was quiet I was still loud. It hurts so much to be criticized that it would make me not want to talk even more. I’m 29 today and people still tell me I talk too loud and too much lol but now I just tell them that’s who I am and they couldn’t basically deal with it or not hang out with me is my attitude on the issue.

    as I became older I acquired another obsession, studying people’s personalities and psychology. I wanted to know how people communicated “normally” and how to tell what they were thinking because understanding it on my own I could not. I also studied the way people who were considered popular acted, I’d watch them in real life and on TV, I would watch the ones who were considered powerful and strong and see what traits they possessed that made them that way, that made them different from the others. Then, after pushing myself and submerging my life into things like Taekwondo, which was terrifying because they wanted me to make a yell noise when I kicked and it was absolutely embarrassing even though everyone else did it, I eventually did some solo traveling and put myself in positions to be alone and learn how to respond to people. It wasn’t until after I was 20 years old that I finally found my voice. I’m not even sure if any of the studying did it, it wasn’t until someone tried to fight me, which I always did sports, I am strong but still had this social anxiety that made me feel weaker than everyone, and even though I did not want to fight they still attacke me and I was forced to defend myself, in which I absolutely dominated them lol. I think it was then, when I realized that even if they did scare me emotionally, that physically they could not do anything to me, that I was no longer so terrified. I made myself go to parties and made myself interact with people, which also my mother always forced me to interact with people and told me that I would not be a shy girl because women were not shy in our family, so I forced myself to learn the way of the normal people, to smile and ask questions about their own life and not talk so much sit my own, to speak up even when I was scared.

    the test as I am now, it came out as a 27. I took it several times to make sure and took it months ago to make sure that I was answering truthfully, not just how I wanted to be. I also took the test while making answers as how I would think when I was younger, & I got a 38. I’m pretty sure that its not higher because I’m really loud when I do talk and I have ADHD, but all I can say is that I just wanted to share my own struggles in point of view, reading everyone else’s point of view made me feel really good about myself today. I don’t feel so weird anymore. & I feel good knowing that I’ve been able to change it somewhat since I was a child. I still struggle with relating to people and knowing what I do hurt them more than I realize but I still feel like there is hope that I can still improve everyday. Thank you for your test and thank all of you for sharing.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Amanda
      Thank you so very much for stopping by and opening up your heart to us. 🙂

      I am so glad that you have enjoyed reading other people’s struggles and journeys on our website. That is one of my main aims and desires that we will be able to be a blessing and strength to others (even if only in small ways 🙂 ).

      Again thank you for sharing. Please feel free to return and share again in the future.

      Many Blessings,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Denny

      Amanda,

      Your life synopsis is so strikingly similar mine, it feels as if you almost literally wrote it based upon my life events

      Thank you for courageously sharing and opening your heart up as it means very much.

      Godspeid to you.

      Best regards,

      Denny

      Reply
  124. Rebecca

    Hi! I’m 16 and got a 44 on the test. I’ve noticed symptoms for a long time now, but I don’t have anyone to talk to about this. My parents don’t really think much of stuff like this and even scoff at my cousin who has OCD. I get don’t do well at all trying to talk with people and I’m awkward even around friends I’ve grown up with. I feel like there should are “rules” for society but I just don’t know them, and I always feel like I’m going to do or say something wrong. Any research I’ve done has been on my own but I’ve read a lot about mental disorders and I feel like I can’t trust myself to think I have something because maybe I’ve just been reading too much and am just over-relating to everything I read. But then again, I really can’t handle social stuff. I’m pretty sure I also have some OCD too (things have to be just right and I’ve got a strange attraction for 4’s so much that I have to take steps in 4’s and eat 4 of things). At dinners I’ve almost had severe breakdowns just from not knowing where I should be sitting (or if there aren’t the right amount of noodles in my pasta to eat in groups of 4). In school I’m the smartest person in the grade taking all the advanced classes, but I just can’t deal with the people there and always find a way to do a group project on my own. I am involved in activities like debate but I don’t debate with a partner and do work on my own.

    How do I bring up something like this or seek help? Mostly I just deal by excusing myself to the bathroom before I breakdown and start crying, or I hold in the things that get to me till I’m safe in my room and can cry it out. Luckily my parents never walk in on me crying, but I don’t know what I’d do if they did. I’ve been struggling with this for over a year now. I’ve thought about keeping a journal, but I can’t think of anywhere to put it where someone won’t find it. My parents never look through my stuff or anything like that, but I still can’t get over the fear that someone would find it.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Rebecca 🙂
      I truly appreciate you leaving your comment and questions.

      Struggling to find someone to talk to about difficulties and concerns is something that I can also related to. So my heart goes out to you! I have not found any easy solution to this problem.

      Can I suggest that you find a trusted adult in your life who you can open up to and share your concerns and feelings with. A family member or relative is a good place to start if they are available. If not then a trusted leader or teacher, perhaps even a school counselor may be a person you could share your struggles with.

      I honestly wish there was a quick and easy way to open up and share with parents, family members and others, but I have not yet found one.

      Please know that you are not alone! Others have struggled (and are still struggling) with this same problem.

      I truly wish you all the best in your search for answers and I hope to hear from you again.

      God’s Blessings,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  125. Lily

    hey, i dont know if anyone will actually answer this, i see its been a while, but ill have a go anyway!

    so i scored 41, and my friends (the two friends i have made) are convinced i have aspergers, and when i reading about it, a see myself a lot, and i think its fun!
    but i was sent to a therapist because i hit a couple of my classmates, which i think they deserved, and i had very high levels of anxiety because i was starting high school!

    i take drama, and ive always been acting, my mother is an actress and my father is a musician, so my mother taught me a lot about people, and i read people fairly well, and i can pretend to understand, but truth is im horrible in social situations and ive been bullied so much for being weird. so i hide it really well, but i just do this so that people wont throw milk at me!

    point is, my therapist doesnt see this, she thinks im doing fine, and that i care a lot about my looks and how people see me, and that i couldnt have aspergers, but shes not experienced with autism in any form at all, so is there a chance i might have it after all?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Lily
      Thanks for stopping by and sharing some of your life with us.

      In answer to your question, what I would say is to search for a professional who is familiar with the spectrum and ASDs. It is impossible for me to read what you have written and to give a diagnosis. In fact, anyone who says that they can do this is not being honest with you.

      So find a professional who is familiar with autism spectrum disorders and then ask them would they please give you a diagnosis.

      It is important to keep in mind as well that often people may have more than one condition or disorder. If this is the case then it may be difficult to properly diagnose without a lot of time being invested to really find out what is going on.

      Let us know what you find out after you see a professional who has expertise in the field of autism and ASD.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  126. Matt

    If the spectrum more or less follows a normal distribution curve, aren’t people with a very low score just as ‘abnormal’ as those with a very high score. Do we give a name to any disorders for those with extremely low scores?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Matt
      That is a very good question. One to which I do not currently know the answer. I would be happy for others to comment if you do indeed know if there is a name for any known condition that may be indicated by very low scores.

      If I am able to find out an answer for you then I will add that comment at a later date.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
      • Sana

        This is a bit of a late reply, so I don’t know if you’ll see this response or not, but I had the same question (having taken this test in a fit of late-night boredom and got a score of 9) and did a bit of research a while back. As it tirns out, there isn’t a specific name for it, but its recognised that there are people who are overly empathetic and hypersocial, but often have learning disabilities (such as dyslexia) or problems with executive function, memory, and focus, who tend to be the ones who score very low on AQ tests. This is similar to what is seen in WIlliams Syndrome (sometimes mistakenly termed the ‘opposite of autism’) but that has a lot of other, more specific connotations as well. While left brain/right brain is mostly just a useful analogy rather than a physiological truth, it would make sense that if Aspergers and Autism represent an ‘extreme left brain’, as some researchers have suggested, there is probably a right brained counterpart.

        Reply
        • Justine

          Hi Sana
          Thank you for your interesting comment. I was not at all familiar with Williams Syndrome, but have now done some reading on it since your comment. 🙂

          Thanks again for sharing.

          All the best,
          Justine 🙂

          Reply
  127. Simone

    Hi, Justine. I’m a thirteen year old girl and I’ve been suspecting that I have Aspergers for a while. I took the test and got 33. I have quite a few autistic traits:

    I get travel sickness

    I hate the feel of certain materials and the sound of people touching them. I also love some materials (mainly sponges and bristles). I actually chew sponges :/

    I get obsessed with tv shows or books

    I dislike parties because I have to shout to be heard and they make me feel ‘smothered’.

    I have AWFUL social skills. I am painfully shy and don’t make friends unless someone else starts a conversation with me. When I was little, I was oblivious to social expectations. I hated games which involve imagination so, when other people in my class asked me to play (I was very popular, to start off with, because I was very clever and people found me interesting), I would just say no, instead of even attempting to socialize. I tended to just have one special friend (in fact, my best friend of about 4 years was a girl who had an autistic brother). I still have bad social skills now, but mainly because I fail to admit when I’m wrong. I now overthink social situations and feel self conscious. But, when I am with my very best friends, I can’t shut up. I talk really loudly and always bring up my obsessions. I can still talk about what my friends talk about, but I keep saying things that are considered ‘weird’ and there are a lot of awkward pauses.

    I hate eye contact because it makes me feel exposed.

    I am very musical.

    I have low empathy (my EQ is 14)

    I am bad at sports, have low stamina, and have bad posture. I am also double jointed, so that may be due to low muscle tone. I am also short sighted, but I dont know if that means anything.

    I verbalise all of my thoughts

    I talk to myself and plan scenarios in my head.

    I speak in a monotone and speak very quickly.

    I notice small details that others don’t

    I am a visual learner

    I get distracted with tasks that I don’t want to do. I also need a lot of motivation to do things.

    I rock backwards and forwards sometimes when I feel relaxed. I also always fiddle with things

    Do you think I have aspergers? thanks

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Simone
      I truly appreciate you leaving your comment and question.

      I do need to clarify though that I have no way to give a diagnosis of Aspergers or not. The only way for you to get an accurate diagnosis is to follow up with a professional who is familiar with autism spectrum disorders and Asperger’s syndrome. They can then take you through the process of being diagnosed.

      One of the best places to begin may be your family doctor who may be able to help directly or to give you a referral to someone who is more specialized in the ASD field.

      I truly do wish you all the very best in finding answers to your questions and receiving a diagnosis, if that is what you decide you want.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  128. Alex

    Hello Justine, my given name, abbreviated, is Alex. I took the Asperger’s/AQ Test five times, with resulting scores of 42, 40. 41. 42, and 39.

    Throughout my nineteen years, seven months and twenty-seven days of existence I have noticed that many people tend to differ in how they approach particular subjects. For an example, when I become attached to a particular subject of interest, I find it quite difficult to properly allocate an appropriate amount of time for said subject to be researched, practised, and or simply contemplated. Relatedly, I have been told that my time management skills are very poor, in which I become so engrossed in particular subjects that I tend to defocus on the “significance” of other such subjects. Subjects such as: bodily hygiene, physical activity, and or a ritual consumption of foods. Yet, I have determined that this is due to my innate inability to perceive any one thing with lesser or greater significance than others.

    With the exception of my personal, subjective interest, in a variety of subjects I can still understand that my opinion of the matter will not be reciprocated by every other person in this world. Therefore, I deem everything to be significant to someone, many, or few people. I do not think that what I think is significantly interesting is any less interesting than what someone else might find to be significantly interest, and that’s interesting. What I find interesting about this is the fact that I accept that it is highly likely that everyone will bear a different opinion, yet I find it especially perplexing, despite this knowledge, when someone does not appreciate what I do specifically. I do not know how someone can appreciate the impulsive act of washing one’s face contrary to researching the most appropriate means by which one may wash one’s face without negatively affecting its surface area (e.g.: soft skin). Yet, I can appreciate the notion of acting upon what is felt contrary to what is thought. Because my compulsive tendencies can also be correlated with a ‘feeling of a thought’, as a particular kinetic expression of my internal processing. Therefore I can sympathize with the notion, but find it difficult to empathize with the act. It’s odd, and some of highlighted that seemingly contradictory aspect of me.

    Furthermore, I have recognized that my above paragraphs may appear to especially tangential and so I will now deviate from the focus of my own experiences and correlate them with the relevant topic, being Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome more specifically.
    There was a book that I read in Grade 11, which entailed the processive life of a seemingly socially dysfunctional character. The character was described by my educator as being “weird when compared to most people”, but I found many of his processes to be quite normal. For an example. when his character categorized an emotional and cognitive understanding of sequences within days by the choice of colour and his subjective/emotional understanding of them, I recognized a parallel in what I deem to be “chaotic moments”, “shut downs”, “Leprechaun Day”, and my “Off Day”, in which I seem to be processing a state of selective mutism. It was once quite difficult for me to describe what exactly triggers my selective mutism, and my educators thought that I was “being immature” or “disrespectful” towards them because of so. During that state I could process what they were saying, but I felt their words were very distant and superficial. Everything had been hyper-sensitized in these moments, and I found it quite difficult to focus on everything that was occurring without being overstimulated. I later factored that the auditory levels of my educators’ voices, expressing what I thought were anger or sadness, were too chaotically intermixed with the various disturbances that were also taking place. When I heard of multiple people conversing about various topics from multiple points in the room at multiple frequencies and multiple tones I became very distraught and my brain wanted to simply turn off. Perhaps, in this analogy, as a laptop might when it is processing too much information for it to properly operate. My computer was that brain, or vice versa, and it would ‘shut down’ various processes in order for it to preserve its own internal energy. I suppose that when I entered this state or mode, as I prefer to refer to it, I would initiate a form of escapism, in which I could mentally detach from everything and regenerate my own grasp of everything at hand. Although, the time elapsed always varied and sometimes I would find that I was in that mode for an excessive amount of hours, sometimes even days. This mode correlated with that character and he did not seem abnormal at all. In fact, I wondered as to why he was perceived as abnormal when I thought that the general behaviour and interests of my peers and educator were weird, and that contradicted with the context of the connotations they were attributing the character with and this just did not ‘sit right’ with me.
    So, as I progressed through the book, I realized that the character shared an acute characteristic with me. He would focus on details, and I focus on details! It was an astonishing revelation, to finally realize that I was not adrift a class of abnormally behaving people – despite the majority of them, which would, logically, dismiss the accuracy of the term I described them with – but actually a person with perceptibly ‘abnormal’ characteristics! This revelation also elucidated the reason as to why I was somewhat ostracized and not selected for partial interactions. It was very fascinating to learn that I was so much like that character! Then… I reassessed the character and acknowledged the fact that he had been noted to have a diagnosed condition of Asperger’s Disorder, falling under the Autistic Spectrum Disorder. When I realized that my behavioural traits, correlated so accurately with that character’s, were so common with people whom have been diagnosed with having conditions of autism and or Asperger’s, I was confounded! I never, not at one point, considered myself to have autism, but I did, somehow, suspect that my second-eldest sister had/has autism. Which she probably does, I should add. But I didn’t realize that what I thought was ‘autistic’ about her actually was also evident in myself. Except, I think that she is slightly less high-functioning. With all due respects and no intent of condescension, she always required more help with some ‘basic’ things and learned quite slowly. But my sister possessed/possesses an acute trace of long-term selective memory, which is also evident in me.

    I just noticed that I probably had another tangent, which my Grade 12 English educator might have reprimanded me on. Hahaha. It’s funny because it is true. (He did not appreciate my tendency to write in a specifically abstract manner.)

    So, anyway, with everything noted and a few things not, I happened upon this quiz (through referral) and scored the above five scores. I was in denial for awhile, but reconnected with my biological father who has been diagnosed with having Asperger’s Disorder by his mother’s friend, who is a registered Psychologist, and his brother who is a general physician and practitioner of doctoral medicine. I realize now that it is highly probably for me to have Asperger’s Disorder or Autism, but I also realize that I am financially unable to afford a private consultation with a licensed practitioner. I am curious if there is any way I might be able to contact one free of charge? I am not certain, because I am aware that many people establish there own firms with the intent on covering the overhead and overall expenses associated with their occupation.

    Anyway, it was nice to have read eight of the responses on this page. I do hope that my reply is responded to, because I do not usually divulge so much personal information. Well, sometimes I do, but I have been told that there is “a time and a place” for everything and some matters I should not discuss. Such as my own personal hygiene, which I suppose I have mentioned. Sorry mother! (Not really, teehee)

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Alex
      Thank you for taking the test (5 times! 🙂 ) and sharing your results with us.
      Thanks too for your comprehensive comment and information on your life.

      You do ask about obtaining a free consultation with a professional in order to discuss whether you may also have Asperger’s syndrome. I honestly do not know of any such free practitioners at this time.

      What I would suggest is searching for a local support group for those with Aspergers or an ASD. If you can find such a group near you then you could go along and ask the group for any recommendations. These would be the best people to help you in your own local region.

      I hope this helps some and I look forward to hearing from you again down the track. 🙂

      Take care, Alex
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  129. Mollie

    I got a score of 41. This is something to tell my mother as she complains and gets mad at me when we are in social situations. Especially when I am ready to go home. This explains a lot. My friend suggested that I take this test.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Mollie
      Thank you for sharing your score and comment 🙂

      It is true that having some understanding as to why we react or behave in certain ways can be quite helpful. Not just helpful for ourselves, but also for loved ones who sometimes struggle to understand.

      So I am glad you can sit down and talk about this with your mother. 🙂

      God bless you.
      Justine

      Reply
  130. Marcus

    Hi!
    I was suspected to have bipolar disorder 1 but the doctor said the diagnosis was still indifinite. My score for this AQ test is 35 in my first try and 39 in my second try. My score indicates that I have strong likelihood of asperger syndrome or autism. I want to know if I really have since I there is no professional specialized in asperger in my place.

    This AQ test you shared is a big help.
    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Marcus 🙂
      Thanks for your comment and question.

      Honestly, I am not able to tell you if have asperger’s syndrome or any other autism spectrum disorder. For that you need to go to a professional who will take you through the diagnosis process.

      Since you have no such professional in your area, I am not sure what to tell you. Perhaps you can talk with your family doctor and share your concerns with them. Ask if they can refer you or if they know where you can go for a formal diagnosis.

      Let us know what you find out.
      All the best,
      Justine

      Reply
  131. Kristjan Birnir

    Hello, I just took the asperger test, scored 27, I dont know how accurate this score is, since Im not native on English so it could be the case of not grasping the proper meaning in some of questions so the score could be higer or lower depends on that, but in some questions though i feelt that it depened on the situation whether or not how i reacted to it.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Kristjan
      Thanks for your comment. Please note that the test gives you a score, which is only an indication of the possibility of being in the spectrum. It is NOT a diagnosis or any definite conclusion.

      The best way for you to find out for sure is to seek out a formal diagnosis from a doctor.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  132. Bell

    Hi Justine,

    Thank you for setting up this page and being so open to feedback. I just took the AQ test for myself (I got 8) and on behalf of my son (which I am sure is impossible to do really, but hey its just for an indication) He is 20 years old and does have some traits, but is very high functioning. I got a 24 score for him. My issue is an odd one and I am not sure you can help but, need to share.

    My partner of 3 and a half years suggested my son (and mum and sister) might be on the spectrum and I can see why now, although at first I was very resistant to the idea. My partner is a teacher and has studied ASD and worked with people with special needs a lot. But I think he is a bit obsessed with ASD and tonight suggested I might be on the spectrum because I describes a range of feelings (confusion, shame, distrust) that I had to a situation, rather then looking further into my feelings, he thought they had a ‘colour’ as if on the spectrum.

    Whereas I think they were related to past experiences of trauma in my adult life.

    Anyway I wonder if he is being reasonable about any of this. Is it helpful to suggest a diagnosis to people? How helpful is a diagnosis if the range of symptoms and behaviors are so varied? In the case of people who are very high functioning, but might have specific ‘quirks’ is it not more helpful to deal with individual behaviors?

    Is my partner obsessed? Or am I just being defensive!!?

    If you can answer all or any of this, well done.

    Thanks for creating a space for speaking.

    Bell

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Bell 🙂
      Thank you for your comment.

      You asked about getting a diagnosis. My opinion is that the need for a diagnosis varies from person to person and situation to situation. If a child or teenager is involved, I would say that more times than not it can be an advantage and very helpful to have a formal diagnosis. In the case of children and teens additional assistance can often be given at school and skills can be taught that will help the young person throughout his or her life.

      As an adult it can sometimes also be helpful to obtain a professional diagnosis, but it is certainly not always necessary. Often we learn skills along the way to ‘fit’ into society and various social settings etc. So unless you are greatly concerned then, as an adult, a diagnosis may not be needed. 🙂

      I agree with what you are saying that past traumatic experiences can certainly impact on how we perceive things and how we react in certain situations. If this is something that is bothering you then for sure seek out a doctor who is familiar with ASD and pursue answers. But if you feel you are coping well with life, for the most part, then this step may not be necessary.

      What I would say though is to talk about it with your partner, if he is open to that without making you feel you must get a diagnosis. Otherwise find a trusted person that you can talk with so that you can process the emotions and behaviors rather than feeling like you need to ‘stuff’ them inside and hide them.

      Thanks again for visiting our website. Please come back and let us know how you get on. 🙂

      Take care,
      Justine

      Reply
  133. Catherine

    Hi, my names Catherine I’m 28 and I got a score of 34. I took a few similar tests on other sites and they all gave me similar scores. Every site recommended going to a doctor to get tested for aspergers, which suprised me because even though I have always been uncomfortable around people, I have been able to function fairly well. I know I am introverted, and that social situations with people I don’t know well freak me out. I hate being the center of attention, and I get really nervous when I have to talk to a group of people. I have done some research on aspergers and some of the symptoms and some of the comments I have read do sound like me. I am a huge klutz, and I hate going to clubs and crowded places because they are so loud and the noise hurts my ears. My dad always has the T.V. loud because he is partially deaf in one ear and I can’t stand to be in the living room. I hole up in my room and try to block out the noise. When I was younger I tended to twirl my hair around my finger when I was nervous or board, and now I find that i am always fidgitng with my hands. When I am into something I tend to obbsess over it for a while. There are many T.V. shows that I have on DVD, and when I decide I want to watch a show I don’t just watch an episode or two. I will watch the entire series through from beginning to end, and I’ll watch any special features on the DVD’s even if I’ve seen it all before. I will be totally focused on that for several weeks until I am with the series. Often when I find a subject I find interesting, I’ll find myself researching it to the exclusion of other activities. I also have to try not to say what I think to people because they will think I am rude. It has happened many times,and I don’t know why they think I’m being rude because I’m not doing it on purpose. I just like to be direct when I communicate; I do not like small talk and pointless conversation that beats around the bush. I like to get to the point, and I guess most people think that is rude. Anyway, I’m rambling here, but I am thinking about finding a doctor in my area to get a diagnosis. I am going back to college right now and if I do have aspergers then I can get help from the school to help me do better in my classes. Thanks for having the information available for people so they can have a place to start when looking for help.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Catherine
      Thank you for sharing part of your own life experiences.

      Obtaining a formal Diagnosis is definitely an option, especially if you have a reason for wanting or needing a diagnosis. In your situation with returning to college it quite likely could provide you with some additional assistance to help you with your classes. So that sounds like a solid plan.

      Again, I appreciate you sharing. It is interesting reading through the comments and so many times seeing a lot of the same things that I struggle with. 🙂

      I wish you all the very best with finding a doctor, getting a diagnosis and succeeding at college!

      Many Blessings,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  134. madalina

    HI,

    I just made the test on behalf of my husband. It s 39. And my question to you is : how I m going to tell him about that? I just dont find the courage and the way… so please help with an idea. For sure you know better than me.

    thank you.

    Madalina

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Madalina
      Thanks for leaving your question.

      I am honestly now sure what to tell you. It would be good to just sit down with your husband and tell him your concerns. Know that the online test is NOT a diagnosis, but rather a first step and indication of the possibility of Aspergers syndrome or an ASD. So after sharing your concerns and thoughts with your partner then you may want to seek out a formal diagnosis.

      I do hope you work out a way to open up and share with your husband.

      Take care
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Vince

      Hi Madalina. It’s probably too late to answer your question, by now you probably talked to him about it. Just wanted to say that maybe you shouldn’t worry too much. I took the test and scored 39 as well. It’s been a while I’ve suspected myself to have a form of autism, HFA, Asperger’s, whatever. While this doesn’t confirm it, it does add a little weight to my suspicions. I’m in my forties, so oddly enough, I don’t really see a proper diagnosis being much more beneficial than “for the sake of being sure.” As a toddler, sure, as an adult, it’s not like there’s a cure for it.

      But what I wanted to say is maybe you don’t have reasons to worry about telling him. People have a bad perception of autism which is not a condition, but rather a spectrum of conditions. All in all, for an adult, I think, it’s more about learning to know yourself better. And putting a word on a collection of varied behaviors you have that are in a way or another stigmatized by society, but part of a (even hypothetical) condition, can be pretty helpful in the constant process of self-building.

      Plus the test is not a proper diagnosis base. More indicative of the pertinence of further testing. You should have him pass the test himself, actually, his answers might vary from yours a little.

      Reply
  135. Roe

    Hiya, I’m a woman in my 30’s, and up until December 2013 I thought I was “normal”.
    Then one of my doctors sent me to a team to figure out if I have Aspergers..

    The result, after a few months, came back positive, I have Aspergers, I’m a high functional Aspie.
    And the doctors said tat one of the reason it wasn’t detected when I was younger is that I’ve got an extremely high iq and I’m really good at “copying” ppl..

    The thing is, all my life I’ve felt pretty normal, never questioned how I was or how I reacted to certain situations and things, just sort of thought other ppl were weird, and not really caring either, ’cause I wasn’t that interested in ppl and was happy being me doing my things.

    And now I feel sort of low, finding out that where I thought I did good, I suck, and I don’t understand how a high IQ can “hide” a thing like this, or why my family and friends never told me the things they told my doctors, bc if they had, maybe I would have been able to either change or contact a doctor at a much earlier age, and I wouldn’t have felt the way I do now..

    Tomorrow is my last day with the team, and I’m a little scared, ’cause I’m supposed to be a grown up, and I usually hate feelings, but now I feel sad and really need my parents to hug me..

    But I want to thank you for the test, and your tips and stuff, I’ll be sure to stop by again when I’ve sorted all this out 🙂

    -Roe-

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Roe

      I thank you so much for stopping by and sharing your recent journey with us. Opening up about your life and feelings is not always an easy thing to do!

      I hear what you are saying, that this has come as a shock now after all those years of feeling ‘normal’ Let me say that everyone is unique and different. So it really is hard to know what ‘normal’ is. Society, I guess has its own idea of what the average person should be like, but no one really fits into that 100%!

      It has been a few days now since you wrote your comment. How are you feeling now? Please let us know how you are doing. 🙂

      Is there a support group for those with Aspergers in your local area? If so then it would probably be good if you could make contact and go along.

      Diagnosis is just one step. Learning to live and use the skills and strengths that you do have, while at the same time working on some areas of weakness is an on-going process.

      I truly wish you all the very best and do hope to hear back from you soon.

      Please take care and look after yourself. God bless you!

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Roe

      Hiya, Justine
      Thank you for your reply, I’m now done with the team, and I have been given the info on my local Aspies 🙂

      According to my family, you are absolutely right, about how the diagnose is just one step, and that learning to live and use the skills and strengths that I have, so now I’ll be working on the areas I know needs work, and strengthen those.

      They also agree about how the society perceive “normality”, and they say they never said anything to me, bc eventhough I’m a li’l bit different, that’s what make me me apparently 😉

      I feel better now, have had a few days with my family (all 27 of them), and we’ve been talking a lot about everything and nothing.. And some plans for the future’s been laid too 🙂

      So I once again just want to say thank you, and I hope you know that you reach and help a lot of ppl, including me 🙂

      God bless and Keep you.

      -Roe-

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hi Roe
        So lovely to hear from you again! 🙂

        Fantastic to hear too that you are happy with where you are at the moment. That is a great place to begin to move forward and live your life in a happy, complete and fulfilling way. You can even be a blessing to those around you. 🙂

        Please come back here anytime you want and share how you are doing. Life (I have found 🙂 ) never seems to go smoothly 100% of the time. So know that we are here to encourage and support you on the days that may be harder than others.

        Thank you truly for your kind words. My heart is just to be a Blessing to others and to help Empower others to be All they can be in this life!

        May our Precious Lord truly continue to Bless you and your family and to keep you safe in His hands.

        Justine 🙂

        Reply
  136. Liz

    I scored a 28. I took the same type of test 2 times a scored around a 30, so I guess I’m borderline? I knew it had to be more than just being incredibly shy. In the past year or so I’ve gotten better, but every so often I’ll be in certain social situations have no ideal what to do. Generally it makes me want to go somewhere and roll up in a ball. I certainly have a difficult time making friends. If I like someone it’s possible that I’ll be intimidated by them, and that makes me nervous, and I’m sure I send off strange vibes. I generally have no idea what to do socially. Though I value my alone time, I do like people and want to make friends, but it confuses me. I even remember an episode of Arthur (kid’s show yes, I’m 20, lol) where they had a group of kids with Asperger’s and I though “well they kind of talk like I do”. I should mention I usually act more “normal” around people I’m comfortable with (my family, ect) and I have gotten better, but it’s still there.
    Most people end up learning, or instinctively know how to act around other people. Because we’re all humans right? we should know and have the desire to communicate with each other. But some us are missing that I suppose.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Liz 🙂

      True we are all humans with many and varied personalities and characteristics. No two of us are identical, not even ‘identical’ twins. 🙂

      I hear what you are saying, it is often easier to act more ‘normal’ around those you are comfortable with. But I find sometimes it is even difficult to truly relax and be myself around those I love due to my own beliefs of ‘how I should behave or respond’. Not sure if that makes sense or not. 🙂 lol

      It is interesting though listening to others with Aspergers syndrome and seeing little ways that they behave that remind me of myself.

      Thank you for commenting, Liz. Come back anytime and let us know how you are going. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  137. Travis

    I just took the test (stumbled across it). Scored a 35. It seems kinda unlikely, though I’m not known with the symptoms. I’m likely to have Social Anxiety and Sensory Processing Disorder.

    Should I make any assumptions to the score? I know its not a full diagnosis.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Travis

      Thanks for stopping by 🙂

      No! Definitely do not read too much into the score! This can give an indication only of the possibility of having an autism spectrum disorder.

      A formal diagnosis is the only way to be 100% sure.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  138. Bella

    Hi Justine

    Is there an email that I can contact you? I would like to ask a few things, but do not want my partner to come across this site and see my public posts, as it is rather sensitive as you can imagine x

    Reply
    • Mike

      Ok, retaken. 42 out of 50. Higher than I had expected but can’t really argue with it.

      Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Mike
      Thank you for you bringing that problem to my attention. 🙂

      I have had my programmer find the cause of this bug that occurred occasionally and he has gone ahead and fixed it. So it should all be working correctly now.

      Take care and again thank you.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  139. Chrissy

    Hi all!

    I scored 32 and somehow after my stay with a friend (who also has Asperger’s), surfed the internet and came back to the idea I had 10 years ago…

    As a child I only learned to walk at age 2.5 and I had massive difficulties with socializing. I scratched off the wallpaper before going to sleep and found ease while doing this. My mum didn’t as you could imagine. I was a dreamer living in complex constructed fantasy worlds and had my special interests which I could pursue for 8 hours a day without the need for socializing.

    I once asked my mum about why I am so clumsy and had such bad coordination skills and she got upset. I remember that she once called me an autistic person and I didn’t know what it meant… Why did she say this? I never liked girly stuff but only my quite male special interests and when I played with girl’s toys I categorized them into my complex constructs I made for my games. Other children always had to adhere to my rules I gave but some younger ones were happy to do so…

    I have acquired social skills in the meantime and I am not bad at organizing and even leading people up to some extent. I am shy-like but I have overcome it by self-hypnosis for confidence training. This helped me a lot.

    Now, being quite successful except for intimate relationships, my question is if it would be of any use getting a diagnosis. I know that in my country only extreme cases are diagnosed and many physicians are not eager to label well-functioning people with psychological diagnoses.

    Also my parents have not told me but thought it would be better for me to think I am normal and not labelled. However, I always felt so different as from a wrong planet. I felt guilty and strange and suffered a lot, also with anxiety. On the other hand, I didn’t feel as being wrong officially and created my identity as someone special. Now at the age of 36, I found my identity but had very difficult phases up to finding it. I have difficulties in relationships and always asked myself why I seemingly don’t understand other’s feelings and why they turn away or why they act like they do… My friends now suspect this diagnosis, now that it is more known to ordinary people in this country. I don’t know how I would feel when I had a diagnosis as it would be a disability but I am not disabled… I am just different and have a small problem… Don’t know what to do…

    Best wishes,
    Chrissy

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Chrissy 🙂

      Thanks for your detailed comment. I always love reading all of the comments left by visitors to our website. So thank you.

      Diagnosis is not always necessary. As you mentioned, once you do receive a diagnosis then you can be ‘labelled’ and this may not always be helpful. In many cases a diagnosis can help the person to understand why they respond or behave in a certain way. But in other cases, where the person has learned to cope reasonably well without a diagnosis then it may be best to just continue living life.

      Whether you choose to get a diagnosis or not it is important to remember that each of us need to continue to grow and learn during our lives. We can each learn new skills and work on our weaknesses. This in itself can help each of us to be live happier and more fulfilled lives.

      I can not tell you either way to get a diagnosis or not. It needs to be your decision. But whatever you do decide know that there is support available for you. You certainly are not alone!

      God bless you, Chrissy and all the very best for the future. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  140. Kate

    Hi, I’m Kate. Maybe its obvious.My score was 38. I’m 15 and my sister has autism, and I found she and I have many similarities regarding our social interaction, which was the reason I started researching autism. From it I found aspergers syndrome and have found many things that match my personality.

    Since I was 8 I have had a total fixation with a line of games (Final Fantasy) and became kind of obsessed since then and I’ve felt abnormal and pretty much crazy for it. Another obsession I developed was with a character of my own creation in a manuscript I wrote based on an imaginary friend I had during childhood who I created to be like me as I didn’t feel ‘normal’

    Lately in school I have been suffering anxiety. One day when I was sent alone to collect something from another class I hid in an empty room for 45 minutes and started crying because I felt crazy. I’m not really sure how to deal with it and my mum isn’t sure if I actually have some kind of social disorder or if I’m looking for attention similar to what my sister receives.

    All my life I had trouble talking to people but this was put down to the fact I was bullied, but I don’t know if that’s the case. I never quite know what people expect me to say in a situation or when to say it, so I avoid conversations. Many people avoid me because I don’t really care about anything they tell me about parties or their new hair color etc. I dont follow trends and have a color obsession with grey things in general. I have two friends but I always say the same things to them because they once found it funny, the rest of the time I can’t help but talk about my interests, or as other people call them, obsessions. This includes my writing as I seem to care more about the world I created than my world.

    I don’t really care if I do have aspergers but I feel very pressured in school when my teachers force me into talking. I frequently get in trouble for not doing tasks that require social interaction, despite the fact I try but mostly freeze up or run awa. I’m not sure what to do so any advice would be great.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Kate

      Thank you for sharing your heart with us! It is not an easy thing to do, but if you can find a safe place to open up then it is often very helpful. 🙂

      My heart goes out to you! I feel what you are saying about the stress that is caused when you are pressured to talk in front of others. I also remember breaking down at school and being unable to complete my talk that I was meant to do in front of the class. It is hard to deal with and often other students and even teachers do not understand. I was fortunate in that this one teacher allowed me to complete the talk at a later time just in front of her. But even this was not easy to do!

      Can you talk with your parents about your concerns and what you are feeling? This would probably be the best place to start, if it is an option.

      If you can not talk with your parents then is there another trusted adult you can turn to for support and advice? Perhaps a trusted teacher or leader at church or another family relative?

      Perhaps you can go to your family doctor and share what you are going through. If your family doctor is aware of your sister’s autism then they may also be familiar with Aspergers and be able to help you get a diagnosis.

      Please let us know what happens. We truly do want to hear that things are going better for you.

      Take care, Kate and God richly bless you and your family. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  141. Mae

    I got a 38 on the quiz. I’m 18 and I’ve always felt different I’ve never been able to look people in the eyes I hate being around other people all but a few of my friends are younger or much older than me. I suck at conversations so I tend to avoid them and try to just focus on numbers or things that I love like Marilyn Manson everyone says I’m heartless and clumsy and I can’t keep a relationship if my life depended on it as a child I always played pretend even now I still find myself “pretending” things… I was diagnosed with depression,aggression, and anxiety last year and I’m wondering if I have ASD that would explain a lot.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Mae 🙂
      Thank you for opening up and leaving a comment.

      Are you able to go back to the doctor that diagnosed you with anxiety and the other conditions and ask them about Aspergers syndrome? IF they are not that familiar with the ASD then you could ask them to refer you to someone who is.

      It may help you to follow up and seek a formal diagnosis from a professional familiar with Aspergers. So do not give up. Sometimes it just helps to have some clarification as to why we act and respond in the ways we do.

      Please come back and let us know how you get on.

      God bless you
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  142. Katie

    I’ve had a feeling for a while now that something was off. Being in the psychology and neuroscience field, I figured I should probably make sense of my past and present. I’ve always identified with aspies so my score of 47 was not very surprising. Unfortunately, I cannot afford a professional diagnosis. Thanks for sharing Cohen’s test.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Katie 🙂
      47 is quite a high score and definitely indicates the likelihood of aspergers syndrome. Thank you for sharing your test score with us.

      I wish you all the best for the future.
      Take care,
      Justine

      Reply
  143. E

    Hi. I’m 14. I got a 34 on the test.

    -I have empathy problems,
    -I think but have no trouble imagining things (and like fiction),
    -and do not need schedules/routines.
    -I do like to stick by rules rather strictly
    -and I can’t keep a conversation going, start one, or join easily join one,
    -But I can keep a skype conversation going easily.
    -and I can read expressions fairly well.
    -I do understand sarcasm, but it took me quite a long time to learn to analyze expressive tones to -detect it (I cannot use it very well).
    -I do not talk very much in general. I do debate class though and do okay.
    -Sometimes I don’t know why i’m sad.
    -I do well in math, and it is probably the only subject that I don’t detest, other that physics (maybe).
    -I am academically strong
    -I can’t memorize strings and strings of numbers and data
    -Supposedly I’m intelligent like 99% but I don’t think so. My estimate is around 90-95 percentile.

    Sorry for all the bullet points and stuff. But do you know if I have any weird emotional problem? The
    description of 34 made me interested. Is it simply because of my personality type? (INTJ)? Or do I really have some sort of problem?

    Thank you so much,
    E

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi
      Thanks for sharing you thoughts and comment on our asperger’s website. 🙂

      I really am not in a position to give you a diagnosis or aspergers or any other condition. All I can do is offer some suggestions and thoughts from my own experience. Really the only way to determine any underlying issues is to seek out a professional or formal diagnosis.

      People in general vary a lot in characteristics and mannerisms. That being said, if you want a more precise determination of any condition or problem you will need to follow up with a professional that is familiar with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorders)

      Please stop by again and let us know what you have decided to do and how you got on.

      All the best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  144. Miza

    Hi…

    Just took this test and i got 38. Btw, i discovered that i have autism last year when i was seeing the doctor to my son who has adhd & autisme. the doctor told me that she could tell that i have autism during the first session ie counseling for me before taking steps for my son.

    that explained a lot about me why i haven’t got many friends during my childhood, some people called me crazy, weird and even a control freak. i seldom smile and always frozen in front of camera and it takes a lot to make me smile in front of the camera…

    thanks for the test…

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Miza
      Thank you for stopping by and commenting.

      Having the diagnosis helps to give some understanding of why we are as we are. So I am glad for you that you have your diagnosis.

      I truly wish you, your son and family all the very best moving forward.

      God’s blessings,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  145. Doris

    hey, I scored a 41. I’ve always known that there is something wrong with me.I mean I ‘m so terrible at all those social things. I was like an invisible person when I was in high school,but I didn’t care.My major is physics,I’m now at my first year in college and I haven’t made any close friends.It doesn’t really matter but sometimes I just feel a little bit lonely.What should I do?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Doris
      Thank you for sharing your score with us and leaving a comment.

      There is no easy answer to finding out how to fit in with others in social situations and to form close friendships. What I can say is that if you can think of things that you enjoy doing and then see if you can find a group (either in your local area or online) that you can join. Once you gather with others that have similar interests it is often easier to establish friendships around this topic.

      I hope it all works out for you. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  146. Noname

    just like the tests I took at the psychiatrists I don’t really know how to answer the questions and or they don’t apply to me so I cant really answer those without making the test score inaccurate ps.. I got 29 but It probly wasn’t accurate because if I didn’t know the answer I said slightly agree

    Reply
    • Justine

      Thank you for your comment.

      True it is very difficult to get an accurate test result when you find that the questions are not that easy to answer.

      I truly do wish you all the very best.
      Justine

      Reply
  147. Holly

    My 10 year old took the test and got a score of 24. What do I do with that? He was diagnosed with inattentive ADHD last year. I just think there is more to it than that. The way he is, what he does, how he acts, I don’t know what to do. He is a grade or two behind in school, doesn’t look you in the eye, will not hug and doesn’t care to be hugged, digestive problems, obsessed with certain things, can’t tell if someone is bored when he is talking to them, can’t tell what someone is feeling from there facial expressions, has a few friends. I thought he might have a hearing problem when he was 6 months old, he wouldn’t answer when you called his name or turn if you clapped. There are many other things but I just can’t get over that it might be something else other than inattentive ADHD or some learning disabilities. Any ideas?

    Reply
    • Holly

      He is terrified of the dark to the point where he becomes hysterical if the light goes out. Left shoe always goes on first, has to sit in certain chair most times, writes phonetically if you can get him to write. He has been bullied, done self harm a few times, used to put his hands up to his face a lot when you talked to him but doesn’t do it much anymore. Communication is very hard for him, he can’t get out what he is trying to say very well.

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hi Holly
        Thank you for returning.
        It definitely sounds like your son would benefit from a professional diagnosis and follow up support and treatment.

        Please see my other comment and come back to tell us how you go with it all.

        Take care,
        Justine 🙂

        Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Holly
      I appreciate you opening up and sharing about your 10 year old son.

      After reading what you wrote, my first thought is for you to find a doctor in your area that specializes in Autism spectrum disorders and Asperger’s syndrome. A general family doctor may be more familiar with ADHD rather than ASD, but a professional who is familiar with these conditions would be better able to give an accurate diagnosis.

      It does definitely sound like you need to persevere and get a formal diagnosis for your son. It is often not easy, but at least with a diagnosis you can get the assistance that your son needs. This is especially important to do while he is still young.

      I truly wish you all the very best in finding someone who can help you out with a diagnosis and treatment plan.

      Please return and tell us how you get on.

      God’s blessings over you, your son and your entire family. 🙂
      Justine

      Reply
  148. Scarlett

    Hi there,

    My name is Scarlett and I am a 13 year old girl turning 14 this year. My father has Asperges, my brother has Autism and apparently my mum is suspected to have Asperges.
    I decided that since my chance of having Asperges DNA wise is quite high I decided to take this test.
    Bewarn I only took it once and I got the score of 27.
    My mother (who has worked with children who have Autism) tells me I have “Asperges Traits”. I assume thod fact because growing up in a family that had either mild Asperges to Autism.
    What I find is that my mother could be right, like for example: I can socialize very well although I don’t like making new friends. I can give something a go as long as it doesn’t stress me out (I get stressed out very easily and will end up crying if I make a small mistake).

    I felt a need to ask you if these would be normal symptoms for people with Asperges and wouls you recommend me seeing a doctor about it? If so, I might when I am older so the symptoms are more clear and I don’t have high school in the way to stress me out further.

    Can you get back to me, please?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Scarlett 🙂
      Thank you for commenting and sharing about your own family situation.

      Do you think it may be worthwhile talking to the doctor that diagnosed your father or brother? They would probably be a good starting point for a formal diagnosis for yourself and your mother.

      I am not able to give you a diagnosis myself. But I do recommend that you follow it up with your family doctor or the doctor that has treated your brother or dad, as I mentioned above.

      Sometimes additional help is offered in some schools to students who have aspergers syndrome. So this may be something to also keep in mind. You did say that you may want to wait until after high school and that certainly is another option.

      Probably the best thing to do first is to discuss it with your mother and father and see what they think.

      Please feel free to come back and let us know how you get on and what you decide.

      God bless you,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  149. Marie

    Hi, >I am a 37 y women and I scored 36. My son will undergo evaluation because the school psychologist thinks he might have ASD.

    My whole life, i’ve felt different. I am clueless in social situations. I have been previously diagnosed with bipolar disorder type 2. Then that dx what removed and I got dx with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    But ASD makes so much sense to me! I read Attwoods book and he is basically describing my teenage years.

    I am now on a work leave, and I wonder if I should be officialley diagnosed. My husband and my mom think I’m nuts to think I could be an aspie. They say taht I’m weird and lack empathy but that’s no reason for thinking about ASD. My doctor doesn’t think I fit the profile, she still sees me as a bipolar since she’s the one who made the dx over 10 years ago (althought I havent had any clear hypomania in my life and am off medication for the past 6 years with no change to my affect).

    I tried other tests, like the Faux pas Test and I scored very high, I made a faux pas just the other day, I met the school principal and when I told her my firstname, she said she had given her daughter the same firstname. i went on telling her how I hated my name and was in the process of changing it. i only realized I could’ve hurt her feelings after the meeting was over. Typically me.

    Thanks

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Marie
      Glad you stopped by and left us a comment. Thank you. 🙂

      It is a tricky one with getting a diagnosis. Do you think you may be able to speak to the school psychologist and ask if they could recommend someone you could go to for a diagnosis? Ideally you need to go to someone who is familiar with Asperger’s syndrome.

      All the best with your son’s diagnosis and your own.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Lindsay

      I, too, have been diagnosed with BD II and BPD with some Avoidant Personality Disorder. I also identify with the aspie traits that I have seen on the aspie groups I follow on facebook. I’ve found it interesting to say the least.

      The only hang up I have is that I’m also an HSP (highly sensitive person) and an empath. An empath can feel what EVERYONE is feeling around them all at once and it can get quite overwhelming. SO, a lot of my social cues were learned from my empathic abilities. I still don’t read faces very well, but when I notice a change in expression I can tap in and check on their energy state and quickly ascertain what they’re feeling. I’m also a bit clairvoyant, so some social cues are taken from that. For instance, I can tell what subject a person is very sensitive about and avoid that subject even to the point of redirecting the conversation when others decide to talk about it in order to protect them from discomfort. When I’m tired or overwhelmed, this all goes out the window. But, the duality seems odd when looking at the clinical traits, but when speaking to other aspies, empath abilities and aspergers are NOT mutually exclusive.

      I’m also very talkative. Very.

      My AQ score is 38 – 41. I’ve taken it a couple times to be sure I am not kidding myself or I am understanding the questions right (more of that obsessive thinking).

      Anyhow, I concur with your post. And it feels good to not be the only one misdiagnosed with the wrong disorders.

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hey Lindsay 🙂
        Thanks for stopping by and taking the time to comment and leave your thoughts.

        Being misdiagnosed certainly can make things seem more confusing. I think that many doctors and professionals become familiar with certain conditions and so it is easier for them to put patients under these ‘headings’ rather than to give a diagnosis for a condition that they are not that familiar with. 🙂

        I would say that it is probably best to seek out a doctor who knows about Aspergers syndrome and understands the full formal diagnosis procedure for ASD.

        Take care and some back anytime.
        Justine 🙂

        Reply
  150. Erik

    Hi, I just turn 46 years old. I scored a 30 the first time then I took it again & I got a 34. I had trouble my whole life. Couldn’t speak until I was 5 years old thanks to a speech teacher & watching a lots of TV. Now I’m hooked on Entertainment for years, but I don’t know how to be that social unless I force myself which is very hard. I just got transferred to a new department after 21 years of work, then I was fired after two years. The new bosses didn’t like the way I speak or email & phone conversations with employees I was helping plus they claim I was making too many mistakes. It’s very hard too learn new things. I also have some type of seizures for over 35 years that no doctor can figure what causes this issue cuz MRIs & EEGs are normal. There’s a lot more stuff in my life that could also be asperger’s. Sometimes I feel like ending it all, especially now after I lost my Mother (I’m a Momma’s boy). Please tell what do you think. Thanks.

    P.S. My wife can’t deal with me sometimes either with my mistakes of verbal or clumsiness.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Erik
      I truly appreciate you leaving your comment and sharing a little of your struggles with us. 🙂

      I fully hear what you are saying about the hardships that you have (and still are having) in regards to work and relating to others. It is certainly not easy sometimes! 🙁 So sorry to hear that you were put off from your job. That is really difficult!

      Sorry too to hear of the loss of your mother! (I recently had a death in my own family, my younger brother, and so I can relate a little to what you are feeling 🙁 ) Sometimes it is easy to feel like giving up on everything, but you do have people in your life who love you and would be devastated if that were to happen!

      Is there someone you trust that you can sit and talk with and open up to about how you are feeling? Perhaps a trusted family member? Or could you possibly talk to someone in a local church or community counseling center?

      It really can help having a trusted, safe place where you can bear your burden!

      I am praying for you, Erik and hope to hear back soon how you are doing!

      Take care and God bless you richly in the midst of all the struggles!
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  151. deb

    Scored 29, never been diagnosed, but have always thought it’d make good sense of a lot of things if I was.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Deb
      Thanks for commenting on our website.

      A diagnosis is not always necessary, but I do agree that it often helps to explain and clarify things. 🙂

      Take care.
      Justine

      Reply
  152. Shannon

    Hi, I took this test really quickly without really thinking about my answers at uni the other day and scored 31. I retook it, properly this time, and scored 33. I only really thought about it because the university suggested a group of us might have an LD or aspergers. I’m not sure if i should get a proper screening through university. I’m 18 years old and would really appreciate any advice.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Shannon 🙂

      Thanks for stopping by, checking out our website and leaving a comment.

      If you have the opportunity to be screened through university then it may well be worth your while to do that. Do you know if the University offers any help or assistance to students that do have learning disorders or Aspergers or ASD? If so then it could really help you out to know.

      Also if it is something that is bothering you personally and you are wondering about it then it could not hurt to go for a formal diagnosis.
      Let us know how you get on.

      God Bless you.
      Justine 😀

      Reply
  153. Charlie

    I took the test twice and got a 31 both times…hmm. On the TV show Parenthood and adult character read a book on Aspbergers and then thought he might be. I wondered and took the test. So I’m not quite sure what it means. I’m 62 years old.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Charlie 🙂
      Thanks for leaving your comment.

      The AQ test score that you got both times is on the high end of the ‘borderline’ range. This gives an indication that you could possibly have Aspergers syndrome.

      It is important to keep in mind that due to your age you have probably learned to behave and act in certain ways to better fit in with society. So hence the score could have been quite different if you were to have done it, say 20 years ago!

      As long as you are coping well and feel ok about yourself and how you react etc then there is probably no reason to pursue a formal diagnosis.

      I wish you all the best,
      Justine 😀

      Reply
  154. Kim

    Hey.

    I’ve actually never told anyone about this, though my family and school personel has probably noticed. I have big problems communicating with others my age (16) primarily because I use words they don’t.

    I always keep a rutine for everything I do. even if it is something as simple as walking our dog, or just going for a walk. I use the same path everytime, and I get irritated if my path is obstructed by anything, someone working on the road, or if I see other humans walking along the path I wanted to walk. If this is the case, I stop, try to hid, just so I don’t need to meet people.

    I’d rather sit by myself than with others, and I hate taking part in conversations.

    When I were younger, I had an obssession with collecting weird looking sticks and stones. This obssession has now been replaced with an urge to collect movie posters and music.

    My test score was 76 by the way.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Kim
      Lovely to hear from you. Thank you for sharing. 🙂

      In regards to your test score I have no idea how you got 76. Did you take the test using Test Option 1 or Option 2?

      Both options should give the same results for sure, but I would be interested to see if you do the test again using the other option if you do get this same result.

      Please can you let me know what you find when you re-do the AQ test?

      Thank you again. I await your reply.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
      • Kim

        Hello.

        I did test option 1. I re-did it and I got a score of 42 this time.

        Thank you for replying so quickly.

        -Kim

        Reply
        • Justine

          Hi Kim 🙂
          Thank you for redoing the test and sharing your score with us.

          All the very best for the future 🙂

          Justine

          Reply
  155. Shana

    I scored a 40.. I was dx with adhd when I was little but I wasn’t hyper. I would do repetitive behaviours such when ever at school I would constantly and please don’t make fun but constantly picked my nose and it only picked up at school and at recess instead of playing with other kids I would rather sit in a rock pile every school day just to collect a certain type of rock and I would even do this outside of school.. I have a really bad obsession with my piano and my iPhone and anything to do with music songs and movies an characters in a movie. I also get very anxious in new situations but I’m able to push past the anxiety if it’s really important other then that I usually just avoid things.. I was never taught how to play the piano or read sheet music but I can make up my own songs that sound like I was meant to play piano.. I’m constantly in my iPhone checking weather and news. I’m still very terrified of wind and thunderstorms and sometimes always usually start crying whenever we have a thunderstorm. In sorry for the list of things but I had to question this because I’m married and a mom to three children one who has possible mild aspergers and is getting evaluated this month and I’m wondering if I should be to just to make since of things.. And maybe get a better understanding to why my son has been the way he is

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Shana
      Thank you for opening up and sharing some of your struggles and life with us. 🙂

      If your son is being assessed at the moment, then it may be a good idea to discuss your concerns about your own situation with those doing the evaluation. It may be that they can also evaluate you and give you a diagnosis after they complete the work on your son. Even if you decide not to go ahead with a full formal diagnosis for yourself, this additional information could assist those who want to help your son.

      I hope it all works out well for you and your family and hope to hear from you again.

      God bless you,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  156. johnny

    I recently exchanged some dialogue with Brant Hansen, from Air 1 radio. He suggested I look into AS by taking some tests. My score is 26, borderline. I’m also nearly 50 though, have a BS degree and have over the years worked to overcome social awkwardness by taking public speaking, be more assertive and so on. Also some of the questions can be a little open, for example: “I enjoy social occasions.” I like to go out and see and do things and I don’t mind if there are a lot of people if there are things to look at, I’m OK but if there are only people to interact with I feel pretty isolated. I can engage in very superficial chit chat for a short time but never seem to be able to engage in deeper conversation. I usually feel pretty awkward and it seems that the manner in which I say things often does not come out right. I also feel rather numb emotionally, especially when it comes to humor or being excited about things. On the other hand, I can be very sensitive and moved to tears easily.
    Did I understand correctly that with autism there are actually physical differences within the brain than that of someone without autism? Is this also the case with spectrum disorders, such as Aspergers?

    Thanks for hosting this information,
    johnny

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Johnny
      Great to hear from you. Thanks for sharing. 🙂

      It is impossible to diagnose Aspergers from an AQ test score, regardless of how high the score may be! The aim of these tests is just to give an indication and a starting point… Your score (26) is at the low end of the ‘borderline’ scores so this does not really give any clear indication either way.

      If it is bothering you then a formal diagnosis is the best path to take.

      Here is an interesting short article on brain anatomy: http://www.futurity.org/brain-structure-may-reveal-learning-disorder/

      Thanks again for commenting
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  157. Zechariah

    Just posted a 45 on this test. Found out about Asperger’s about 4 months ago and it explains the vast majority of problems that I have had over a lifetime (now 66). I plan to pursue a full diagnosis in that it will allow me to forgive myself and my past. Not interested in any behavioral modification at my age since I am successfully retired from three technical careers, all rooted in math and engineering. I suppose my plan is to be myself without having to expend all this energy (throughout my lifetime) trying to act a part on a stage and play I wasn’t interested in. Just don’t have the coping energy anymore. Time for God’s peace!

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Zechariah

      Thank you for sharing your test result and your desire for a formal diagnosis. I too found it helped me to better understand myself and why I acted as I did over the years.

      I hope that you are able to find peace with who you are and to enjoy living the rest of your life.

      God’s Peace be upon you.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  158. Amelia

    Hi, I scored a 36 and I’ve been pretty sure I have aspergers or something for a while now. I’m 14 years old. I’ve always found social situations very difficult and I’m (apparently) a very nice person but I’m very anxious and can’t talk to people who aren’t very encouraging and friendly. I had to teach myself how to look people in the eye when I was about nine and I have some form of selective mutism (I think) cause I find it very difficult to speak to strangers and when I try nothing comes out.

    I have a lot of social anxiety and I come home from school every day and I obsess over every little thing I’ve heard and get really worked up about it. It’s really affecting me at the moment as I have been losing friends over the last while. I’m becoming very engrossed with drawing and reading and playing piano. I am very nature oriented but that’s nearly an obsession now and it’s the only place I’m happy, when I’m in the woods. In fact when I’m with groups of people who are also very attached to nature all my usual anxiety goes away. But all my friends say I obsess over nature and I tend to become very enamored with a subject if I get into it. I think that people think I am rude but I just find it impossible to strike up a conversation. I also find it very hard to approach people and groups, but it really annoys me and I try really hard but I always end up panicking.

    I’m a really dedicated and fast learner, but if I’m not interested in something I go into a mode in which nothing can go into my brain. I play lots of instruments (piano, cello, ukulele, viol, guitar and bass guitar) and I can sing melodies I hear once and improvise over things and I can harmonize with tunes I’ve never even heard before. I’m very tuned into music and simply a chord change can make me burst into tears if it’s good. I tend to get so involved with music that I will sit in my room and cry for an hour to my favorite bands new song (not from sadness, from the beauty). When it comes to homework though I can’t actually function and I can’t do work unless it’s in a set timeframe, so I get really stressed and sit there trying to do my homework for hours, almost every night this happens, so I never get a chance to play instruments or do anything that calms me down.
    I love art and I am currently doing a lot of carving wood. It is very meditative and it calms me down a lot, even the slow pain of blisters from the knife after hours of sitting there in peace.

    When I was a child I was homeschooled, and so I never noticed how hard it was to communicate because I had one friend who I got on well with. However when he moved out of the country I tried to make friends with other people and however much I tried I couldn’t seem to be friendly. I then went to school last year and it was better at first but frankly, this year it’s got a lot worse.

    I’m not a sad or anxious person when I’m on my school holidays though. I’m okay with my family but I tend to pick up on people’s feelings so much that I feel them myself. If someone is sad that I’m close to, I get really upset. I can’t be happy when others aren’t happy, and I’ll go out of my way to make others happy.

    I don’t know what to do cause my parents think I’m really sociable and I’m scared of bringing up the subject and asking if I can go to someone and get tested. But then I don’t know, if I knew I had some form of autism would that affect me more. I’m really trying hard to be more friendly with people and I don’t know whether or not it would benefit me to get tested. Would the school be more helpful to me in schoolwork and more understanding of my needs if they knew? I’m just not too sure right now. Sorry for the long comment.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Thanks so much Amelia for your comment and opening up and sharing your life with us. 🙂

      It is difficult to know how to answer your question regarding being tested for Aspergers or ASD. Many people have indeed found it helpful to understand why they respond and behave differently from others. So it could also benefit you to know for sure.

      Also, depending on where you live and go to school there may be additional assistance available if you were to be diagnosed with ASD. So that is something to keep in mind and look into.

      When it comes to parents it is also difficult to know how to approach the situation. But I believe that honesty is the best policy. Try to approach your parents when they have some time to sit down and listen to you. Then just open up and share what your concerns are. It may not be easy, but your parents love you and want the best for you. Tell them that you are wondering if you should be tested formally or not. See what they say.

      I truly do wish you all the very best and hope to hear from you again in the future.

      Take care,
      Justine 😀

      Reply
  159. Anonymous

    I would say that I am mature and very talkative with adults and family members, but am pretty much the opposite when it comes to other people my age(15-6 yrs old). I am almost always alone on weekends, I have an obsession with consumer electronics/products, and constantly think about the past and never the future. Additionally, I am somewhat of an existential nihilist, quite negative and cynical and hate superfluous, sensationalistic events like prom, Homecoming, New Years Party etc. I excel in school and in extracurriculars but got a 25 on the AQ. Am I simply a shy introvert or should I seek medical help?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi 🙂

      Thank you for leaving your comment.

      Your score of 25 is not overly high and so you be a shy introvert as you mentioned. But what I would say is that if you are concerned with not fitting in or behaving differently from others around you then it definitely may be a good idea to talk to your family and family doctor about your concerns. You may find that there is no special condition, but that you are just a unique person (as we all are 😀 ).

      On the other hand your doctor may pick up something that will help you better understand yourself and why you see the world as you do.

      It certainly could not hurt seeking out a formal diagnosis or doing further research.

      All the best for 2014 and please come back and share how you get on.

      Justine 😀

      Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Kasper

      There really is no way that you could get a score of 73.

      Please do the test again and let us know how you get on.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  160. Natalie

    Hi, I scored a 38 but I am not sure what to think. I am very good at recognizing facial expressions but strugle with social skills. Do you think I am just socially awkward? But then again, it bothers me when things change and I have sensitive hearing. And i flick my fingers and wrists repetitivley. But that xould be because I play piano. When I was younger, I had selective mutism, and I still hate talking to my teachers and ordeeing food. Sorry about the grocery list. Just needed to get it out.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Natalie 🙂

      Thank you for sharing a little of your own struggles.

      It really is impossible for me to sit back here online and give you a diagnosis at all. But what I can hear from what you shared is that you are feeling concerned about how you relate to others and other things that you are struggling with.

      Since it is a concern to you, I would recommend that you do seek out a formal diagnosis. At least then you will have a starting point from which you can move forward.

      If you can understand why you feel and act in certain ways then it will most likely help you feel more comfortable with who you are as a person.

      I hope you will come back and let us know how you get on.

      Take care and Happy New Year!

      Justine 😀

      Reply
  161. Taylor

    Hi,

    My name is Taylor and I had a score of 38. I’ve always found it difficult to relate to people’s jokes. Sometimes I get them, but most of the time I don’t like trying to. Small talk is annoying to me. If you want to talk to me, just do it. I know that I’m not popular, and I know people don’t like me. I accept that. Please don’t think I’m not intelligent. I have a degree in Cyber Security, and people still think I’m nuts. It’s very hard to deal with life daily. Everyone else is married in my family except me. Everyone else has kids in their family of my siblings except me. I feel alone, depressed, no self-esteem, and I’ve been suicidal off and on throughout my whole life. I hate who I am, yet, I like who I am too. It’s a weird feeling. People annoy me to no end. Their favorite question is “How are you doing?” I can’t stand that crap. It’s so superficial knowing they have as much problems as you do regardless of whether they have Asperger’s or not.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Taylor

      I am glad you left your comment and shared a little of your struggles with us.

      I can relate and my heart goes out to you! It really is difficult feeling like you don’t fit in and feeling ‘different’ from others around you! There is no simple answer that I can give you. I too struggle with feeling the odd one out, even with family.

      What I can say is that I hope you can accept who you are and focus on the positives in your life. 🙂

      We truly wish you all the very best and hope to hear from you again in the future.

      God bless you and Happy New Year!

      Justine 😀

      Reply
  162. Michaela Mason

    43. Hm. I’ve always known that I was a bit different — I was diagnosed with depression at age 14, possible Bipolar II at age 17, and Borderline Personality Disorder at age 18. I’m 19 now, and I had noticed for a while that my medications and compulsory therapy doesn’t seem to be working (I’ve been on 6 different meds and had 3 different therapists/counselors).
    Maybe I’ve been treated for the wrong things and that’s why I’m not seeing any results.
    I just believed that my odd social behavior was due only to BPD; after researching Asperger’s, I see that my personality sounds incredibly Aspie-esque. Monotonous voice, single-minded obsession, frequent zoning-out occurrences, an almost complete lack of social skills, vivid imagination, anxiety and depression cycles (which would explain the Bipolar diagnosis), et cetera. Wow. I’m a bit nervous.
    Should I talk to my therapist and psychiatrist about my suspicions? What if they don’t believe me? Other people are so…meh. I wish I could curl up in my bedroom with my sketchbook and mountain of books and never emerge again.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Michaela

      Thank you so very much for sharing your heart with us! 🙂

      I hear what you say about curling up in your bedroom and never emerging again! I have felt that way too!

      From what you have shared, it does sound like it would be a great idea to talk about this with your therapist. Express your concern that perhaps you may have been misdiagnosed. If your therapist does not seem to understand or know about Aspergers then ask them if they could refer you to another professional who is familiar with ASD.

      It certainly would be a good idea to find out soon rather than later if Asperger’s syndrome is a part of the equation in your life.

      Please feel free to come back and leave further comments anytime.

      Take care and God Bless you!

      Justine 😀

      Reply
  163. Sam

    I got a score of 40. A friend who has AS suggested to me a while ago that I might be. Am a little apprehensive about visiting my doctor and telling them I suspect this though. I basically don’t want to be laughed out of the docs office. Any suggestions?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Sam

      Thanks for leaving your comment and sharing your apprehension. 🙂

      I can fully understand what you are saying about feeling nervous going to your doctor and wondering if they will understand or just laugh it off.

      Since you have a friend with aspergers perhaps a good way to move forward would be to go with your friend to a local support group for those with ASD. While at the group you should be able to get some ideas on the best place to go to get a professional/formal diagnosis.

      Please let us know how you get on. We always love to read the comments left on our website.

      Take care,

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  164. Charlie

    Hi. i have taken a few tests and all of them suggested that i have aspergers and since about a year ago (im 17 now) my mum made me take a test and said that i may have this social disorder after i hated interacting with my cousin. I took this test today and scored 39 but i am really confused as i certainly have symptons of the disorder. i freak out in social situations but only specific ones it seems i once had a mental breakdown at a wedding lost complete control and ended up sobbing in a corner however this has not happened since but i have always felt out of sync with other people since they would always go to parties and somehow go outside and attend social situations however i could never understand why i did not want to do this also. Now i have been to a few parties and have been able to manage and have not had a mental breakdown since. I am strongly attached to my Laptop and feel more attached to it then i am to people and i love computers i think they are amazing not having any flaws that humans do they dont get sad or tired and they respond to which ever task you set them out to do and this is probably why i got into computing and am currently doing cisco CCNA course alongside a cambridge technical diploma.

    I lack any empathy at all and have laughed in inappropriate situations (once when someone told me there grandad died) which is horrible i know but i just laughed.I usually only have friends until i no longer require them if that makes sense. like for example i did have a friend however now that i dont see them i dont talk to them or contact them at all. However my main issue is i am really confused on whether i have it or not i am aware from two of my friends that i am a little weird and can talk for ages about my interest but dont usually let anyone else talk and have some weird ideas about death and such (wont go into them they are a little weird) but should i get diagnosed or am i making these symptoms up because sometimes i feel i really do have the disorder then other times i feel its just me in a weird mood.

    Sorry for the comment being so long did not realize it would be.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Charlie

      Thanks so much for opening up and sharing your own experiences with us on the website. Your comments were not too long by the way! 🙂 It is always great reading what people share with us.

      A formal diagnosis is not always necessary, but is often helpful to better understand why we feel and behave in certain ways. I know that singer Susan Boyle has said that being diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome has really helped her to feel better about who she is and how she relates to others.

      From what you have shared it definitely sounds as if you are struggling in certain areas and a diagnosis may help you to understand why you respond as you do.

      Do you have a family doctor that you can go to and share your concerns with? You can tell them that you want to get a professional diagnosis and see if they can help you directly or refer you to someone who can assist. This would be a good place to start.

      I look forward to hearing back from you, Charlie to see how you are getting on.

      God Bless you and Happy New Year!

      Justine 😀

      Reply
  165. Will

    Wow I scored 43… my wife suggested to me that I may suffer from Aspergers as she knows someone who recently was diagnosed, and she thought that I too show many of the signs. I have taken a couple of other online tests which have also shown a strong likelihood of ASD. It has been tearing me apart to be honest and I’m not sure why! I have always known that I am “different”; in preschool it was like I was allergic to other children, when my mum took me to eg a cafe I couldn’t drink in front of other people, I have never understood other people and much prefer to avoid them if possible as I don’t trust them, I stutter when stressed and push at my eyes, I constantly have either 1-2-3-4 or a short rhythm beating in my head, I have superhuman senses of hearing and smell too!, I can switch off my emotions and actually laugh when something is sad, I cant make friends ETC… But I actually get on fine in every day life, which is why at 32 years old I just get on with it. Now I strongly suspect that I have Aspergers I can think of noting else and keep crying (something I hardly ever do!!) 🙁 The trouble is, is there any point in seeking a formal diagnosis? I suppose if I were diagnosed I might start to understand my weirdness?! I’m not sure how I would approach the subject with a doctor.. Can anyone help?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Will

      Thank you for sharing about yourself and your own experiences with us. 🙂

      I read recently how singer Susan Boyle has gained more confidence in who she is since she was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome.

      In answer to your question, it is not always necessary to get a formal diagnosis. But in many cases it does help to answer the internal question of ‘why am I different?’

      My first suggestion would be to discuss your test results and your thoughts and feelings on this whole subject with your wife. It sounds like she is already being supportive and I am sure she would appreciate you opening up to her.

      After that, the next step may be going to your family doctor. You can begin by sharing how you have felt different much of your life and after doing some online AQ tests you would like to discuss if it is worthwhile pursuing a professional diagnosis. Your doctor should then be able to either test you directly or to point you in the right direction to someone who can help.

      I wish you all the very best in whatever path you decide to take in regards to your own situation. Please come back and share how you get on.

      Many Blessings,
      Justine 😀

      Reply
      • Will

        Thanks very much for your advice and words of support, Justine. My wife does think I should seek formal diagnosis from our family doctor, but in the UK (where I live) the health service (NHS) does not have a great track record in this area (so I have heard)… I will think about it over the festive period!

        You are right, Susan Boyle has been diagnosed recently and I’m so pleased she is now feeling more confident as a result, as presumably she is now understanding more about herself as she receives help and support.

        By the way your website is excellent – I have enjoyed reading about others’ experiences and your advice too, and can relate to many.

        Thanks again and I will update if/when I decide what to do! 🙂

        Cheers,
        Will

        Reply
        • Justine

          Hi Will

          I have been away with family over the holiday season, but am back online now 🙂

          Thank you for your kind words regarding our website. We appreciate your support and input.

          As you say, it may be tricky to find a doctor or professional in your area who can give you a diagnosis. I do hope that your family doctor will either be able to help you directly or to point you in the right direction.

          Another good place to start is to search for Aspie support groups in your area. They certainly should be able to give you some pointers as to who can assist with a diagnosis.

          Thank you again and Happy New Year!

          Justine 😀

          Reply
  166. Stephen J. Ittershagen

    38 score… Well, that explains a lot of wierd social shit in my life. Think I’ll definately have this checked out!

    Reply
    • Justine

      Good on you, Stephen.

      I wish you all very best with following up on your score…

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  167. Mollie

    Hi Justine and the Aspies community,
    Thank you all so much for sharing your experiences.

    After 48 years of feeling misunderstood, being the outsider, struggling to maintain friendships, being socially awkward, having numerous obsessions (the list goes on and on…:-)) I’m finally taking steps towards an official diagnosis and it’s hard work.

    When dealing with therapists, I’ve tried to be very clear and concise in both my explanations of where my headspace is at and my requests for tools to help me function better. Despite this, I’ve had two psychologists who have been incredibly dismissive (“oh but you seem so nice – there’s nothing wrong with you”) and a third who is insistent that I undertake EMDR therapy to treat what she perceives as my trauma despite me being very clear in telling her I am not comfortable with this. (and this is a psychologist who has a young son with Aspergers!). Needless to say, I’ve just made an appointment to see therapist number 4. While it’s frustrating, I’m not giving up :-).

    Has anyone else had similar experiernces?

    Another thing I’ve noticed browsing the web, is how many aspies (myself included) are survivors of childhood abuse. Anyone else noticed this?

    Great forum….

    Cheers

    Mollie

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Mollie 😀

      Thanks heaps for your positive feedback and for sharing about your own struggles!

      Reading what you wrote is like looking in the mirror for me! Funny hey! I truly appreciate you opening up like that.

      It is so frustrating finding a professional or therapist who is able to actually listen to what is being said and to provide positive and useful feedback! I truly feel your frustrations!

      Good on you for persisting! There are professionals out there who can help! It is just a matter of finding them. 🙂

      I honestly have never made the connection with abuse. But that is something interesting to consider. I am a survivor of abuse too, but in my case the abuse was mainly emotional and it instilled a great deal of fear in me… So interesting point.

      Thank you again Mollie for sharing with us. Come back and share again anytime you want to.

      Many Blessings,
      Justine 😀

      Reply
  168. Takumi

    Hi I’m a Japanese 16 year old who got a 34. Everyone around me has called me “weird”, and in some cases, rude, as long as I can remember-which I never thought about twice till learning about Aspergers. I’ve adapted somewhat to social situations and have a number of very close friends now, but still feel awkward at times. I also flex(?) my fingers a lot and am an awful klutz, and all this makes me think I have a high possibility of being an Aspie. I want to get an official diagnosis but have no idea which facility to turn to for a reliable one. Personally, I don’t care whether I do have it or not; I’m just curious.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Takumi

      Thank you for your comments and opening up a little about your life experiences with others. 🙂

      It certainly is difficult when you feel that you do not fit in with others around you. I can definitely relate to what you have said.

      My personal opinion is that it is best if you can find a local doctor or professional in your area who you can go to for a diagnosis. Can you go see your family doctor and explain your concerns to them? This would be the first place that I would suggest that you start.

      Please feel free to come back here and comment to let us know how you get on.

      Many Blessings,
      Justine 😀

      Reply
  169. William

    My score was a 30 which it said that I have Asperger’s. I was diagnosed at the age of 16, which is very late and also that same year I was diagnosed as being Bipolar. My primary diagnosis is Bipolar Disorder, which on the Axis I scale. I think that’s my secondary axis.I actually feel like as being Asperger’s. I was physically abused when I was two years old, and I had the grand mal sezure at two and half, which lasted for about six years. Around the same time I was diagnosed with both, I was in the State of Tennessee’s custody.I see myself as a Computer Scientist or a Computer Engineer.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey William

      Thank you for sharing about your life and experiences.

      I wish you all the very best moving forward with your life! 🙂

      Justine

      Reply
  170. Jackson

    Hi, my name is Jackson and I got a 38 on the test. Throughout my whole life, I have had trouble making friends. My Dad used to always yell at me after meeting new people because he said I need to look people in the eye. I have been researching Aspergers after learning about it in school because it seems to be an explanation for my unordinary behaviors. I have always loved looking at the weather, every day I check the forecasts of many different places. Also, math has always been one of my best subjects. I do have OCD. I can remember being a kid at recess, I had no friends, so I used to go back behind the large bushes and hide. The reason I have decided to comment is because I just moved, and I am feeling more lonely than ever before. I am also very depressed. I feel like I have Aspergers, I know I do, but I feel too embarrassed to tell my parents. Life just sucks being so socially awkward. Do you think I could have Aspergers, and more importantly, how should I tell my parents I need help? Thank you. 🙂

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Jackson 🙂

      So sorry for my delay in replying to you! I have been away helping out my mother and have been offline for the last couple of weeks. I am back here now and am happy to read your comments.

      I truly feel what you have shared! I struggled too at school with no friends. It is a real challenge sometimes!

      In regards to telling your parents there is no easy answer. But can I ask you is there a trusted person, family member or a teacher or counselor at your school that you can open up to with your concerns?

      I believe that it is really important for you to find someone you can open up to there where you live who can then help you in going to talk to your parents. This may not be easy, but it is important to do it sooner rather than later.

      Personally, I find it easier sometimes to put things that I find difficult, but it is truly important that you make a decision now to find support and let your family know of your concerns. If you do not feel that you can go directly to your family and tell them what you are feeling and experiencing then look around you for someone you do trust. Open up to this person and ask them to assist you in going to your parents and telling them what is going on in your life. Perhaps your family doctor may be a possible starting point.

      Please come back and let me know how you get on with all of this and sharing with your parents.

      All the very best Jackson.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  171. Blandine

    Hi everyone,

    I am 25 and I definitely have Asperger’s ; I took several tests and always had very high scores, but I knew it before even taking tests. I always prefer to be on my own. it is very difficult for me to understand people talking to me, or any audio emission, although I can read any book in French, German, English or Latin and understand perfectly. An ad showing a person will not retain my attention, whereas one with symbols or icons on it, will stay stuck in my head. I am very bad at making speeches and it makes me very self-conscious, but I am excellent at writing them. Also it took me years to learn how to smile, when to frown, how to look interested, and I achieved this by trying and looking at myself in the mirror everyday (I still have to practice daily).
    Also I am unable to consider myself, or Life, as a “real” thing. It’s like I live in a video game. I am interested in what happens to me, but it’s like it’s not really me, just some character I like.

    Sometimes it is very difficult. Over the years I learnt to look normal by copying my best friend who is the most social, spontaneous and adorable person I know.
    I can’t seek medical advice : I am French, I live in France and here no one knows or cares about Asperger’s. If I tell doctors I think I have it, they ask me what it is, then laugh at me because I don’t “look” autistic at all, I have a job, responsibilities. They think I make it all up.
    Please help me. Is there any online doctor ?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Blandine

      So sorry for the delay. I have been away helping out my mother and have been offline for a couple of weeks. I am back now and am glad to hear from you. 🙂

      I hear what you are saying about finding it really difficult to fit in and act like others around you! I agree it is hard a lot of the time!

      You have asked a good question about an online doctor who can help you out. At this point in time, I am not aware of anyone specific. I will do some research and see if I can find anything online that can be a help.

      In the meantime, if anyone else is reading this and has any ideas then please can you leave a reply comment and let us know?

      Keep doing what you are doing Blandine and continue seeking support and answers.

      Many Blessings,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  172. Chris

    Score: 44. Age: 51. Have just spent three hours writing you a very long and candid personal history, but left spaces between the first and second, and third and fourth characters in the CAPTCHA code – as shown – and lost the lot. Ironic, really, given that this is supposed to be a website that offers support to people with Asperger’s.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Chris

      So sorry to hear that you had problems submitting your comment! 🙁
      I appreciate your feedback. 🙂

      Unfortunately the CAPTCHA is required. I have tried not having one, but receive literally hundreds of automated responses from internet robots! A sad fact online these days.

      Anyway, thanks heaps for checking out our website. I do hope that you will come back and give us another try.

      All the very best
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  173. Kay

    Hi Justine:
    I have only recently heard of aspergers, but since I have learned of it, I have been wondering if I was borderline. (I am a 53 year old female) I always knew that I was different and even sort of backwards, but i thought it was the way I was raised. As a baby, my mother told me I didn’t seem to like attention, I would reach for my walker or highchair when anyone picked me up (I would rather be in my walker than held). as a preschooler, i can remember often feeling left out and not knowing how to fit in when around other children. In school, I had difficulty fitting in, I would be the one who was not chosen to play on a team, in PE. I hated school, I would rather stay home and entertain myself than be around people. I could entertain myself for hours at a time living in a make believe world. There is no way to tell you everything, but change for me has always been a process. I hold down a job, but I would rather not have to work, not that I mind the work, I just don’t like to be around people. I tend to not be accepted, people like me to a point, but I tend to not be included in things and sometimes people in new situations will just decide they don’t like me and I don’t even know why. I have learned to govern myself and try to behave normally. I try not to monopolize conversations and make them all about me, etc. I try to dress appropriately. I try to hide my disorganization, etc. The hardest part of all this, both as a child and as an adult is feeling isolated. thanks for listening.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Kay 🙂

      Thank you for sharing about your life.
      I really can relate to much of what you have said! I actually had many of the same experiences as well!

      It really is difficult being around others for me too! Some days I just wish I could stay home and not have to face ‘everyone’ out there.

      Anyway, thanks heaps for sharing and feel free to comment again on this or any other post on my website.

      Take care and look after yourself!

      Justine 😀

      Reply
  174. grumpysteve

    I’ve taken a few of these tests now, and generally they say I’m border line. this test gave me a score of 24, however another test with the same questions (i answered them differently) gave me a 32. I can’t work out which I was more honest about the answers with, as my opinions of myself differ depending on my mood. I’ve always been unsociable, but always put that down to having a lack of confidence. however, with certain things I am extremely confident within myself. As a person I probably just seem a bit ‘weird’, but if you were to see my artwork (or hear me talk to myself while painting!) it would probably seem very apsie. I’ve always been very particular about anything I have interest in, and my interests almost become like unhealthy obsessions. I always concentrate on the smallest details with my art, and if I can’t get it right i get really angry and feel like quitting. Or if I can’t paint when i want to I also feel like quitting.

    I really think I need to see a specialist as it would really help me to find some closure as to why I am how I am. When I was in my late teens/early 20’s I’d often cry myself to sleep wondering why I am like I am (and still do occassionally, at 32). I think if it turns out I am an apsie it would help me understand and feel more comfortable being me, and I’d stop worrying about being accepted/sociable. I don’t know if I just think too much about others perceptions of me, or if I am ‘normal’

    Sorry for rambling on!

    I hope some people that read this feel the same and gain a bit of comfort knowing there’s another weirdo just like you in the world 🙂

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Steve 😀

      Thank you too for sharing about your life and experiences. Others surely can read your comments and know that they are not alone!
      For me, knowing that I am not alone with some of the things that I struggle with truly does help!

      I agree that it is probably a good time to seek out a specialist. You can begin with your family doctor and if they are not family with Autism spectrum disorders then ask for a referral to someone who is specialized in this area.

      Let us know how you get on!

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  175. Alexander

    Hello

    I took this test and scored 45. I have had adjustment problems all my life. I feel I am an alien living in the planet of the ape’s. I dont understand jestures like hand waving and other jestures. I have a very strong intrest in quatum physics and other related issues. I would like to know if this feeling I have and my views on human detachments like i have are normal for aspergers?

    Thank you

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Alexander 🙂

      Thanks for sharing your score with us and a little about your struggles.

      You certainly are not alone in those feelings! I know that feeling out of place and like an ‘alien’ can be very difficult. There is no easy or quick solution (that I know of at least 🙂 ). But knowing that others also struggle with similar problems has been helpful to me. I hope it helps you too.

      Let us know if you seek a professional for a diagnosis and how you get on.
      Feel free to come back and leave future comments on any page on this website.

      God bless you!
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  176. Kandy

    I am going to be 26 in December, I just found out that my 6 year old son has Asperger’s and I read that it could be genetic, I did research and found symptoms of Asperger’s his father’s side of the family shows no symptoms so I figured I’d look closer at my family. I know boys are more likely to develop it but my mother and I both show some symptoms. So today I have taken several online “tests” and This one gave me a 51, others have said 36-40. I do believe I have it.
    I speak faster than most people, I have made up “lies” thinking they were real. I show a lot of signs. I guess its time to get to a doctor.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Kandy 😀
      Thanks for sharing a little of your situation with us.

      I agree with you that it is wise to seek out your family doctor and ask them for a diagnosis. If your doctor is not familiar with aspergers then you can ask to be referred to another doctor that is more familiar with ASD.

      Feel free to come back and let us know how you get on after your diagnosis.

      Take care,
      Justine

      Reply
  177. Scott

    Scored 41 I think on this test, found while looking up info for my 02 gsxr, got it yesterday, anxiety keeping me up, found the test by accident, took a few tests 1gave me a 76% chance of being an aspie. Another said very likely an aspie. Not surprised.
    I’ve always been different or eccentric, was put in spec ed. First grade 1979. For vision problems, although i think it was corrected within a year, never got out of spec ed. The main teacher was horrible, didn’t learn as much as we should have, my closest friend at the time is autistic, last saw him over 20 years ago. Not diagnosed dyslexic but often transpose letters or reverse, possibly due to thinking faster then I can write, use either hand to write, was forced to be right handed as a kid.
    Collect many things, records, tv’s, radios, phonographs, wire recorders, cars, fans, cameras, and many more items, OCD is obvious to others. Straying, was told had a high iq when tested as a kid, never fully understood why put is spec ed. Graduated high school with 10 th grade math level, went to college, I think I was in top 10 in math class, rarely used calculator. College seemed easier then high school at times, general communications, was forced to go to college, got my degree, became an electrician, college set me back a few years for that but it gives me an alternative if needed.
    My house is cluttered and appears disorganized, but if nothing is moved by others I usually know where things are, I usually remember in images, but often in black and white, colors are difficult, and sometimes things are mirrored, faces are very difficult.
    I always had trouble listening, accused of daydreaming, not paying attention, went for hearing test a few years ago, as usual was told hearing is good, spoke with the doctor, he said something like it was an inability to concentrate on speech. telephone, noisy areas, tv, music, radio,ham radio and cb are all problems, I use closed captioning, and partial lip reading allows me to fill in the gaps, can’t lip read without sound.
    People in the recent past have said or asked if I had aspergers, I need symmetry, when I masked the stripes on my mustang and camaro they had to be measured, the c stripe on the mustang was traced reversed and copied for the other side, it could have been done by eye, no one would have noticed, but I would have known.
    Often things are done in pairs, eating candy, snacks, knocking,
    Peripheral motion is highly aggravating, and can lead to me having anxiety, or putting me in a bad mood, or me rocking to steady it in my vision.
    I am not one for appearances, luckily my job doesn’t require me to shave, and an added benefit is company uniform.
    Can be clumsy but am good at trap shooting, and accurate with black smithing.
    Radio static can be pleasant,
    Usually eat pizza or hamburgers, most things I like are plain, friends laugh about the jello powder, it’s like pixie sticks but better for you and cheaper, and seems to help with joint pain, possibly due to being born with femeral antiversion, my right foot faced out with my knee in, was always accused of imitating Charlie chaplain, by the time I entered high school my parents realized I had a physical problem, dec 1990 had my leg straightened, bone cut above ankle below knee and below hip with a temporary rod by the hip, that was removed in 1992. Didn’t need much pain meds, no pump, no pain killer needed after rod removal, 10 inch long cut to the bone. I am touch sensitive but its not painful, extreme problem for relationships. Along with not being able to relate well to emotions,
    Hard to express or describe feelings. Don’t understand love,
    Am often referred to as a big kid, can relate well with kids, am often told I would be a great father.
    Sometimes compared with Spock.
    I’ve lost track of what I was orignnally intending, the aspie test gives me an understanding, the more I read about aspergers the more things make sense, at my age 40 tomorrow, there isn’t any point to be officially diagnosed that I can think of, i have done better then many so called normal people. Have to work harder at some things. May by why I am good at saving, do what I want, don’t care much what others think, often not interested In What they have or do,
    Was told I would never make it through college, I got my degree, learning a language was extremely difficult. Barely passed it. My hearing and the teacher having a major speech impediment from a stroke caused me to repeat 1 class, and pneumonia / asthma / allergic reaction to an antibiotic led to repeating the last class.
    Passed my motorcycle knowledge test with only 1 question wrong, and that was from rushing.
    Need to stop writing now

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Scott 🙂
      Thank you for sharing about your life with us.
      Sure sounds like you have had your fair share of challenges!

      Glad that you are keeping a positive attitude and still moving forward in overcoming the anxiety and other challenges.

      I wish you all the very best for the future!

      Justine 😀

      Reply
  178. daniel bacon

    HI i am 14 and my girl friend has aspergers and she thinks i have it i took the test and got 36 and when i was young my mum was told i had it but my mum does not think i have it can you please explain this if you can i am not good at spelling and i like to mess about i am in bottom sets at school apart form it i am in top and history i am in set 3.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Daniel
      Thanks for your comment.
      Probably best for you to get a professional diagnosis from a doctor who is experienced with autism spectrum disorders.

      All the best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
      • Serenity

        How do I get a professional diagnosis?
        I’ve taken 3 test and all say I have supreme Asperger tendencies.
        All my teachers have accused me of having a neurotic disorder or being a sociopath.
        I just want to know how to make things easy and how to get along with others.
        Even my family members think that I have mental issues or am violent and dangerous.
        I just really want help.

        Reply
        • Justine

          Hi Serenity
          Thank you for leaving your questions and comments.

          The best way for you to proceed is to begin by going to your family doctor. Ask them to either test you for Aspergers or to refer you to a professional in your area that is familiar with autism spectrum disorders.

          Let us know how you get on once you follow up with a doctor.

          I wish you all the very best.
          Justine

          Reply
  179. Cassie

    I tested a 43. I’ve taken numerous aspergers tests and all of them say I have it. I believe I have it

    Reply
  180. D. Thomas

    After doing a study on him, my son’s school study team acknowledged that he is on the autism spectrum, – they don’t diagnose asperger’s. But the social workers pointed us, as did a child psychologist along this line. He’s reading and doing mat 4-5 grade levels above his own, but socially… awkward doesn’t begin to decribe it – for he is not even aware of his own awkwardness…

    So researching it, I found much that I resonate too – especially looking back a too my own awkwardness. Interesting that my vocation is that of ministry – I am a pastor – and regularly train pastors and deacons in pastoral care and worship.

    Wondering – since I have “somewhat” adapted… where it is worth going after an “official” diagnoses in your opinion…

    Reply
    • Justine

      Thank you for leaving your comments about your son and your own situation.

      In answer to your question regarding what to do after an ‘official’ diagnosis, I would say that it depends on the age of the person that is receiving the diagnosis.

      If it is a child or teen then it is especially important to ensure that the child receives as much support as possible in order to prepare them for life. This could include consulting a doctor or professional that is very familiar with autism spectrum disorders and asperger’s syndrome. Such a person would be able to create and tailor a plan that would teach the child skills to cope better in varying situations, to focus on his/her strengths and to work on his/her weak areas.

      For a child or teenager this may also include added support and assistance in school to give the child the best opportunity to grow, learn, develop and even to ‘fit in’.

      If it is an adult receiving the diagnosis then as you said they have probably ‘adapted’ in many areas of their life already to try to ‘fit in’ and be like other people. So finding a support group of other people with an ASD (autism spectrum disorder) would be a great place to start as this shows that the person is not alone and it gives them a place where they can receive support and encouragement for any struggles they are going thru.

      I do wish your son and family all the very best and would love to hear back from you.

      God’s Richest Blessings!

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  181. Michelle

    I am a 45 year old female and my AQ was 47. I am not surprised by this as I have taken other tests and have long known I am on the spectrum although my only official diagnosis to date has been “social anxiety disorder”. Wutrevah. I just wanted to say for those who may wonder if it is worthwhile knowing if you are an Aspie or on the Autism spectrum, in my experience it is. I have been much more at ease with myself and others and even relieved to know that many of my most difficult childhood and early adult memories now have a better explanation. Just understanding myself better has been like a tremendous weight has been lifted from my soul. I don’t feel “wrong” or “bad” about it. I just feel like I better know who I am and use that in my daily life and relationships.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Michelle

      Thank you for what you shared! 🙂

      I agree that having a diagnosis, even as a middle-aged adult, can remove the feeling of something being wrong with me and instead it can bring an understanding that I am just different from others.

      I am truly glad to hear that a weight has been lifted from you! That is awesome and an important part of your journey.

      Take care and keep in touch.

      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  182. Girl

    Hello! I am 24 but I took the test as the 11-12-year-old me and I scored 27. Up until today I had never heard of that disorder and never even considered the possibility that I might be autistic but so many of the symptoms sounded like me it was scary!
    I hope I will not bore you with all the details I’m going to share. I have never preferred to be on my own. I have always, always craved communication. I think I had some friends in primary school but I don’t remember the details. Anyway, in middle school I had no friends. I was alone all the time and it was painful. Not only this, I was bullied at school and then taken advantage of by fake friends. I was actually the highest achiever academically even though I didn’t really study. I was called nerd and humiliated for this. I was also very clumsy at basketball (although I’m a fast runner) and my bullies never missed the opportunity to remind me of that. Life was hell for me, also my parents fighting at home so I had no place I felt good. The only outlet was writing letters to my older cousin, she was my only friend but I needed to be accepted among my peers. I tried desperately to make friends, sometimes with temporary success but some of the friendships left me devastated and others just went nowhere. In summer I made many friends but they were all younger – when you are 12, it’s not exactly normal that your friends are 7-8-9 years old. I wasn’t bullied in high school but still had difficult relationships. I just wanted a friend but I couldn’t seem to make them. I heard things about me being selfish, weird, strange that deeply hurt me. I had a friend who ended up with an eating disorder and I was the only one who stayed by her side even when I’d rather do something else. I just didn’t want her to feel as lonely as I used to feel. Anyway, she accused me of not doing enough and being a bad friend. This broke my heart and I gave up. Finally, in the last year of high school I became friends with a girl who I still call my best friend. She was the other high academic achiever in my class. Then, I started developing more friendships and now I have a lot of friends and a lot of close friends. I discovered it’s easier for me to make new friends now. I like reading (as a child I used to read so much), I like libraries but I love parties. I always wanted to be a part of them before and when I found the right people to party with, they could see I’m actually the soul of the party (I’m especially fond of dancing). But I can’t party with anyone. I also enjoy meeting new people and finally it works.
    However, people still misinterpret me. I’m extremely sensitive and fragile, plus I can’t hide my emotions, yet, I still hear about me that I am cold and the dreaded weird. People think I’m rude when I’m so nervous and trying to leave good impression (that was the case with one phone call to my ex boyfriend’s parents – I was crushed to find out they thought I was rude and bad mannered). I engage in conflicts and I have no idea why. Even some of my closest friends were surprised when I told them I feel really bad rejecting people – it looks like I don’t care? I’m extremely empathetic, to the point of hurting really bad when I see other people hurt (sometimes can’t get it out of my mind), also after being bullied I desperately try to help anyone who looks like a victim. I hate people seeing me crying but I often cry alone. Somehow people are unaware of the fact I want to help others. I have also heard I nitpick too much. I always notice errors (please forgive me, English is not my mother tongue), no matter how small but I am very disorganised. My handwriting is appalling and some people have said it looks childish. I have many ticks, I fidget a lot, I’m kind of often nervous (I look more nervous than I am or maybe I’m more nervous than I realise), I’ve always had trouble falling asleep. I also have a tendency to focus on lot on a particular interest and dig all the information I can discover. I really enjoyed reading even as a child (and was ashamed of it), when I like a book I can’t stop reading it (even if it’s about grammar for instance which doesn’t really interest most children). I wonder, do I have this disorder but have worked on it (a lot of work left) or I’m just a normal person with issues?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Precious Friend 🙂

      Thank you for sharing this huge section of your life with us! That is a big step and I greatly appreciate it!

      Beside the dancing part of what you shared, I can relate so well to what you shared. (I am shy and not confident at dancing – Two left feet! 🙂 )
      I truly feel for you and the experiences that you have had.

      My advice for you at this point in time is to do the following:

      1. Look for a doctor who understands about Autism Spectrum Disorders and Asperger’s Syndrome and go and talk to them. Ask the doctor for a test and tell them you want a diagnosis to know if you do have an ASD.

      2. Find a Asperger’s or ASD support group around your local area. In such a group you will find others who have had (and are having) similar struggles and experiences to you. This will not only support and encourage you, but it will also show you that you are NOT alone! 🙂

      Please write back and let me know how you get on.

      I truly wish you all the very best.

      Blessings and Prayers,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
      • Girl

        Thank you so much!
        After more research I now know for sure I have Asperger’s. This just explains my life. But I’m not going to look for a doctor because I’m sure I know more about Asperger’s than most doctors in my country and I don’t want the stigma of an official diagnose (in my country most probably it will be a problem sooner or later).
        About dancing – I have always had problems learning steps and following other people. I have always been very clumsy. I cried a lot when I couldn’t do a group dance for a school performance (I finally did it after a lot of work). I studied ballroom dancing and I loved it but it was so difficult to learn to follow the lead, not to step on his feet and spinning was a nightmare (again, a lot of practice).
        However, when I improvise and I don’t follow any instructions, and when I really enjoy the music (like in a night club), I dance in a unique way. I dance with real passion and enthusiasm, I get lost in the music and my body becomes one with it. Many people have told me my eyes are full of life when dancing and some of my ex boyfriends have said they are very seductive and attractive (well, I have had some accidents with falling but mostly after alcohol consumption and they were more funny than embarrassing). After reading Eckhart Tolle’s books I know why – to be doing something great you need enthusiasm, you need to go above thinking. When I think about the steps and worry what to do, I just block my natural joy and I perform badly. Also, being an Aspie, following the others and doing the same thing as they do is a lot more difficult than doing it my own way.
        I hope this brings more optimism. All of you with Asperger’s syndrome – find your passion and don’t be afraid to do things differently. If you own it, people will be in awe. And it can be something you have failed in the past.

        Reply
        • Justine

          Hi 🙂

          Thank you so very much for opening up and bearing your soul to us!

          I am glad to hear that you have found your passion and are enjoying dance now, without the rigid rules that made you feel clumsy.

          All the very best for your future and thank you again for your encouragement to others!

          Justine 🙂

          Reply
  183. Lain

    hi my name is Lain. I was diagnosed with manic depression 10yrs ago I m 46 now and I scored 35. my daughter suspected I had adhd or autism but it seems I have all 3 is this possible? mental health team said I had a personality disorder. I ve had anorexia and suffer with ocds. I just need to know how to explain all this to a doctor I get bouts of extreme anger and lashing out at those I love but am scared. please help

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Lain

      Thank you for sharing some of your struggles with us.

      The most important thing that I can say is for you to go and talk to a doctor. Find a doctor in your area who is familiar with Aspergers and Autism Spectrum Disorders. Such a doctor will understand the symptoms of ASD and should be able to test you and give a diagnoses.

      In regards as to what to say to the doctor, just find one who knows about Autism and explain your symptoms and experiences. Ask for a diagnosis.

      I truly wish you all the very best and hope to hear back from you as to how you get on.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  184. Vedran

    Hi,i got 40 her and on other 172/200.i also suffer from social phobia and using medication.
    To ne honest, i would change all of this for simpler life but i cant..today, social interaction is the most important part of human life and we simply cant survive without contact. I think this can be controled, just consider it as a gift to see the world in different colors and use some kind of therapy for social problems 😉

    regards from croatia

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Vedran

      I like your positive attitude of looking at the world with different colors! Having a good positive attitude is a great start to overcoming challenges that you may face.

      I look forward to hearing from you again.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  185. Cara

    I have had a 2 year relationship with a sweet man who possesses a solid character but that has a tremendously difficult time communicating, expressing emotion and responding to the emotions of others. It has been up and down, frequently down. After describing our interactions to a couple of close friends, both independently suggested that my boyfriend may have Asberger’s. Not knowing really what this was, I did some reading and took your test, to the best of my ability, from his perspective. “He” scored a 37. We broke up a few days ago due to our mutual frustration. I felt my needs were perpetually unmet, he felt overwhelmed by the demands of girlfriend as well as business and troubled teen. Girlfriend was the easiest to let go.

    Next steps???
    a) Nothing. It will likely never work.
    b) Approach him with what I have learned in the hope that he will be interested in self discovery and help with social skills to mend at least two strained relationships.
    c) _____________

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Cara,

      Thank you for opening up about your relationship and all.

      You ask your next steps…

      If you are still in touch with your boyfriend then by all means share with him what you have learned and see if he will be happy to take the Quiz on this website. He may like to learn more about himself.

      You never know if you do not ask. So by all means talk to him about this AQ test.

      I look forward to hearing back from you soon. Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  186. Cyber

    I was diagnosed with the AS as a child and i only scored like 10.

    If i could describe myself with one word, that word would be – chaos. I don’t plan my day. I often improvise on the run. Everything i do is random and unorganized. I do things differently every time. I don’t get stuck into certain routines easily. And i don’t like to talk about just one certain topic on and on. And i rarely talk to others about my hobbies at all. And i noticed that sarcasm and metaphors are a mayor part of my language 😛

    Anyway, i wanted to know this. Lets say i go to doctor and they find out i no longer match the criteria of being autistic, what happens then? I’m gonna end up in Guantanamo Bay, lol. Nah, just kidding. But seriously, what happens then? Anyway, good luck and good day 😀

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Cyber

      Thanks for sharing about yourself! 🙂

      I am not sure exactly what to say. If you were diagnosed with AS as a child and only scored a 10 then perhaps you have learned coping mechanisms that have allowed you to relate to those around you. This may have changed the way you see things and interact with others.

      If it is still bothering you then perhaps you could go back to your doctor (or one who is familiar with ASDs) and ask to be retested.

      Let me know how you get on. Take care,
      Justine

      Reply
  187. Howie Hayward

    Hello , i took the test & got a 25 , I’m 47 & am trying to improve my life , but i find it difficult , to find direction almost to the point of anxiety & definitely to depresion ve always been a person who seems organized but is definately disorganized , typical thin gs that i constantly do is think i know where something is , or i “just saw it and can never find it , when i was young i used to pester my parents who thought perhaps i didn’t look or was being lazy but i look to a point where i almost get fixated , often upset , or my mind just gets i call racey or so wound up its blank . Thats just one exaple & i dont even know if its a good one , but i really need to find guidance or solution so i can move ahead and improve my life . Thank you

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Howie

      Thanks for sharing about yourself with us. 🙂

      Two things you can do.

      1. Find a doctor who knows about Autism spectrum disorders and Asperger’s Syndrome and as to be tested. This may be a good first step for you.

      2. Look for a local support group near your home for those with ASD or those with loved ones with it. A support group is often helpful as it puts you in touch with others in a similar situation.
      You then see that you are not alone! 🙂

      I look forward to hearing how you get on.

      All the very best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  188. Art

    Okay, So i scored a 41 on this test. I do have questions, because i have always had trouble intergating in social settings. I’m very easily flustered if my wife or kids interrupt my reading, model building, cleaning. I can relax when i go out unless everything at home is buttoned down. With work i seem to do very well with the monotonous or organizational parts and poorly with interpersonal relations…. So help me with the next step please.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Art

      Thanks for leaving your comment and sharing your score. 🙂

      The best thing that I can say is that you have 2 options and probably should look at doing both.

      You can seek out a professional doctor in your area who is familiar with Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and can do a test in order to give you a diagnosis.

      The second thing I would say is to search for an ASD support group in your local area. Here you will be able to relate to others who are having similar struggles to your own. This can be very helpful!

      Let me know how you get on.
      Take care,
      Justine

      Reply
    • Kurt Spindler

      I scored a 36 on the test. Though I have seen some people with Aspbergers are married or have had intimate relationships, I don’t understand it. My social skills are so impaired that I have never been able to establish an intimate relationship with anyone of the opposite sex at all. To me, it is a big success if I am able to carry on a pretty normal conversation with someone about a topic.

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hey Kurt 🙂
        I hear what you are saying. Establishing intimate relationships is hard at the best of times, but definitely can be much more challenging when Aspergers syndrome comes into the equation.

        Could you possibly join a local support group for Aspies? If so then perhaps you could build some friendships through the group. You never know, but this could lead to some more intimate relationships.

        I wish you all the best.
        Justine

        Reply
  189. Rory

    Hello, I am a student who is studying on therapy for autistic children. I wonder that you have a reference (e.g. journal article) about the criteria:

    0-11 low result – indicating no tendency at all towards autistic traits.
    11-21 is the average result that people get (many women average around 15 and men around 17)
    22-25 shows autistic tendencies slightly above the population average
    26-31 gives a borderline indication of an autism spectrum disorder. It is also possible to have aspergers or mild autism within this range.
    32-50 indicates a strong likelihood of Asperger syndrome or autism.

    Thank you in advance.

    Reply
  190. Tim

    I am a 49-year-old male. I have never felt comfortable in private conversations with others, find it difficult to make close friends and tend to enjoy being alone more than being with others. And yet at times I crave for close, personal friendship and intimacy but when the opportunity comes, I close up and feel very, very uncomfortable. I actually do better in a public setting, since I am a high school teacher and active in the local church. Publicly I’m good but privately I’m very uncomfortable when someone gets too close. This led me to your test and I scored a 37. I’m a bit surprised and wondering where I should go from here.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Tim

      I appreciate you opening up and sharing. I can relate to your struggles in relating to others.

      I would say that the best thing to do at this stage would probably be to find a support group in your local area and join with others who are having similar struggles to you. This is often very helpful and will let you know that you are not alone!

      Let me know how you get on.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  191. Izzy

    Hi,

    I am 15 years old, and I scored a 40 on this test. When I was younger, I was diagnosed with ADHD, anxiety, and a slow processing speed. I talked to my mom about how I believe I have Asperger’s Syndrome as well, because I am ultimately non-functioning in the majority of social situations, and she told me that even though I’m awkward, I act too “nice” to have Asperger’s. But the thing is, I answered these questions truthfully and I want to get a confirmed diagnosis. Basically I am wondering, based on my results, is it worth going to the doctor to get a confirmed diagnosis?

    Thanks,
    Izzy

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Izzy
      Thanks for your comments. 🙂

      Yes. I would say it is definitely the best plan to go and see a doctor. Look for a doctor that is familiar with Autism Spectrum Disorders as they will be able to help you much more than a general doctor who does not really know about Aspergers and ASDs.

      I wish you all the best and hope you come back and let us know how to got on.

      Take care,
      Justine

      Reply
  192. Nina

    I’m 22 years old and it just dawned on me not long ago that I might have asperger syndrome. I scored 34 and pretty sure I got it since it explains so much all my hardships I have been through with regard to social relationship. I can never work out how to behave with propriety, tend to speak whatever I have in my mind without an attempt to restrain, which offend peoples and so much more struggle. Now knowing I have asperger makes me wonder if it can bring any positive light to my life, since I want to work in the literature/psychology/philosophy field, but people who work there all have high intelligence, while I have difficulty working out abstract things like intentions. Can anyone give me some advice?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Nina 🙂

      Thanks for commenting and sharing about yourself.

      It is always best to seek out a professional doctor who is familiar with autism spectrum disorders. Find someone in your local area who can help you and direct you towards a local support group.

      It certainly helps having others in a similar situation to talk to with.

      I look forward to hearing how you get on.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  193. Kathy

    I just took the test for my 10 year old son. We first noticed it when he started school. They had an IEP done and found that he needed academic help. He tested at 3rd grade level while he’s in 5th grade. I’ve been concerned that he showed AS but most of his symptoms lean towards ADHD. He was just tested by an Autism specialist and Autism was ruled out. After months of research and several tests online, it shows he’s right on the cusp of AS. Is it possible they ruled out AS because he was off by 3-4 numbers on the scale? He exhibits mild signs along with strong signs of ADHD. I’m still concerned that he does have mild signs of AS mixed with very high signs of ADHD. He’s being tested this week for ADHD. My concern is are they ruling out AS because of the ADHD symptoms which run very close to AS. Should I get a second opinion? All tests and signs lead to ‘mild asberger’ combined with similar ADHD symptoms.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Kathy

      Thanks for sharing about your son.

      It would be best if you can seek out a professional who is familiar with asperger’s syndrome and Autism spectrum disorders. Then your son will be able to get assistance and treatment. It is much better to begin at an early age (such as he is now 🙂 ) so that he learns skills etc that will help him as he grows up.

      Let us know how you get on.

      All the very best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  194. C

    I scored pretty high…like 45. I am 27 and don’t have insurance but I doubt I could even bring up this test with a doctor if I tried. I know ‘something’ is wrong because I can’t even explain to DSHS why I can’t work (I have, just never held a job fir more than 4 months) so I live with my boyfriend otherwise I would be homeless. I am totally isolated except for my boyfriend (who i am not happy with). What do I do if I can’t advocate fir myself? It’s hard to get help I kniw because no one ever listens to me.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi ‘C’

      Thanks for sharing about yourself.

      I feel for you and can relate. It is not always easy struggling to relate to others.

      Probably a good idea would be to search in your local area for a support group for people effected with Aspergers or an Autism Spectrum Disorder. A group like this would allow you to feel safe and at home and would also give you contacts that could help you in your situation.

      Let us know how you get on.

      All the Best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Cass

      Thanks for sharing your score. 🙂

      It may be difficult to tell your parents, but it would be good if you can talk to them or another trusted friend or family member.
      Let them know what you are feeling and thinking and about your concerns with it all.

      It is not easy, but is an important step to take.

      Let me know how you get on.
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  195. Evi

    The test I took was not actually me. I was testing my ex boyfriend and answering as him. He scored very high into the Aspie range. I did test myself on another site. I definitely don’t have it. That’s probably why were attracted. I liked the fact he saw the world differently from how I do. I should have known something was up when I suggested he journal his unique thoughts. His reply was “what if someone steals it and reads it?” The very things that made us gravitate to each other broke us apart. We haven’t spoken in months. I hope he’s ok.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Thanks Evi for commenting 🙂

      If you do speak to your boy friend again let him know about this test and he can do it for himself.
      It would be interesting to see the results he gets.

      Take care,
      Justine

      Reply
  196. meg

    Well, to start with-sorry for my bad English I’m Cro,I was diagnosed with OCD-NOS, selective mutism, anxiety disorder, BPD,ADD, tics (not Tourette type) and disorder of social development in childhood when I was 8… didnt have friend till college, still having hard time managing friendship (they say I’m rude but I’m just being honest)…I get upset even when small changes of daily routine occur cuz for me it is the end of the world…all of mine diagnoses were ‘turned’ into Aspergers sy. last year, since I’m studying speech language pathology and I have had some issues there, they got me checked out there and decided it wasnt al these F. but AS…. nothing actually changed since then, cuz I believe that people with ASD and ‘OCD-NOS,ADD,BPD,selective mutism and disorder of social development’ are actually suffering the same, the only thing that changed is that my colleagues dont call me ‘the weird kid’ that paces down the hall all day, they dont talk shit about me anymore, I’m good with small kids and grown ups but except my only friend never managed to interact with peers, and Im a girl, although I occasionally visit punk concerts (no one looks at u as if u re weird there)….I have photographic memory, obssesion (or special interest as u like it) in numbers, plains, physics, neuroscience etc…I like sports but never played because of lack of social skills (I ran away from soccer team)…it can be hard…especially when Im hyperactive and cant gather my thoughts… I have trouble with oral exams in college (not that I lack knowledge or verbal expression, it is their type of questions that confuse me, for instance: when do secondary brain injuries occur- logically after primary injury to the brain)-well, tough luck that was not what professor ment…and stuff like that…I can be very sarcastic to others, but can’t tell what their intentions are, I got weird sense of humor according to them…I scored here 41 (I reckon it is high score for me lol)…and I hate when stereotipies (or compulsatory behaviour as they called it) kicks in public and I get stressed up as twice trying not to act on them, and is really hard to find someone to talk about topics of my interest since I’m studying SLP :/ , well at least I’m awesome in diagnostics 😀 and obssesion about number 9…oh lord, it started when I was 4 yo (could count before talk lol)…and I’m top student but missing a lot of stuff since Im just too paranoid to set off in another country for student exchange,well it seems they’re stuck with me here 😀 jep, it’s hard to get the point of my comment, I know, but I just dont care… I enjoy helping people, but sometimes (ok all the times) I m too direct in communication, but, need no changes if u ask me…but I hate people getting AS diagnosis as grown ups than flaunting about it on FB, really, whats the point -.- (is this the right emoticon?) cheers with beers 😀

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Meg

      Thanks for sharing with us. 🙂
      You did very well with your English by the way!

      It sounds like you have a pretty good grasp of who you are as a person and your limitations and giftings. Feel free to come back anytime and let us know more of your story.

      Many Blessings,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  197. Tiff

    I got a score of 37 but I’m not dxed as having an ASD. I was given a diagnosis of nonverbal learning disability instead of Aspergers by a clinical psychologist about three years ago although I suspect I’m at least on the spectrum because I wring my hands, twiddle my fingers, and talk to myself all the time. I also used to “talk” to my hands when I was little and flap my hands as well while just walking around or running back and forth.

    I’m considering getting a second opinion on the NLD by a different psychologist as soon as I can.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Tiff
      Thanks for commenting. 🙂

      It is probably a good idea to get a second opinion. Seek out a professional who is familiar with ASDs as they will be able to assist you more than a general doctor or psychologist.

      Let us know how you get on.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  198. Ashly

    I’m 16, and I have a lot of social issues that are further complicated by high school being a horrible place. I’ve never related well to other people my age, and I have a tendency to talk to adults more often than my fellow classmates. My parents always thought I was just mature for my age and “gifted” (I’ve been at the top of my class since grade school.), but I always felt out of place. After a series of mental breakdowns, I found out about ASD and decided to take this test. I got a score of 46. What should I do now?

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Ashly
      Thanks for taking the aspergers quiz and for leaving a comment. 🙂

      The next step should be to seek a professional diagnosis. You can begin by going to your family doctor and talking to him or her. Tell them about the asperger’s test that you did online and your concerns with not relating well to others and feeling ‘out of place’.

      Your doctor should be able to either take you through some further tests, if they are familiar with autism spectrum disorders. Otherwise they will be able to refer you to someone who specialises in ASD and the diagnosis of aspergers syndrome.

      I wish you all the very best and would love to hear back from you once you have followed up with your family GP.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  199. alice

    I got diagnosed with ASD about a month ago. I felt pretty bad about it but did some research and its not that bad. I scored 43 in the test. I didn’t get a diagnosis for 15 years of my life though which is a good thing? I just feel so confused about everything and everyones been really secretive with me.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hey Alice,
      It is very true that the time of diagnosis can be difficult and come as a shock. I found though that once the shock and confusion wear off it helped explain some things that had not previously made sense in my life.

      I really wish you all the best and hope you can find others that you can open up to and share what you are feeling.

      Take care,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
  200. James P.

    I am 32, my twin brother and I are very similar in that we have mostly a strong interest in music and nothing else, we find certain changes of chords funny or amusing… anyway. most of my life people have said i am rude, or being a jackass, when I’m just saying whats on my mind. I try to be ‘social’ and do well with the few ‘friends’ i have, but large groups and so-called chit-chat doesn’t really make sense, in that i see it as completely banal and useless, so why do it, right? I like being right, cause, in hindsight i have found myself to be correct on many occasions. I ramble a lot about stupid stuff that I guess nobody cares about. On occasions my wife gets fed up with my personality and says i should change, i try to for about a week, then i’m back to my normal, whatever that is. I feel like i don’t really have control over myself, that i just do stuff. I’ve considered seeing someone about possibly having ASD, but i feel like a hypochondriac and i don’t like doctors much cause, again, i have been right when they haven’t. I feel like i can “function” in society to a point, but it’s tiring psychologically, and i just want to stay inside on the computer, internet, write music, or something… It seems that some of my social skills have been learned through force, and while i now feel genuine when greeting someone, it always feels stupid and weird. My brain sometimes goes through this process where I must consciously say to myself “what is the right thing to say? Oh, crap, what do I say now?”
    I could go on…. Maybe someone can relate to this???

    Reply
    • James P.

      Some of those questions I honestly wished there was an option for I DON’T KNOW, like, the four options listed weren’t satisfactory for how my mental processes function.

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hey James,
        I hear what you are saying. It is not always easy to select one of the provided answers. I also wish there was another option as you suggested, but unfortunately the quiz is set up as it has been created by the professionals and can’t easily be altered.

        Take Care,
        Justine

        Reply
    • Justine

      Hey James 🙂

      Thank you so much for opening up and sharing all that you did! I can say that you are NOT alone!

      I know that having to force yourself to behave in ways that those around you expect can be extremely tiring and wearing. It can also be frustrating seeing others talk and relate with no effort (at least that is how it seems), when you need to concentrate on every word trying to say the ‘right’ thing. 🙂

      Perhaps you could find a support group for aspergers where you could go along and chat with others that are experiencing similar things to you. Just an idea, but it may help to talk with people who can relate and understand where you are coming from.

      Then when you go back home or to work etc you can feel more relaxed as that built up frustration and stress has lessened.

      Please, James, feel free to let us know how you go and if you do decide to find a group of ‘like-minded’ individuals.

      All the very best,
      Justine

      Reply
    • Enigma

      yeah… know the feeling… i scored a 42 i the test and was diagnosed as an aspie at the age of 25… and what you have wrtitten, i can completely relate to… my life in a nut sheel…

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hi Enigma

        Thanks for sharing your score. It is true that ASD can certainly make life more challenging.
        Perhaps you would benefit from finding an ASD support group near where you live.

        Let me know how you get on.
        Justine 🙂

        Reply
  201. Jasmine

    Well, I scored a 40. I’ve also emailed my neurologist neurologist with some concerns that were not related to my Tourette Syndrome. I suppose we’re going to look into OCD and ASDs now.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Jasmine, thanks for your comment. Hope all goes well with your doctor’s reply.
      Take care.
      Justine

      Reply
  202. Giles

    I find it mildly amusing that everywhere it states something along the lines of “If your resulting AQ score was above 31 then you may want to follow up with a medical practitioner to do further tests in order to determine 100% if you do have an ASD or aspergers.”

    Yes, I’m taking a test which denotes my dislike of social situations but I’m supposed to go to a doctor. generating such a situation.

    That’s beside the fact that all of the many doctors I’ve ever met are also incompetent to boot (several of those incompetent imbeciles being the reasons my mother – 2012 – and grandmother – in 1986 – died and I almost did about 16 years ago) but hey.

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Giles
      Thanks for sharing with us.

      Sorry to hear that you have not had great experiences with doctors in the past. I hope that the future will be better for you and that if you want to get a professional diagnosis that you will be able to find a doctor that you can relate to and feel comfortable with!

      All the best and feel free to let us know how you get on. 🙂

      Justine

      Reply
  203. katerina

    hello i am probably an aspie (33 score or 138/200), i am 33 yerss old i have always compared my self with others and thought my intentions were very different than other peoples. i am a beautiful woman as men say but i understand that if they know me better thay dont know how to come close to me and sometimes they just stay around trying to find out how to approach me.i have read a lot in my life so as to self improve -like having eye contact-i used to be afraid to look in the eyes , now i actually look someone straight but…i dont know when i should stop looking etc- thanks to my nice overall appearance people think it sweet but i can tell a questionmark in their eyes. i have my own job because i cant coopetate well but i do well when i lead. my problem now is that since a friend told me about me having asperger my life changed and i am very relieved about it but i live in a country that any kind of difference is not easily wrlcome and mental doctors who might give guidelines are too expencive. i would like you please to tell me if there is an online guide for aspies but not for severe cases just the mild ones i guess. people are very attracted to me and some good people stay around me because my intentions even to handsome men are innocent. i have a normal sex life when in love with someone but cant think one night stand.all men that felt in love with me wanted to marry me but i stepped back. also i have the problem that i really like someone this period and he likes me back but when we meet i understand that i overmake moves and i see a questionmark in his eyes sometimes.what to do? how to stop moving my head when e.g. nodding yes or what etc. family cant help me due to divorce and many duties and luck of time. i now know that i am very close to find out why i am what i am and i really want to work onit to improve. i have some loyal friends but i cant take part to a normal converstation unless i feel very comfortable. then other people sometimes say that i have a superb way to use languange and make to the point litterally but some other times i just dont know what to say in simple questions. i know i got you tired probably but i need some quides to study and follow. i am very energetic and no friends can follow my activeness so i can walk for hours in a fast pace. i used to have boulimia for a dacde but i fought it on my own by studing about it so i know i can do this too. please. thank you so much for your time :* sorry for typing mistakes its from selfphone

    Reply
    • Justine

      Hi Katerina
      Thank you for your comment and for sharing part of your life and experiences with us.

      I wish you all the best,
      Justine 🙂

      Reply
    • Wouter

      Hey Katarina,

      Your story sounds very familiar to me, although I’m a man. My score is 36,I am 36 years old.
      It is wrong to think you can “fight” this. The best thing to do is accept, and go on. I was looking all my life why I am not like everybody else. And I wanted to be; but now I ask myself why? All the social stuff is “beyond us”, because are brain is not wired to understand this. It is wired to be “extremely precise” in “one or several domains”; like music, artists, scientists, you walking for hours… Be proud of that. There’s no way in hell, we got this far (in the world) without aspies…. The greatest minds in history probably were (check it).
      I just think this is necessary in human evolution, do not see it as a “disease” that someone can cure. The best you can do is “adapt” if you want to. I used to “adapt” a lot and do adjust me to the situation. Intelligence is very good for doing that. Though, on the more personal relations side; this tends to be a problem. Overthinking everything puts a stop on the “fluency” of the conversation, the act, or anything else. But I can’t ask myself to stop thinking, I believe neither can you. Even yesterday, I’ve attracted someone, I did not wish to attract, by just not knowing when to stop looking straight at them. It happens all the time. But it’s not very negative to get that kind of attention, I guess. I usually am straightforward and say I have Asperger, some of them back off then 😉 Because they think it’s a disease (ignorance, hihi)… Both the relations I had in the past , went on for 7 years; they cracked both at “intimacy”. Though the last relation gave me a son, almost miraculously, because we only had sex once. Now I’m at a point that I know why I get in these situations, were I fall easely in love with someone, and she with me, but there is no “passion” because she’s only with me, because I’m a good listener, I pay attention to details, also to her, girls love that. And probably got more like “a friend” then the boyfriend. Get that a lot. I more easely make friends with women, then with guys. Also, falling into addictions for us, is very easy, too easy in fact. The brain likes repetition, so you should be aware, that being obese, addicted or depressed is most likely to occur, when you are alone, overthinking your situation.
      I hope you forgive my typing, I’m not a dutch speaking person, so I have to translate verything. Hope it makes sense, and it helps you somewhat.

      Reply
      • Justine

        Hi Wouter

        Thank you for sharing all that about your life. 🙂

        It sounds like you have already given this whole topic a lot of thought and I appreciate you opening up on this website.

        Feel free to come back anytime and share with us again.

        Many Blessings,
        Justine 🙂

        Reply

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